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Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
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Location:

Dallas, TX

Description:

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Language:

English

Contact:

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard Dallas, Texas 75201 800-933-5372


Episodes

The Problems With Preschool

1/19/2018
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Study after study confirms the important role that preschool plays in a student’s academic success. That significance, though, isn’t reflected in preschool teachers’ paychecks. Jeneen Interlandi joins us to talk about this disconnect – her story “Why Are Our Most Important Teachers Paid the Least?” appears in The New York Times magazine.

Duration: 00:48:27


Borderland Avenger: Creating A Latino Superhero

1/18/2018
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When undocumented immigrants cross the border into the U.S., they can count on Ignacio Rivera to protect them. He’s the superhero of the “El Peso Hero” comic books. The series is written by North Texas teacher Hector Rodriguez, who joins us to talk about creating a character who seeks justice for those without hope.

Duration: 00:48:30


Behind The Scenes Of Obama’s Last Year

1/18/2018
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For U.S. diplomats, 2016 began as a year spent putting the finishing touches on President Obama’s global policies. And when they learned that Hillary Clinton would not be moving into the White House, those same State Department workers began a race against time to lock in their achievements. Their efforts are captured in a documentary called “The Final Year,” and we talk with director Greg Barker about traveling the world with Samantha Power, John Kerry and other key figures.

Duration: 00:48:32


How To Read A Taco

1/17/2018
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In 2018, tacos feel as American as hamburgers and apple pie. And in tracing the taco’s path to integration, it’s also possible to study the paths of the people who brought them here. St. John’s University assistant professor Steven Alvarez covers these ideas in a course he teaches called “Taco Literacy,” and he joins us to talk about what can be learned about Mexican immigrants through the food they eat and share.

Duration: 00:48:26


One Of The Little Rock Nine Remembers

1/17/2018
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Melba Pattillo Beals became a Civil Rights hero in 1957 when she was one of nine black students who integrated Central High School in Little Rock. She joins us to talk about that day – and about barriers to equality that remain. Her memoir is called “I Will Not Fear: My Story of a Lifetime of Building Faith Under Fire” (Revell).

Duration: 00:48:32


Where In The World Is God?

1/16/2018
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For people unsure about religion, the prospect of having to chart a spiritual course for a child can push some future parents to examine their belief systems. That was the case for Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google who learned she couldn’t just find her answers online. She joins us to talk about visiting shamans, witches, faith healers and many other figures on her quest for answers, which she writes about in “Stalking God: My Unorthodox Search for Something to Believe In” (Da Capo Press).

Duration: 00:48:28


Be Good For Goodness’ Sake

1/16/2018
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Impulse control is a common trait among high achievers. Psychologist David DeSteno joins us to talk about how the use of social emotions factor into our abilities to persevere and make the most of our lives. His new book is called “Emotional Success: The Power of Gratitude, Compassion, and Pride”(Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).

Duration: 00:48:30


Let’s Talk About Race

1/15/2018
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Productive conversations about race tend to break down into more focused discussions of privilege, police brutality, academic opportunity and other topics. Ijeoma Oluo joins us to talk about those issues and many others. Her new book is called “So You Want to Talk About Race” (Seal Press).

Duration: 00:48:27


Hooked: Understanding Addiction

1/15/2018
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Addiction is a part of life that affects nearly every family. This hour on Think, we explore the topic with a former heroin addict, a historian who writes about America’s relationship with alcohol and a neuroscientist who studies the brains of addicts.

Duration: 00:48:25


Why You’re Probably Not Seeing This Post: The Web After Net Neutrality

1/12/2018
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In December, the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal what’s known as net neutrality, meaning the Federal government will no longer regulate the Internet as a utility. Klint Finley of Wired magazine joins us to talk about how the decision will change the way we interact online with businesses – and each other.

Duration: 00:48:28


Reading Between The Tweets: Covering The White House In The Social Media Age

1/11/2018
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Each day, producers at CNN, NPR, Fox News and other media outlets wake up and immediately check Twitter to gauge how a tweet from the president might rearrange their days. SMU assistant professor Stephanie A. Martin joins us to talk about how social media has changed the way the media covers the White House. She’s the editor of “Columns to Characters: The Presidency and the Press Enter the Digital Age” (Texas A&M University Press).

Duration: 00:48:28


The All-Star Scientists Who Defeated The Nazis

1/11/2018
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In the early days of World War II, Alfred Lee Loomis made a fortune on Wall Street. And with that money, he funded a team of scientists charged with developing radar into a weapon that would defeat the Axis Powers. The story is told in the new American Experience documentary “The Secret of Tuxedo Park,” and director Rob Rapley joins us to talk about the outsized influence these relatively unknown men had on the outcome of the war. The film airs Jan. 16 at 8 on KERA-TV.

Duration: 00:48:30


When Sex Got Political

1/10/2018
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About a century ago, liberal Protestants started to disagree with more conservative Christians over issues related to sexuality. R. Marie Griffith, director of the Danforth Center on Religion at Washington University in St. Louis, joins us to talk about how this split set the stage for many of the cultural battles still fought today. Her new book is called “Moral Combat: How Sex Divided American Christians & Fractured American Politics” (Basic Books).

Duration: 00:48:28


Opening Yourself Up For Trouble: The Untested World Of Medical Devices

1/10/2018
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One of every 10 Americans is walking around with a pacemaker, artificial knee or some other medical device implanted inside them. And the owners of these pieces of equipment might be horrified to know that they underwent little – if any – clinical trials before being inserted into their new owners. Jeanne Lenzer joins us to talk about the lack of oversight in the industry, which she writes about in “The Danger Within Us: America’s Untested, Unregulated Medical Device Industry and One Man’s...

Duration: 00:48:31


A Modern China Through One Family’s Eyes

1/9/2018
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Scott Tong’s parents fled communist China six decades ago for a new life in the United States. And when Tong was sent to Shanghai to open the “Marketplace” China bureau, it offered him a chance to learn more about what – and who – his parents left behind. Tong joins us to talk about the country’s modernization through the eyes of family members who experienced it, which he writes about in “A Village With My Name: A Family History of China’s Opening to the World” (University of Chicago Press).

Duration: 00:48:34


Why Your City Can Solve The World’s Problems

1/9/2018
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As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, cities – not nations – are seeing their power grow. That’s according to Bruce Katz, a global urbanization expert at the Brookings Institution. He joins us to talk about how cities can tackle everything from economic disparity to environmental sustainability, which he and co-author Jeremy Nowak write about in “The New Localism: How Cities Can Thrive in the Age of Populism” (Brookings).

Duration: 00:48:38


How Social Media Is Revolutionizing The Middle East

1/8/2018
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Social media networks have been a major driver of change in the Muslim word – facilitating everything from the Arab Spring to ISIS. Haroon K. Ullah, a former advisor to three secretaries of state, joins us to talk about the impact of online networks in the Middle East and elsewhere, which he writes about in “Digital World War: Islamists, Extremists, and the Fight for Cyber Supremacy” (Yale University Press).

Duration: 00:48:29


Bitcoin And The Digital Currency Revolution

1/8/2018
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One Bitcoin is currently worth about $15,000. How could something that relatively few people understand become so valuable? Jen Schwartz, an expert on what’s known as blockchain technology, joins us to explain how Bitcoin works and to talk about if it’s here to stay. She edited a special report on digital currency that appears in the January issue of Scientific American magazine.

Duration: 00:48:27


Our Every Move Is Tracked — And Why We’re OK With That

1/5/2018
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With our cell phones, computer histories and security cameras, someone out there knows where we are and what we’re doing nearly every minute of the day. UT-Austin American studies professor Randolph Lewis joins guest host Lauren Silverman to talk about the human cost of constant tracking, which he writes about in “Under Surveillance: Being Watched in Modern America” (University of Texas Press).

Duration: 00:48:28


Jellyfish: A 500-Million-Year Mystery

1/4/2018
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Jellyfish get a bad rap – they sting us when we’re at the beach, clog power plants and harm fisheries. Still, you’ve got to respect the fact that they’ve navigated our oceans for more than 500 million years. Juli Berwald joins guest host Lauren Silverman to talk about these fascinating creatures and her study of them across the world. Her new book is called “Spineless: The Science of Jellyfish and the Art of Growing a Backbone” (Riverhead Books).

Duration: 00:48:28

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