Try Premium for 30 days

Live games for all NFL, MLB, NBA, & NHL teams
Commercial-Free Music
No Display Ads
Think (KERA)-logo

Think (KERA)

7.7K Favorites

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
More Information

Location:

Dallas, TX

Description:

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Language:

English

Contact:

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard Dallas, Texas 75201 800-933-5372


Episodes

Exposing The Photo Archives Of Black History

12/8/2017
More
The New York Times is arguably America’s newspaper of record. And what doesn’t make the cut can be as telling as what does. New York Times photo editor Darcy Eveleigh and contributing writer Rachel Swarns talk about incredible images of 20th Century black life recently discovered in the Times’ archives – and what the decision not to print them says about how we catalog history. The photos are collected in the new book “Unseen: Unpublished Black History from The New York Times Photo Archives”...

Duration: 00:48:26


When The Single Woman Became Glamorous

12/7/2017
More
In 1936, Marjorie Hillis caused a stir when she published “Live Alone and Like It: A Guide for the Extra Woman,” encouraging women to take control of their own lives. Joanna Scutts talks about the lasting effect Hillis’ ideas have had on women. Scutts new book is called “The Extra Woman: How Marjorie Hillis Led a Generation of Women to Live Alone and Like It” (Liveright).

Duration: 00:48:19


Empathy Makes Friends (And Also Enemies)

12/7/2017
More
When we see a football player injured in a game and cringe at the gruesome sight, that’s empathy working within us. And sometimes it’s easier for us to empathize than others. Science writer Lydia Denworth talks about how researchers are studying the way empathy works in the brain. Her story “I Feel Your Pain” appears in the December issue of Scientific American magazine.

Duration: 00:48:22


What The Courts Call Harassment

12/6/2017
More
As allegations of sexual harassment in the work place continue to pile up, it’s inevitable that many of these cases will wind up in court. The case law, however, historically has not been on the accuser’s side. University of Illinois law professor Suja Thomas talks about how these cases work in court. Her piece on the topic appeared recently in The New York Times.

Duration: 00:48:29


Scientists Need The Arts: Here’s Why

12/6/2017
More
One of the traits that’s put humans on the top of the evolutionary heap is our ability to constantly innovate. Rice University professor Anthony Brandt and neuroscientist David Eagleman talk about our innate drive to improve our lives. Their new book is called “The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the World” (Catapult).

Duration: 00:48:23


Inside The Mind Of A.I.

12/5/2017
More
Machines are becoming increasingly accurate in everything from facial recognition to diagnosing cancer. And while these are all technological marvels, it puts the humans who created them in the difficult position of accepting results without truly understanding how they were achieved. Cliff Kuang talks about problems that arise when artificial intelligence outpaces human understanding. His story “Can A.I. be Taught to Explain Itself?” appears in The New York Times magazine.

Duration: 00:48:24


What We Could Have Done After 9/11

12/5/2017
More
As a West Point graduate with tours of Iraq and Afghanistan under his belt, Maj. Danny Sjursen has been a frequent critic of the global war on terror. Still, he says it’s difficult to think that anyone in the White House on Sept. 12, 2001, would have followed a different path. He talks about the past 16 years through the clarity of hindsight, which he writes about for The Nation.

Duration: 00:48:23


What If God Was One of Us?

12/4/2017
More
Reza Aslan made headlines in 2013 with his book “Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth.” He joins us to talk about his latest work of religious scholarship, “God: A Human History” (Random House), in which Aslan digs into the historical desire to humanize the divine.

Duration: 00:48:23


Everybody’s A Cousin

12/4/2017
More
Most of us don’t feel a real familial connection beyond the first few branches of our family trees. A.J. Jacobs, however, has been on a three-year quest to grow the branches of his tree as far and wide as possible. He talks about traveling the world to connect the dots of his far-flung tribe, which he writes about in “It’s All Relative: Adventures Up and Down the World’s Family Tree” (Simon & Schuster).

Duration: 00:48:21


Growing Up Biracial In America: One Woman’s Story

12/1/2017
More
Julie Lythcott-Haims is a hero to many of the parents who read her book “How to Raise an Adult,” which became a bestseller. She joins us to talk about her own upbringing as the child of a black father and white mother, during which she always felt part of “the other.” Her new memoir is called “Real American” (Henry Holt and Co.).

Duration: 00:48:26


How Parents Teach Kids To Disrespect Women

11/30/2017
More
It seems each day brings news of another well-known man brought down by allegations of his own sexual misconduct. And at the heart of this current wave are questions about why these powerful men don’t respect the women they are in contact with. Psychologist Darcy Lockman joins us to talk about the role parents play in how boys value women, which she wrote about recently for the Washington Post.

Duration: 00:48:25


From Oprah To Agassi: How Adversity Has Shaped Great Minds

11/30/2017
More
When it comes to dealing with adversity, many of us keep a stiff upper lip and soldier on. When we hold those experiences inside, though, we miss out on an opportunity to heal. Clinical psychologist Meg Jay joins us to tell the stories of well-known people who’ve overcome adversity – and to talk about what everyday people can learn from those stories. Jay’s new book is called “Supernormal: The Untold Story of Adversity and Resilience” (Twelve).

Duration: 00:48:24


The Nazi Next Door

11/29/2017
More
Andrew Anglin operates the world’s largest neo-Nazi website, The Daily Stormer. His life wasn’t always filled with hate, though. Luke O’Brien joins us to track how Anglin morphed from an antiracist vegan into one of the leading voices of the alt-right. His story “The Making of an American Nazi” appears in The Atlantic.

Duration: 00:48:24


A Father And Son Reconnect Through Literature

11/29/2017
More
As a literature professor, Daniel Mendelsohn teaches the classics. And when his father, Jay, signed up for a class, it provided an opportunity for Daniel to get to know his dad through the works they would explore together. Daniel Mendelsohn joins us to talk about how books can teach us about those closest to us, which he writes about in his new memoir, “An Odyssey: A Father, a Son and an Epic” (Knopf). He speaks tonight at DMA Arts and Letters Live.

Duration: 00:48:24


Communicating With The Unconscious

11/28/2017
More
One of the biggest challenges doctors face is caring for patients with whom they can’t communicate. Science writer Christof Koch joins us for a conversation about how researchers are hopeful that they can soon measure consciousness by zapping the brain with magnetic pulses. His story “How to Make a Consciousness Meter” appears in Scientific American.

Duration: 00:48:25


Washington Post Columnist On Blending Fact And Fiction

11/28/2017
More
By day, David Ignatius is a regarded columnist for the Washington Post who writes about politics and international affairs. By night, though, Ignatius has a career as a writer of a different sort. He joins us to talk about the day’s news – and about his latest novel, “The Quantum Spy” (W.W. Norton and Co.). He’ll talk more about each Wednesday night at the World Affairs Council of Dallas-Fort Worth.

Duration: 00:48:27


New School, New Country: The Life Of A Child Refugee

11/28/2017
More
Every year, child refugees are resettled in America and put into schools charged with bringing them up to speed. Helen Thorpe spent a year tracking refugees at one Denver high school, and she talks with us about the challenges these students face. Her new book is called “The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom” (Scribner).

Duration: 00:48:30


The Broken Brotherhood At American Universities

11/28/2017
More
One of the biggest challenges doctors face is caring for patients with whom they can’t communicate. Science writer Christof Koch joins us for a conversation about how researchers are hopeful that they can soon measure consciousness by zapping the brain with magnetic pulses. His story “How to Make a Consciousness Meter” appears in Scientific American.

Duration: 00:48:25


The Geography Of Happiness

11/21/2017
More
A new study has revealed that Boulder, Colo., is the happiest place in the United States. Guest host Courtney Collins talks about how geography affects our well-being with Dan Buettner. His story “The Search for Happiness” appears in the November issue of National Geographic.

Duration: 00:48:24


Poverty From A Kids Point Of View

11/20/2017
More
Many of the Americans affected most by poverty are children – too young to get jobs and not quite old enough to understand the complex circumstances that contribute to their plight. As part of KERA’s One Crisis Away series, guest host Courtney Collins talks about how poverty affects kids with Jezza Neumann. He’s the producer of the Frontline documentary “Poor Kids,” which airs Wednesday on PBS stations.

Duration: 00:48:26

See More