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Think (KERA)

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Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
More Information

Location:

Dallas, TX

Description:

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Language:

English

Contact:

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard Dallas, Texas 75201 800-933-5372


Episodes

Is Anyone Out There?

10/17/2017
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“Sustainability” is one of the buzz words of the environmental movement. Some scientists are beginning to think, though, that over-population and climate change are actually the natural demise of civilizations – possibly even ones that existed on other planets. Astrophysicist Adam Frank discusses climate change from an interplanetary perspective. He speaks tonight at 5:30 at Dallas Hall on the SMU campus.

Duration: 00:48:26


Clandestine On Campus

10/17/2017
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Intelligence services from Russia, China and other world powers have figured out a way to gain sensitive information about the U.S. from an unlikely place: university campuses. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Daniel Golden talks about how some foreign college students are actually working as spies for their home countries – and about how the FBI and CIA are returning the favor abroad. His new book is called “Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America’s...

Duration: 00:48:28


Not So Golden Years: Seniors On The Road

10/16/2017
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The Great Recession is nearly a decade in the past, but some American workers are still feeling its effect. Jessica Bruder joins us to talk about how the recession created a new breed of migrant worker – primarily older Americans. She tells their story in “Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century” (W.W. Norton and Company).

Duration: 00:48:26


Why Every President Fails

10/16/2017
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The president of the United States is known as the leader of the free world and is also in charge of the world’s largest economy. It’s a lot to put on one person. UT-Austin history professor Jeremi Suri joins us to talk about how the job has grown well beyond what the Founding Fathers conceived – and about how that expanded scope has continuously led to the public’s dissatisfaction. His new book is called “The Impossible Presidency: The Rise and Fall of America’s Highest Office” (Basic...

Duration: 00:48:25


It’s All In Your Head: How Marketers Hijack Our Brains

10/13/2017
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Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that tells our brains we want more of something. It’s what motivates us to act, but if not properly managed, it can push us to addiction and depression. Dr. Robert Lustig joins us to talk about how marketers have learned to activate dopamine in our brains – making us crave their products and leaving us empty in the process. His new book is called “The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains” (Avery).

Duration: 00:48:26


Cassius Clay To Muhammad Ali: Becoming The Champ

10/12/2017
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Muhammad Ali was arguably the most significant sports figure of the 20th Century – a champion in the ring and an important voice outside it. Jonathan Eig joins us to tell the story of a complicated man who so often found himself at the center of America’s most pressing conversations. Eig’s new book is called “Ali: A Life” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).

Duration: 00:48:28


The Kids In The Hall: A Conversation With Dave Foley And Kevin McDonald

10/12/2017
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Canadian sketch-comedy troupe The Kids in the Hall kept early ‘90s audiences in stiches with its off-kilter humor and extended list of recurring characters. Members Dave Foley and Kevin McDonald join us for a conversation about humor while they’re in town to accept the Ernie Kovacs Award from VideoFest.

Duration: 00:48:29


How Leaders Are Made

10/11/2017
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True leaders shine brightest when the stakes are highest. Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn joins us to talk about exceptional leaders throughout history and why they prove that the greatest of leaders aren’t born – they’re made. Her new book is called “Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times” (Scribner).

Duration: 00:48:38


Student Loans: The Debt You Can’t Escape

10/11/2017
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The student loan industry theoretically exists to help young people finance higher education. The country’s mounting student debt, though, is calling into question the industry’s priorities. Reporters Daniel Rivero and Laura Juncadella join us to talk about how predatory lending practices are keeping some graduates from ever crawling out from under student loans. Their yearlong investigation, “The Naked Truth: Debt Trap,” aired recently on Fusion TV.

Duration: 00:48:28


A Homesick Texan Gets Cheesy

10/10/2017
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When Lisa Fain published “The Homesick Texan Cookbook,” she became a hero to Texans searching for the tastes of home outside the Lone Star State. She joins us to talk about the flavors specific to Texas – and about her latest book, “Queso!: Regional Recipes for the World’s Favorite Chile-Cheese Dip” (Ten Speed Press).

Duration: 00:48:29


Bulls, Blood And The Border: A Texas Family’s Story

10/10/2017
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Roger Hodge’s family has made a living for nearly two centuries ranching in Texas. And like other families, his is learning to adjust as the cattle business becomes less of a force. He joins us to talk about pieces of Texas cultural history that are fading away in the 21st Century, which he writes about in “Texas Blood: Seven Generations Among the Outlaws, Ranchers, Indians, Missionaries, Soldiers, and Smugglers of the Borderlands” (Knopf). He speaks tonight as part of Author’s Live! at...

Duration: 00:48:22


Capitalism With Compassion

10/9/2017
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In the last decade, thousands of entrepreneurs have turned profits while also creating businesses that serve the greater good. Nobel Prize-winning economist Muhammad Yunus joins us talk about how we can improve capitalism – and the world in the process – which he writes about in “A World of Three Zeros: The New Economics of Zero Poverty, Zero Unemployment, and Zero Net Carbon Emissions” (PublicAffairs).

Duration: 00:48:22


Decoding Dan Brown

10/6/2017
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With “The Da Vinci Code,” Dan Brown entered the rarified air of J.K. Rowling, Stephen King and John Grisham – authors whose newest books are guaranteed bestsellers. He joins us to talk about his latest, “Origin,” the fifth in his Robert Langdon series. He speaks tonight as part of Arts and Letter Live! at McFarlin Auditorium.

Duration: 00:48:25


Snapshots From Space: An Astronaut’s View Of Earth

10/5/2017
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As commander of the International Space Station, Terry Virts spent more than 200 days floating above and below Earth. And during that time, he took more than 300,000 photos. He joins us to talk about looking at the world from this unique vantage – and about everyday life in orbit. His new book is called “View From Above: An Astronaut Photographs the World” (National Geographic).

Duration: 00:48:34


Presidential Punchlines

10/5/2017
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At 24, David Litt became one of the youngest White House speechwriters in history when he joined the Obama administration. He joins us to talk about the delicate process of writing jokes for the president – and about how Obama used humor to communicate with the American people. Litt writes about his experiences in “Thanks, Obama: My Hopey, Changey White House Years” (Ecco).

Duration: 00:48:30


A Battlefield Doctor’s Story

10/4/2017
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Jon Kerstetter has witnessed war in Rwanda, Kosovo, Bosnia and, ultimately, Iraq as a soldier in the U.S. Army. And while those around him were focused on killing, he was there to heal the wounded. He joins us to talk about saving lives in the world’s deadliest places, which he writes about in “Crossings: A Doctor-Soldier’s Story” (Crown).

Duration: 00:48:23


The Hollywood Star With A Military Mind

10/4/2017
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In the 1940s, Hedy Lamarr built a career in Hollywood after immigrating from Europe. Her lasting contribution to her adopted country, though, is a technological innovation that each of us still uses on a daily basis. Alexandra Dean joins us to tell Lamarr’s remarkable story, which she documents in her new film “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story.” It screens Friday as part of Dallas VideoFest’s DocuFest.

Duration: 00:48:25


Doing Well (And Feeling Bad About It)

10/3/2017
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The ultrawealthy who flaunt their riches are a staple of reality shows and the tabloids. Existing alongside them, though, are equally well-off Americans who really struggle with the moral questions that come with great wealth. Sociologist Rachel Sherman spoke to 50 members of the 1 percent, and she joins us to talk about how they see themselves, which she writes about in “Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence” (Princeton University Press).

Duration: 00:48:23


Black And Bankrupt: The Tilted Scales Of Justice

10/3/2017
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Bankruptcy is designed to help people begin to re-establish firm financial footing. Yet a new investigation shows that black debtors benefit far less from the system than their white counterparts. Paul Kiel joins us to talk about why Southern bankruptcy lawyers are in large part to blame. His story “How the Bankruptcy System Is Failing Black Americans” was written for ProPublica.

Duration: 00:48:23


Humanity At Its Worst: Why We Still Build Concentration Camps

10/2/2017
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Anyone who’s visited Dachau or Auschwitz may be surprised to learn that concentration camps still exist around the world. Andrea Pitzer joins us to talk about how these facilities developed and how nations have justified their use. Her new book is called “One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps” (Little, Brown and Co.). She’ll talk about it tonight at an event sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Dallas-Fort Worth.

Duration: 00:48:27

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