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Sound Effect

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Episodes

Can't Let Go: Sound Effect, Episode 125

11/18/2017
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This week on Sound Effect, our theme is "Can’t Let Go." KNKX newsies Ariel Van Cleave and Ed Ronco reminisce about their obscure instruments. Then we talk to Jillian Venters, who gives advice to people of the gothic subculture , including those who are aging within it. Next, we head to Tacoma where a man is making an effort to celebrate author Frank Herbert. Then we take a ride in one of the oddest vehicles you’ll ever see: a hearse, decked out in pink , and available for parties. We get...

Duration: 00:49:16


The Melody Of These Two Obsure Instruments Lingers On

11/18/2017
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All Things Considered host Ed Ronco and Morning Edition producer Ariel Van Cleave came to learn their respective instruments after things didn't work out with their first choice. Ed started with the trumpet, but the combination of the smaller mouthpiece and a mouth full of braced turned out to be a painful experience. So he moved to the baritone horn, which had a larger mouthpiece, and never looked back. Ariel, on the other hand, just had a distaste for her assigned instrument, the...

Duration: 00:04:47


Aging Gracefully In The Gothic Subculture Armed With Politeness And Manners

11/18/2017
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There are still certain parts of our youth that we identify with and often don’t want to let go of. And the number of subcultures out there that people have come to identify with is expansive. For Jillian Venters, there is little question in her mind as to the subculture she identifies with. “I’m kind of a romantic goth with Victorian goth tinges. I get more Victorian goth as the weather gets cooler. It is really hard to wear velvet frock coats and top hats during high summer.” Jillian has...

Duration: 00:08:51


Meet A Leader Of The Flat Earth Movement

11/18/2017
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When it comes to scientific arguments nowadays, there’s a good chance sooner or later someone will be compared to people who believe the earth is flat. Most would consider that an insult, but not Mark Sargent. The Whidbey Island resident spends much of his time promoting the belief that the earth is not round or spherical but actually, definitely flat. He’s not joking. And he claims that there is plenty of proof out there to prove him right. That is why Sargent created Flat Earth Clues , a...

Duration: 00:09:57


Up In The Air: Sound Effect, Episode 107

11/11/2017
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This show originally aired on May 27, 2017. This week on Sound Effect, our theme is "Up in the Air." We open the show by meeting Space Needle elevator operator B.J. Listman gets to see one of the best views in the world every single day for his job. We then talk to UW Earth and space sciences faculty member Robert Winglee who has designed a drone that can fly at an altitude of about 80,000 feet. Next, a conversation with Jesse Hayes, a Boeing engineer and president of the Red Tailed Hawks...

Duration: 00:47:56


The View From The Top Never Gets Old For This Space Needle Elevator Operator

11/11/2017
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This story originally aired on May 27, 2017. B.J. Listman is one of the elevator operators at the Space Needle. The Space Needle and the Smith Tower, according to B.J, are the only places left in Seattle where there are actually elevator operators. This iconic Seattle landmark has enchanted B.J. since he was a child. “It's kind of funny actually. I have one of those three-foot tall paper Space Needle models, and the model kit had you glued the elevators in place, but I never did because I...

Duration: 00:04:41


Red-Tailed Hawks Flying Club Gets Kids Of Color Interested In Flying

11/11/2017
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This story originally aired on May 27, 2017. Jesse Hayes’ love of flying began as a kid growing up in Texas. His family had a car but they also had an airplane, which Jesse’s father adored. Jesse says that as an African-American family, that meant that they could literally fly over racism when they went on trips to visit family. The airplane made it possible for Jesse’s family to avoid the things that made traveling difficult for so many people of color in the American South at that time —...

Duration: 00:09:00


Researchers Test New Technology That Could Lead To Longer-Lasting Satellites

11/11/2017
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This story originally aired on May 27, 2017. A group of students from the University of Washington is working on a way to create satellites that could stay up indefinitely and fly in a circle over a particular patch of the earth. The results could mean cell phone and internet coverage in disaster areas, along with super-high-resolution images of remote places on the planet. Right now, they’re testing their ideas, which have taken the shape of a 12-pound glider with a 20-foot wingspan...

Duration: 00:08:39


For Refugees In Seattle, Rising Rents Mean The Search For Home Isn’t Over

11/11/2017
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This story originally aired on May 27, 2017. There’s a letter on Yulina Bilombele’s dining room table that she cannot read. “Defendant failed to pay the rent and has further failed to vacate and surrender the premises.” Bilombele is a refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo. She’s 80 years old. She does not speak English. She is too frail to work and she does not have the money to pay rent. So, she turns to the man many Congolese refugees in Seattle call: Floribert Mubalama. “They...

Duration: 00:04:36


Remembering The Golden Age Of Commercial Flight, When Meals Were Cooked From Scratch

11/11/2017
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This story originally aired on May 27, 2017. Traveling on a commercial flight these days can be rough. Perks such as free meals and pillows are long gone. Today, airlines charge for everything from where you sit on the plane to how much legroom you’re allotted. It’s easy to forget there was a time, not too long ago, when passengers dressed up to get on an airplane. 79-year-old Gloria Sferra remembers very well what flying used to be like. She was a stewardess for Pan American Airlines from...

Duration: 00:08:19


Burien Man Turns His Lifelong Passion For Doves Into A Small, Soaring Business

11/11/2017
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This story originally aired on May 27, 2017. Michael McAndrews has had a lifelong love affair with birds. It all started with an article he read as a kid in National Geographic. It profiled homing pigeons used in wartime to communicate messages between troops. Michael was captivated by the story of a bird named Cher Ami that saved almost 200 American soldiers in France during World War I. So he started buying his own birds and training them. In fact, his classmates called him “birdbrain,”...

Duration: 00:10:15


Home From War, Female Veteran Discovers Not All Military Service Is Valued Equally

11/10/2017
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This story originally aired on April 30, 2016. Vanessa Davids did most of her military service “inside the wire,” as an Arabic translator on a base in Iraq. Her job called on her to translate audio and video recordings, in hopes of gathering intelligence, foiling attacks and probing enemy action. She translated bomb plots, beheadings, even in some cases child pornography. As a result, she got an intimate, and dark, perspective on human nature.

Duration: 00:09:50


A Textbook Engineering Failure: The Case of Galloping Gertie

11/7/2017
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In 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge was a state-of-the-art engineering achievement, a dramatic suspension design spanning a strait of Puget Sound. Sure, it had a bit of a "bounce," but the engineers all assured the public that was normal . Only a handful of bridge workers seemed truly alarmed. Then one day, on November 7, a storm kicked up 40 mph winds, and the bridge began to contort. Soon its undulations took on a distinctive, twisting-ribbon pattern that got worse and worse as the winds...

Duration: 00:08:18


Sisters of the Rogue Wave: How a Freak Occurence Changed the Lives of Five Nuns Forever

11/4/2017
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In April of 1977, five nuns took a week-long vacation to Grayland Bea ch State P ark. Just south of Westport on the Washington coast, this park is known for its rolling sand dunes and expansive beaches where drift logs ofte n wash onto the shores. After spending the week cooped up in a camping trailer, the sisters took one last walk when the sun finally came out. That’s where this story begins. In a matter of seconds, water flooded the coastline and with little time to react, two sisters...

Duration: 00:11:16


How a 'Jelly Doughnut' May Explain Why the Universe Exists

11/4/2017
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Jason Detwiler is an assistant professor of physics at the University of Washington, and he’s on the hunt for a natural phenomenon that is insanely rare. It's a specific reaction called neutrinoless double-beta decay -- a term so egg-headed that when he sat down to explain it to Sound Effect host Gabriel Spitzer, Gabriel made him give it a nickname: the “jelly doughnut.” (Perhaps Gabriel was hungry.) There’s a good payoff for this hunt -- if Detwiler does find a "jelly doughnut," it may...

Duration: 00:08:23


What Are The Odds? Sound Effect, Episode 124

11/4/2017
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This week on Sound Effect, our theme is "What Are the Odds?" We'll meet the grandson of Holocaust survivors who calculated the very low probability that he would even be born. Then a typo may have saved Bob Hofferber's life, by keeping him off of a military plane bound for Tacoma in 1952. In another story of the twists of fate, group of nuns walking along a Washington beach are overtaken by a rogue wave, changing their lives and their relationship with God forever. We'll get to know a...

Duration: 00:51:15


Grandson Of Holocaust Survivors Calculates The Improbability Of His Existence

11/4/2017
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Arik Cohen’s grandparents survived the Holocaust, all four of them. The likelihood of that happening is astronomical -- and he has the calculations to prove it. A self-professed geek, Cohen began looking at the history of his family to figure out the statistical odds of each person surviving and contributing to a grandson: himself. Cohen’s crunching of the numbers also allowed him to look closer at four individual tales of survival against the odds.

Duration: 00:03:58


In 1952 a Plane Crashed in Tacoma. A Typo Saved this Man's Life.

11/4/2017
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On 28 th November 1952, a chance occurrence – a clerical error – resulted in Bob Hofferber not catching his scheduled flight from Fort Ladd, Alaska to McChord Field in south Tacoma. It was an error that likely saved his life. The U.S. Air Force C-54G Skymaster crashed on its approach , resulting in the deaths of all but two of the people on board. Bob had spent most of the day checking out of Ladd Air Force Base, where he was coming to the end of an eighteen-month deployment in the Air...

Duration: 00:08:59


How 'War Of The Worlds' Caused Double The Panic For One Small Washington Town

11/4/2017
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The population of Concrete, Washington in 1938 was about 1,000 people. But one October evening that year, while a famous radio broadcast was frightening a good portion of the population across the country, things in Concrete got even stranger. When Orson Wells broadcast his famous War of the Worlds broadcast on October 30, 1938, if you didn’t tune in at the very beginning, you might not have realized it was a radio play, not actual terrifying news of Martians invading earth. But in...

Duration: 00:08:43


Dick Stein's Tales From The Poker Table

11/4/2017
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As part of Sound Effect’s " What Are the Odds?" e pisode, Dick Stein, 88.5’s man of chance and mystery, shares a few stories from his time spent at poker tables. “Poker players hate to get up from the table, God forbid they should miss that hand that will make them a huge score,” said Stein. “So, we do two things: one, cultivate super human bladder control, and two, when we’re hungry we’ll just order something and eat it at the table.” In these vignettes, Stein talks about some of the...

Duration: 00:09:22

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