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Ideas

CBC Podcasts & Radio On-Demand

IDEAS is a deep-dive into contemporary thought and intellectual history. No topic is off-limits. In the age of clickbait and superficial headlines, it's for people who like to think.

IDEAS is a deep-dive into contemporary thought and intellectual history. No topic is off-limits. In the age of clickbait and superficial headlines, it's for people who like to think.

Location:

Canada, ON

Description:

IDEAS is a deep-dive into contemporary thought and intellectual history. No topic is off-limits. In the age of clickbait and superficial headlines, it's for people who like to think.

Twitter:

@CBCradio

Language:

English

Contact:

Ideas CBC Radio P.O. Box 500 Station A Toronto, ON Canada, M5W 1E6 (416) 205-3700


Episodes

What is Common? And What is Good?

8/3/2021
The Haitian Revolution of 1791 gave birth to ideas about Black liberation and the common good that went on to inform freedom struggles throughout the Black Atlantic. IDEAS traces that lineage and how it connects to today's Black Lives Matter movement. *This episode aired on April 6, 2021, and is part of our series, The Common Good.

Duration:00:55:33

Common Good | Commanding Hope: Thomas Homer-Dixon

7/30/2021
Climate activist Greta Thunberg once declared that she doesn’t want hope, unless it translates into action. Political scientist Thomas Homer-Dixon shares his ideas on how hope can galvanize concrete change. *This episode is part of our series, Common Good. This episode originally aired on November 26, 2020.

Duration:00:55:34

Separated at Rebirth: Science and Religion

7/28/2021
With the rise of mindfulness and the growth of brain research, Buddhism and science have become fast friends. Philosopher Evan Thompson is skeptical about the contemporary characterization of Buddhism. His latest book, Why I Am Not a Buddhist, offers both a critique of Buddhist exceptionalism, and a way forward for our globalized and diverse culture. This episode originally aired on October 2, 2021.

Duration:00:55:32

In Defence of Domestic Workers: Adelle Blackett

7/27/2021
Professor Adelle Blackett is the chief legal architect behind the International Labour Organization's first comprehensive standards offering protections and rights to more than 60 million domestic workers. In her public lecture to Cornell University, the Canada Research Chair in Transnational Law at McGill University addresses why we urgently need to bring equality to the household workplace. This episode originally aired on February 1, 2021.

Duration:00:55:34

The 99% Invisible City: Roman Mars

7/26/2021
For the last decade, Roman Mars has been exploring the hidden stories behind architecture and design in his podcast 99% Invisible. He speaks with Nahlah Ayed about how learning to read the secret language of cities reveals reasons for delight all around us, why he sees cities as ‘evolving organisms,’ and how war and disease shape the built environment. This episode originally aired on February 9, 2021.

Duration:00:55:33

BBC Reith Lectures: Mark Carney, Part Three

7/23/2021
In our final episode of Mark Carney’s 2020 BBC Reith Lectures, the economist and former governor of the Banks of England and Canada, focuses on how the ultimate test of a more fair economy will be how it addresses the growing climate crisis. This episode originally aired on February 24, 2021.

Duration:00:55:31

BBC Reith Lectures: Mark Carney, Part Two

7/22/2021
2020 BBC Reith Lecturer Mark Carney continues his lecture series entitled, ‘How We Get What We Value.’ In this episode, the former bank governor focuses on the 2008 financial crisis and the ongoing impact of the pandemic. This episode originally aired on February 23, 2021.

Duration:00:54:33

BBC Reith Lectures: Mark Carney, Part One

7/21/2021
Mark Carney is the 2020 Reith Lecturer, the BBC’s flagship lecture series. In his lectures entitled, 'How We Get What We Value,' he argues the worlds of finance, economics, and politics have too often prioritized financial values, over human ones. The future depends on reversing that shift. In lecture one, he addresses the changing nature of value — and how we've come to equate 'value' to what is profitable. This episode originally aired on February 22, 2021.

Duration:00:55:23

The Rising Star of Judith Shklar, the skeptical liberal

7/20/2021
Why it matters to say ‘cruelty is the worst thing that we do’ according to fans of Judith Shklar, political philosopher. This episode originally aired on January 14, 2021

Duration:00:55:34

Notes From Utopia: The Arab Spring 10 years on

7/19/2021
Ten years ago, the Middle East was in convulsions as protesters attempted revolution in several countries. Looking back, what can we learn from those experiments in human collaboration? This episode aired on January 26, 2021.

Duration:00:55:28

The Buffalo, Part Three

7/16/2021
The Buffalo — a three-part series that originally aired in 1992 — tells the story of a magnificent animal, and of the people who lived with the buffalo. It's also the story of survivors, of the Indigenous people who continue to revere the buffalo and who fight to save the one remaining herd, now threatened with extermination. The series is narrated by novelist, Thomas King. This episode aired on October 7, 2020.

Duration:00:55:23

The Buffalo, Part Two

7/15/2021
In the foothills of the Rockies, you'll find a cliff rising 11 metres from the ground called Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump, in Alberta. For more than 5,000 years, Indigenous peoples of the plains used this site to kill buffalo. It's a place deeply connected to Indigenous history and practice. Novelist Thomas King, narrates this second in a three-part series on the Buffalo, originally broadcast in 1992. This episode aired on September 30, 2020.

Duration:00:54:09

The Buffalo, Part One

7/15/2021
In the mid-1870s, buffalo roamed across North America in the millions. A few short decades later, there were only 300 left. Using both science and storytelling, this series tells the story of the buffalo and its relationship to the Indigenous people who revere it. (This series originally aired in 1992 and is narrated by novelist, Thomas King.) This episode aired on September 23, 2020.

Duration:00:54:09

Cowboy's Lament, Part One

7/12/2021
The potent Images of the cowboy and the six shooter have shaped the myth of the American West: pioneer freedom and frontier towns. In this first episode of a two-part series, IDEAS contributor Tom Jokinen explores the myth of the West, and how the values of individual freedom and boundless conquest continue to feed America's political ideology through to today. This episode originally aired on October 15, 2020.

Duration:00:55:28

Common Good | The Politics of Belonging

7/9/2021
Left-wing and right-wing governments around the world have fallen into the same trap, a failure of leadership to inspire a cohesive vision of society that ordinary citizens can share. What is to be done? Author George Monbiot joins Nahlah Ayed to point toward a new way of conceptualizing the common good, and forging a politics of belonging. *This episode originally aired on Sept. 11, 2020 and is part of our series, Common Good.

Duration:00:55:41

Common Good | The Good Ancestor

7/5/2021
In calling on us to be good ancestors, public philosopher Roman Krznaric is trying to give the discussion about the future a language, an address and a face: introducing us to all the people already working to formalize the practice of thinking long-term for the common good, benefiting both present and future generations.*This episode originally aired on Sept. 7, 2020 and is part of our series, The Common Good.

Duration:00:55:42

Roxane Gay: A Fierce and Vital Voice

7/2/2021
Warning: Content includes rape and profanity | Roxane Gay likes to joke that even her opinions have opinions — which comes in handy for her column in The New York Times. The Haitian-American writer is fond of dark explorations, but her work can also be funny and erotic. IDEAS Producer Mary Lynk speaks with the formidable Ms. Gay about racism, surviving rape and what she calls the 'fetishizing of forgiveness.' *This episode originally aired on November 17, 2020.

Duration:00:55:34

The Complexity of Cuteness

6/30/2021
The charms of cuteness seem obvious. Yet, from the Japanese fear of adulting to universal attractions of indeterminacy, the new field of Cute Studies reveals layers beneath a fluffy surface.*This episode originally aired on November 23, 2020.

Duration:00:55:32

The Flip Side of History: the Aztecs through their own words

6/29/2021
Forget history written by the victors. Cundill Prize-winning historian Camilla Townsend turned to annals kept by the Aztecs themselves to reveal a history of a vibrant, sophisticated people who valued hard word, perseverance, who were master storytellers and loved a good joke — and who 500 years ago had outdoor food courts! *This episode originally aired on December 3, 2020.

Duration:00:55:26

Welcome to the Technate

6/28/2021
The 20th century has seen capitalism, communism, socialism, and various other "isms" come and go. But Technocracy Inc. had its own vision to replace them: a technologically-driven society that would be perfectly egalitarian, productive and healthy. Its following was massive. Contributor Ira Basen brings us this documentary on the legacy of Technocracy Inc.

Duration:00:55:34