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The Messy Studio with Rebecca Crowell

Arts & Culture Podcasts

Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every weekend!

Location:

United States

Description:

Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every weekend!

Language:

English


Episodes
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Episode 269: Influences and Copying

5/7/2024
All artists are influenced by others, but when an artist has an authentic voice, their influences are well-integrated with their own unique vision. But sometimes the influence from another artist is so strong that the boundaries between the two are blurred. Today we’ll talk about being influenced by other artists -- when it is too much, and what it means when another artist is being copied. We’ll also mention ways that influence can constructive and positive and part of an authentic creative voice. Influence itself isn’t a bad thing—in fact it’s a given as part of creativity. Creativity doesn’t exist in a vacuum, and as artists we are naturally inspired by other artists past and present, and interested in and inspired by what they do. But there is a point when influence is too much, and you are taking liberties with someone else's work. While over-influence is somewhat expected when you are in a learning phase, as you mature as an artist it is expected that you move into your own territory. Some strong resemblance to another artist's work can be understood as unconscious and even as parallel development. But if you want your work to be distinctive, you need to confront the possibility of being mistaken for the other artist or vice versa. And if you're consciously copying, it's not fair to you and your development, and not fair to the artist whose ideas you are replicating. You may rationalize this as being less well known than the other artist, or even as flattering to them. There are other problematic reasons such as not wanting to put in the work necessary to develop your own voice or wanting to ride into the art market on someone else's path. To avoid having your work resemble someone else's work too much, it's helpful to have a large mix of influences rather than taking too much form any one artist. In that way, your influences can be compared to the various flavors you combine when cooking a complex dish, which has a unique taste as a result. You can also work with ideas that you perceive or interpret in an artist's work rather than adopting the look of their work as a whole. This is an important way to synthesize various influences so that you avoid too much visual resemblance. And most importantly, remember that your strongest influences should be the most personal, coming from your own thoughts, interests, and experiences. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? What's new at Cold Wax Academy? You can now join the membership program on a month-to-month basis with full streaming access to all the great features offered, including Rebecca and Jerry's full-length video workshop and Jerry's Mentoring Messages and 12 Essential Lessons. Monthly memberships mean lots more flexibility for you--you can try the program out for a short time, or take a break when you need it. Live sessions will continue twice a month--and along with favorites like painting clinics, critiques, and guests, and as always, everything is recorded and available in the Member Library. And there's more exciting news! Rebecca and Jerry have just announced the first ever online international exhibit of work created with cold wax medium. All styles and formats are welcome. The juror for the show is Dan Addington, of Addington Gallery in Chicago. To learn more, go to www.coldwaxacademy.com-- and click on the Call for Art button....

Duration:00:33:46

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Episode 268: What are Your Boundaries?

3/13/2024
What sorts of boundaries do you put around your studio practice? What new ideas are you willing–or not willing—to explore in your work? We all have limited time and energy, so how do you decide where to focus? Which new materials, media, or directions are worth pursuing? It’s a part of learning to sometimes spend time and resources on things that are off track or don’t really suit you. And a basic openness to change and growth is a very good attitude. But, letting yourself be pulled too often in different directions can keep you from committing to deeper involvement. Today we’ll talk about boundaries that are useful and encourage growth, along with thoughts about those that are either too tight or too loose. When do boundaries make complete sense, and bring about focus and development in one area, and when is it good to let go of some of them and open new phases of our work? The answer is unique to you as an individual, but a key factor is if you have a solid base from which you can branch out. Every creative idea potentially has multiple forms of expression. Is it the right time to explore some new aspects of your work? Some people are very drawn to whatever is novel. New materials, processes, techniques, and ideas can be a strong pull. But any change in your process takes time and energy, and it's worth giving some time and consideration to whether to take on something new. Are you avoiding commitment and going deeply into your ideas? Or you may be a person who sets very narrow boundaries about what new approaches you will explore. There may be a fear of losing sales or simply of failing at a new venture. A good middle ground is being open to change and willing to follow through on changes that seem worthwhile. Understanding your own position about boundaries requires looking at yourself honestly, and you may find a solid base that you didn't even recognize. It’s a challenge to find the right balance of being open to new directions and being committed to certain ideas. But that point of balance is also very exciting and rewarding. It means you are heading purposefully in direction you've identified as helpful but there are surprises and good energy along the way. You’re excited by new challenges but also understanding how various ideas fit together, and seeing that the basic connection you have with your ideas is solid. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? What's new at Cold Wax Academy? You can now join the membership program on a month-to-month basis with full streaming access to all the great features offered, including Rebecca and Jerry's full-length video workshop and Jerry's Mentoring Messages and 12 Essential Lessons. Monthly memberships mean lots more flexibility for you--you can try the program out for a short time, or take a break when you need it. Live sessions will continue twice a month--and along with favorites like painting clinics, critiques, and guests, and as always, everything is recorded and available in the Member Library. And there's more exciting news! Rebecca and Jerry have just announced the first ever online international exhibit of work created with cold wax medium. All styles and formats are welcome. The juror for the show is Dan Addington, of Addington Gallery in Chicago. To learn more, go to www.coldwaxacademy.com-- and click on the Call for Art button. While you...

Duration:00:31:27

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Episode 267: Questions for the New Year

1/8/2024
It's once again the time of year when many of us make resolutions and set goals. We’ve talked about goals and plans at the start of the year in previous podcasts, but in this episode, we would like to recognize that sometimes having questions about what lies ahead is just as important. The nature of creative work means focusing on what we don’t know as much or more than what we do know. Most goals and resolutions are based on a logical evaluation of what we want to accomplish—and there’s nothing wrong with that. But today we’re going to talk about the importance of generating questions as much as we do goals and resolutions. We base many goals for our life and work on assumptions about what seems like the right thing to do according to outside standards. But as artists we have a lot of independence and autonomy, and a big part of setting your own course is considering what’s right for yourself as an individual. It's also important when setting goals to leave plenty of room for the unexpected, and for exploring things you haven’t even thought about. Underneath any practical goal or resolution is a question about why it is important. What is the motivation for making this resolution? Is it something you truly want, or is it instead something you simply believe is expected of you? It’s interesting to go to this deeper level with questions and see what you discover. You might find a clear and honest reason for your resolution, or you may discover that you lack a personal connection or motivation. There is also a problem with setting precise goals and resolutions in an art practice in that there are always unexpected changes and opportunities. The conventional approach may keep you from exploring the more meandering path that many artists find valuable. One of the joys of the art life is that you have the freedom to find the path that suits your own approach and focus. At this time of year it's good to give thought to what is right for you and get rid of any “shoulds” that are causing you grief. Goals and resolutions are best when they are personal and as flexible as possible, to allow for the unexpected. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? There are some important changes as 2024 gets underway! The big news is that Rebecca and Jerry have restructured their membership program and now you can join on a month-to-month basis with full streaming access to all features of the program. This means lots more flexibility for you--you can try the program out for a short time, or take a break when you need it. Live sessions will continue twice a month--and along with favorites like painting clinics, critiques, and guests, some new and exciting plans are in the works. Make 2024 your year to discover the excitement of working with cold wax -- or if you are already a member, to go even deeper into your painting practice. For more info and to join CWA please visit www.coldwaxacademy.com ​ Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. ​ Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all their knowledge and encouragement is a gift in...

Duration:00:31:45

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Episode 266: Gratitude and the Artist's Life

11/24/2023
This is the traditional time of year to focus on gratitude for the blessings in our lives. And while gratitude can and should cover a lot of areas of life, since this podcast is mainly aimed at artists, today we’re going to consider some of the ways that we as artists can be uniquely grateful. These include being thankful for being able to do our work, for those who appreciate it, for opportunities that come our way, and for the personal growth we gain from creative practice. Art adds a dimension to our lives that is deeply satisfying and affirming, whether we do it mainly for ourselves or whether we bring it to the wider world or even make a career of it. Today we want to focus on gratitude for the ability and the passion we have for making art. Spending some time to write about what your art practice means to you is a meaningful way to explore your grateful feelings for your art practice and the creative aspects of your life. We can all get caught up in the ups and downs of the daily situation in the studio but taking a pause to acknowledge its special importance to you is uplifting. This can include looking back to times when challenges and difficulties in your creative life have led to positive outcomes, and the ways that you have grown as a person as a result. Perseverance, trust, and belief in yourself can build up over time as you involve yourself in your work. Gratitude can extend not only to what comes to us in personal ways but also to what we are able to share. Making art can be seen as a way of loving the larger world when you do it with a sense of gratitude and when you offer others a bit of your sense of beauty and rightness. Whether it is through exhibiting, teaching, writing, or speaking about your work, you can be grateful for having something meaningful to share with others. The list of things for which an artist can be thankful is long; each of us has our own specific or personal thoughts and experiences, but there are also more universal aspects of the creative life that can be acknowledged. No matter what role art plays in your own life, it enhances your life now and on into the future with its benefits of ongoing involvement and healthy aging. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? Fall quarter is now underway with sessions on Texture, Materiality and Process, Finding Time for your Work, a return visit with Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin, a painting clinic for works in progress, and the quarterly member critique. As always, Members are encouraged to take part in the online sessions, where lively discussions take place as Rebecca and Jerry respond in real time, But if you can't make it to the live sessions, remember that Cold Wax Academy Members have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions --and now you can navigate the extensive range of topics with an index to easily find what you need. By the way, you don't have to use cold wax medium to benefit from the content in these recordings. Artists who use other painting media will also find a wealth of valuable information --including effective use of the visual elements and composition, personal voice and intentions, mentoring topics like procrastination and work/life balance--and much, much more. For more info and to join CWA please visit www.coldwaxacademy.com ​ Please visit...

Duration:00:27:02

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Episode 265: Studio Tour Tips

11/11/2023
Podcast: Studio Tours Being part of a studio tour is a unique opportunity to show your work in the one place where you feel most at home with your work, and where you have total control over what to show and how it will be displayed. It’s a time when you can meet people who are excited about what you do and of course, make direct sales and helpful connections. Especially when your open studio is part of an organized and publicized regional event, you can expect a steady flow of visitors, and the sales that result can be significant. What do you need to do to prepare for being part of a studio tour or open studio event? How can you maximize sales and connections, and keep your energy during all the preparations and planning? Today we’ll talk about some tips and considerations, and ideas for making things run smoothly. The most important thing to remember is to pace yourself, because there’s a lot to do to get ready, and many different tasks to keep track of. But doing a little each day for about four-six weeks ahead relieves a lot of stress. Small accomplishments add up! The following is a list of tasks and the suggested schedule for getting ready for the big days. Starting 4-6 weeks ahead • Send out newsletter with all your info, and some photos of some of the work you will be selling. You will have a decent mailing list for this if you’ve been keeping a sign-up guest book each time you have had an open studio event in the past. If not, use whatever emails you have collected via other methods. • Order new business cards if you need them, and maybe post cards or brochures. • Start promoting on social media—you can post what you are working on for the tour, pictures of your studio, etc. • Evaluate your inventory –will you show older work, only newer work, or a combination? o Are there gaps you want to fill? You still have time to make new work. o Do you have various price points for your work? Higher prices are not a bad thing if you have a track record, but some lower prices are also good. o Are there pieces that need to be touched up, cleaned up, or worked over? o Decide if you need any mats or frames—you should go for the best presentation you can reasonably afford. Off the shelf frames are fine—if you have things that will look best frames, frame at least a few so people can see how they will look. • Order any other supplies you need for wrapping and protecting work that you sell, like bubble wrap and cardboard. • Pricing—think about this as you go along, don’t leave to the very end especially if you plan to make some changes. Sit with your decisions for a while. Be wary of pricing too low. If you’re not sure, get some input from a friend or two. • Consider what help you will need—if any—on the days of the tour and if you want help, line someone up now to give them plenty of a heads up. You might think about help for parking, wrapping work, watching over the food table, or just someone to keep you company and give you a break. • If the studio is a group event help out willingly and where you can—you may have an assigned job or make other efforts where you see the need, like picking up trash on your street. About 2 weeks ahead— • Start cleaning and organizing if you have a messy studio. • Put fresh paint your display walls and hang your work even if it isn’t really ready. That helps give you a view of how your studio will look and you can see what you have at a glance and what work needs attention. Consider how to group things and organize so it feels welcoming. • Think about what food/drinks to serve—you can go easy on yourself by using packaged food or be more elaborate, but it is good to have something. • Make sure you have a guest book, and a receipt book if you want to use one (handy for your own records.) • Check that your Square account for credit cards and your Venmo account if you have one are working well—remember it is good to have several payment methods available. • Keep up with your promotion on your social...

Duration:00:41:44

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Episode 264: Interpreting Experience: Abstract Approaches

10/18/2023
We may think of abstract painting as exploring the visual elements and the process of painting strictly for their own sakes, but that’s only one kind of abstract work. Many abstract artists have a more personal approach, in which aspects of their lives, memories and experiences fuel their work. They want to feel a direct connection between their inner lives and what they create. But finding ways to interpret these personal sources in abstract terms is a big challenge. Without obvious subject matter, how can you express an experience, tell a personal story, or evoke a memory? Today we’ll talk about some approaches to abstraction when very personal expression is the goal. if you are an artist seeking this kind of personal involvement with your abstract work, a key is developing a meaningful visual language that feels connected to your own experiences. Personal visual language means the way you use the visual elements and composition that are most expressive to you. This can include certain color combinations or textural effects, kinds of mark-making, and considerations of scale or format. This is the result of lot of practice, building up aspects of it over time. Working in a personal way with abstraction has limitations in how specific you can be in conveying your ideas. You might think of the process as setting a stage that invites your viewer into a certain evocative realm, for example something organic or nature-related, or a something that seems architectural. But a challenge in developing abstraction with personal meaning includes avoiding literal depiction and insisting on a particular interpretation. It's very easy to slide into imagery even if you decide you want to avoid that; finding a context for your ideas that is consistent in its degree of abstraction is important. Finding the essence of experiences, places, objects, or other subject matter is an important aspect of personally expressive abstraction. Essence means the most basic and pervasive qualities of something, the distillation of an idea. It’s typically the motivation behind wanting your work to be more abstract, because it helps your own responses to your subject be more powerful. You can express essence via any of the visual elements that seem related, and you can use them freely in compositions that are not literal in their depiction. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? Fall quarter is now underway with sessions on Texture, Materiality and Process, Finding Time for your Work, a return visit with Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin, a painting clinic for works in progress, and the quarterly member critique. As always, Members are encouraged to take part in the online sessions, where lively discussions take place as Rebecca and Jerry respond in real time, But if you can't make it to the live sessions, remember that Cold Wax Academy Members have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions --and now you can navigate the extensive range of topics with an index to easily find what you need. By the way, you don't have to use cold wax medium to benefit from the content in these recordings. Artists who use other painting media will also find a wealth of valuable information --including effective use of the visual elements and composition, personal voice and intentions, mentoring topics like procrastination...

Duration:00:35:01

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Episode 263: After The Exhibit

8/28/2023
It’s what so many artists work toward—a solo exhibit or small group show-- when a large body of work is shown at its best, to an appreciative audience. Preparation for an exhibit like that can take months, even years. Slowly you produce the work, experiencing everything from panic to satisfaction as the finished pieces for your exhibit accumulate. It can be both a draining and exhilarating experience as you head toward the finish line. Finally, your show opens, and then what? You have a few weeks or a month of receiving congratulations and feedback, hoping for sales, celebrating when they happen, and then rather suddenly, it’s all over. Today we’ll talk about the aftermath of an exhibit, a time to process what you’ve accomplished and consider what’s next. Exhibits are milestones in your art career, and it's important to take some time to process your accomplishment, by observing how you feel about the work that was exhibited. Take some time to appreciate seeing the work as a body, hanging together, and to consider what might be next. What has changed in your vision and intentions? Many artists also experience a lull or creative block following the big push of having an exhibit. Although this can be frustrating, this downtime can also be beneficial as a time to rest and find your way back into your work. You may need to step back to gather new ideas and energy. Keep your long-term goals in mind but allow yourself some time off. The issues of sales also tends to occupy you in the post-exhibit period. Friends will inquire, and your own finances may cause you to feel anxious about having some income from the show. But try to remember that sales are not the measure of a good exhibit. There are too many factors influencing whether sales happen to use them as a gauge of success. Nobody but the artist really understands everything that goes into producing an exhibit. Your own perspective is the most important and that needs to be focused on the big picture of your work, what you've learned and where your work may be heading. There can be a lot of distractions around a show—sales, publicity, contacts, exposure. A lot of that is exciting and can lead to new opportunities, but in the end, you go back to your studio and work. You are not the same artist you were before you went through this process, and it's time to move on. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? As Rebecca and Jerry enter the fourth year of live programming, they are bringing a special emphasis to reviewing and consolidating prior learning, as well as to increased member involvement on a variety of topics like professional development, mentoring issues, and other questions posed to the group. As always, Members are also encouraged to take part in the online sessions, where lively discussions take place as Rebecca and Jerry respond in real time, And don't forget that Cold Wax Academy Members have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions covering a broad range of topics. You don't have to use cold wax medium to benefit from the content in these recordings. Artists who use other painting media will also find a wealth of valuable information there, from the effective use of the visual elements and composition, to personal voice and intentions, to personal issues like procrastination and work/life balance--and much,...

Duration:00:31:26

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Episode 262: Self Promotion For The Reticent

8/15/2023
If you’re an artist who wants to get your work out into the world to be seen, appreciated, and even purchased, you will face the need for self-promotion. If that idea makes you squirm, you are not alone --and this podcast is for you. Why do so many artists hate the idea of promoting themselves? Probably because many of us were taught from an early age to be modest, to avoid mentioning our achievements, and to be grateful for whatever life handed us without seeking more. But dealing with the art world requires a different approach. You need to let people know who you are and what you do if you want to advance your career. Today we’ll talk about ways of self-promotion that may be comfortable even if you have a reserved, humble, or quiet personality. If self-promotion is stressful to you, you may be struggling with overcoming these early lessons. Or you may have a truly humble or quiet personality that you're happy with, but it holds you back from things you need to do to get your work into the world. However, self-promotion does not mean you have to change who you are. In fact, the best way to handle it is to be yourself, and not present yourself in a way you believe will impress others. If your true personality is low-key or reserved, that is the tone to use in your self-promotion. That doesn't mean being self-deprecating, which is never helpful, or on the other hand exaggerating your achievements. Being honest and direct is the key. Although avoiding self-promotion may be an ingrained habit, you need to acknowledge that it is necessary to operate in the art world. Your potential collectors and others in the position to help you want to know about you and what you do. A confident attitude is important in these situations, whether you are crafting a written statement or speaking in person. If you have trouble with this, remember that sticking to facts about yourself and your achievements is a safe and comfortable entry point. Simply stating these in a straightforward manner is never objectionable to other people. Different types of self-promotion require different approaches, so it helps to know what is expected in each situation. This can range from a formal communication like a press release to something that is less formal, like a blog or newsletter. Lots of times you have some leeway in how to phrase things or how personal to make them, and you can find a tone that suits your true self. With practice, all types of self-promotion become easier to tackle. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? As Rebecca and Jerry enter the fourth year of live programming, they are bringing a special emphasis to reviewing and consolidating prior learning, as well as to increased member involvement on a variety of topics like professional development, mentoring issues, and other questions posed to the group. As always, Members are also encouraged to take part in the online sessions, where lively discussions take place as Rebecca and Jerry respond in real time, And don't forget that Cold Wax Academy Members have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions covering a broad range of topics. You don't have to use cold wax medium to benefit from the content in these recordings. Artists who use other painting media will also find a wealth of valuable information there, from the effective use of...

Duration:00:31:22

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Episode 261: Moving Your Studio: Emotions and Memories

8/1/2023
In our last episode we talked about some of the practicalities of downsizing, clearing out, or moving your studio, and tips about ways to deal with your artwork, supplies, and other items that you’ve accumulated. But what about the emotional side of this? We’re going to focus today on how it feels to move out of a studio that has been a very important part of your life. You may be on top of the logistics involved in dealing with downsizing, but you are not a robot, mechanically sorting and tossing. Today we’ll talk about the fact that your studio is a very personal place that can evoke a flood of memories and emotions when you need to leave it behind. And we’ll also mention the benefits and positive aspects of going through this process. A studio is a place to make your work, but it's also much more. It is a sanctuary and refuge, and a place of contemplation where you have spent countless hours working, thinking, and observing your work. Your studio represents your personal history as an artist and all its ups and downs. So it’s no wonder we get attached to our studios as well as fill them with a large buildup of objects and inventory. The physical objects themselves hold memories and feelings that can be overwhelming at times. Pressure to meet moving deadlines, confronting your habits of hoarding or over-purchasing art supplies, and perhaps regrets over work that was never finished or sold that can all be stressful and bring up difficult emotions. Yet there are also fascinating and rewarding parts of the process when we see connections to older work, or are reminded of art friends, mentors, and experiences as we sort through our stuff. You may feel deep gratitude for your life as an artist when you realize the depth and breadth of your work and life as an artist. Anyone who is on the other side of major downsizing tends to be pleased and relieved. The process gives you a fresh start and provides a sense of feeling more organized and purposeful. Instead of a jumble of bits of your past, with perhaps only minimal organization, in your new space you will know precisely what you own, where it is, and overall, you will have a good sense of what everything you’ve kept means to you. It's easy to lose sight of these positive aspects of moving while you are in the middle of this often-exhausting process, but they do await you. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). • When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. ​ www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick ​ What's new at Cold Wax Academy? As Rebecca and Jerry enter the fourth year of live programming, they are bringing a special emphasis to reviewing and consolidating prior learning, as well as to increased member involvement on a variety of topics like professional development, mentoring issues, and other questions posed to the group. As always, Members are also encouraged to take part in the online sessions, where lively discussions take place as Rebecca and Jerry respond in real time, And don't forget that Cold Wax Academy Members have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions covering a broad range of topics. You don't have to use cold wax medium to benefit from the content in these recordings. Artists who use other painting media will also find a wealth of valuable information there, from the effective use of the visual elements and composition, to personal voice and intentions, to personal issues like procrastination and work/life balance--and...

Duration:00:32:14

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Episode 260: Downsizing For Artists

7/23/2023
The contents of an artist’s studio tend to be anything but minimal. Most of us accumulate a lot of art supplies not only for our current needs but for other projects that we have in in mind, or just because we love the possibilities suggested by a new material or tool. Then there is our inventory of older work, sometimes going back decades, as well as lots of miscellaneous items that tend to land in a creative space. Shelves, drawers, and closets become crammed as all this stuff builds up. Whether you are planning a move or just want to clear out some space, downsizing is a major project. Downsizing a studio requires a great deal of energy and many decisions, and it may be your total focus for weeks or even months depending on the scale of what you’re doing. While the basic logistics of clearing out a studio aren’t very different from similar work in a garage or basement, personal attachment to what you need to get rid of is stronger when it comes to your artwork and other things in your studio space. Much of what you must deal with is intimately tied to your creative self and part of your personal history as an artist. Dealing with artwork is probably the biggest challenge you will face when you are clearing out a studio. There are some good ways to sell some of this work, including holding a studio sale or online sale, especially if you put some thought and planning into the logistics of this. Other pieces may be given away or donated to a local art center, hospital, or charity organization. Putting old work or other items from your studio in the common area of a building that houses artist studios with a "free" sign is another solution. Art supplies, art books, studio furniture, teaching supplies, and miscellaneous things you've collected for inspiration can all be problematic as you sort and decide their destinations. But there will be many items that you realize you no longer need or want. Art studios tend to accumulate decades of your various projects and ideas, many of which you will have moved past. Downsizing or clearing out living space has been a topic for several years in the general media but as artists we have special challenges due to the highly personal aspects of what we are dealing with, and the fact that in terms of the value of things, the usual categories of what can be given away, sold, or tossed, are less clear. It is a challenging project, but the rewards of finally finishing the clearing process are great. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new at Cold Wax Academy? As Rebecca and Jerry reach the end of their third year of Live sessions they are launching a new phase of programming aimed at reviewing and reinforcing foundation topics--beginning with Color in their Summer quarter that starts on July 5th. This summer's sessions will also mentoring and professional development topics, as well as a painting clinic and a member critique. As always, Members of Cold Wax Academy have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions. And a table of contents to easily find specific topics in the recordings will soon be available. For more info and to join CWA please visit www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with...

Duration:00:33:24

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Episode 259: Surviving Your Opening

7/17/2023
Art openings are fun, right? Your friends and family are there to celebrate, your work is beautifully displayed, you meet new people who are interested in what you do, and you may see some red dots appear. So why do so many artists approach their opening receptions with mixed feelings or even dread? Even if you feel excited about the show and grateful for the opportunity to exhibit, you may feel nervous about being in the spotlight, confused about what’s expected of you, or disappointed by a small turnout. Even openings that live up to your highest expectations can feel overwhelming. Today we’ll take an inside look at how to survive and even enjoy your next art opening. Although there are challenges, openings can also encompass many positive moments. It's exciting to see your work in its best light when it has been in your studio for weeks or months, largely unseen. There is often an elevated quality to the work to see it in this setting, and it is affirming of all your efforts to have your work appreciated by a wide audience. Openings can be disconcerting though. It is easy to misread various aspects of what is happening around you, because there is often a party atmosphere rather than serious consideration of your work, and it may seem that no one cares to really look. There are also many unknown factors, for example, you often try to gauge what people think of your work or whether there will be any sales. And a commercial gallery has certain expectations that may be outside your comfort zone, like mingling and engaging with the people there. To make things easier for yourself, there are various ways to make yourself more comfortable, like choosing the right outfit and having a camera handy to have something to do as you move around the gallery space. But of all the many tasks and business responsibilities artists need to handle, for many of us, our own openings are the among most challenging times. it depends a lot on personality whether you dread openings or take them in stride, but experience is also helpful. Openings do become routine over time, and you find your own ways to make them bearable and even fun. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new at Cold Wax Academy? As Rebecca and Jerry reach the end of their third year of Live sessions they are launching a new phase of programming aimed at reviewing and reinforcing foundation topics--beginning with Color in their Summer quarter that starts on July 5th. This summer's sessions will also mentoring and professional development topics, as well as a painting clinic and a member critique. As always, Members of Cold Wax Academy have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions. And a table of contents to easily find specific topics in the recordings will soon be available. For more info and to join CWA please visit www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all their knowledge and encouragement is a gift in my life unsurpassed." Also-- please visit https://www.espacioart.org to learn about Rebecca...

Duration:00:36:19

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Episode 258: Making Assumptions

7/11/2023
As artists we are often in uncertain territory when dealing with the world of galleries, exhibits, and other opportunities, and leaning on assumptions --what we believe you know about a situation --can help you feel more grounded or confident. But when you find out you’ve misread a situation, you may be left feeling angry or frustrated, or blame yourself for not seeing things more clearly. How can you maintain your objectivity and identify your assumptions as you navigate the ups and downs of an art career? There are no easy answers but today we will offer some perspective on this tricky issue. The definition of assumption is "something that is accepted or believed to be true, or as certain to happen, without proof." But proof is very hard to come by when dealing with unknown situations. Nobody can have proof of everything in their lives let alone in the variable and diverse art world. We all operate on plenty of assumptions in our attempts to further our art career. But some assumptions can come from being naive or uniformed about the situation. Many opportunities in the art world are totally legitimate but many are not. Some are basically scams in that you’re being led astray on purpose. This means you can waste a lot of your resources because you trusted that a venue was working in your best interests. But even with legitimate venues and opportunities, we can be led astray by unrealistic expectations and assumptions. You need to be aware of any assumptions about a situation that are blinding you to what is best for you. And communication is always key in understanding as clearly as you can how to navigate various situations, whether you're dealing with a gallery, arts organization, artist residency program, teaching opportunity, or any of the other myriad opportunities that may come your way. No matter where you are in an art career you probably grapple with the pitfalls of expectations and assumptions. Because there are lots of different scenarios you will encounter, it's hard to be on track in every situation. Give yourself a break when you recognize you’ve let assumptions play too big a role. Nobody makes the right calls all the time, but we do learn from experience in identifying our own assumptions. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new at Cold Wax Academy? As Rebecca and Jerry reach the end of their third year of Live sessions they are launching a new phase of programming aimed at reviewing and reinforcing foundation topics--beginning with Color in their Summer quarter that starts on July 5th. This summer's sessions will also mentoring and professional development topics, as well as a painting clinic and a member critique. As always, Members of Cold Wax Academy have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions. And a table of contents to easily find specific topics in the recordings will soon be available. For more info and to join CWA please visit www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all their knowledge and encouragement is a...

Duration:00:33:46

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Episode 257: More Than One Direction

7/1/2023
In the interest of having a consistent style, artists are generally advised to stick to one type of work --both in the studio and when exhibiting. But many artists are experimental, curious, and explore more than one direction—so this advice can seem too restrictive. In our last episode, we touched briefly on the idea that a range of the same artist’s work can be promoted effectively if done with consideration. If you have more than one direction you may have questions about how you can best present your work when exhibiting or in other situations, and today we will address those concerns. While it is advisable to have one primary focus that you fully develop and go deeply into, there are many good reasons that artists explore multiple directions as sidelines. Working in various media and approaches tends to inspire new ideas, energy, and insights, and helps keep your work fresh. Different approaches may also appeal to different audiences and thus expand your marketing possibilities. But it's important to think about how to present your work when you have more than one direction. Different situations involve different concerns, and you need to consider the audience for each. For example, when approaching a gallery or applying for a grant or commission, you will make the strongest impression if you present only your main body of work. In these cases, the person deciding about your work wants to see consistency and an immediate visual impression. Other situations, such as when you post on social media, hold an open studio, or do a slide talk about your work, it's fine to show the breadth of what you do. In these situations, your audience has more time to absorb your various directions. If you want to show a range of work on your website, it's best to clearly separate your various directions and provide some written insight into your reasons for pursuing them. In the best scenario, your work in various media or approaches will have an interesting relationship. Viewers seeing a range of your work will then be able to deepen their understanding of who you are as an artist. If your ideas come from a strong inner source rather than being very scattered, -they will be more worthwhile for you to pursue,and be more likely to enhance how others view your work. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new at Cold Wax Academy? As Rebecca and Jerry reach the end of their third year of Live sessions they are launching a new phase of programming aimed at reviewing and reinforcing foundation topics--beginning with Color in their Summer quarter that starts on July 5th. This summer's sessions will also mentoring and professional development topics, as well as a painting clinic and a member critique. As always, Members of Cold Wax Academy have unlimited streaming access to over 100 previously recorded sessions. And a table of contents to easily find specific topics in the recordings will soon be available. For more info and to join CWA please visit www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all...

Duration:00:38:24

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Episode 256: When Art Travel Ends

6/24/2023
We’ve talked several times in the past about the experience of attending an artist residency program when you are away from your home studio, focused exclusively on your work in a stimulating environment. We’ve also talked about the importance of travel in general for feeding your creative ideas. But what about when that residency or the travel is over? Will the bubble you have been in for weeks, focused on your work or satisfying your travel curiosity, simply burst? Today we talk about that transitional time back to ordinary life and how that plays out in your work. When you spend time at a residency or doing art-related travel, coming back to your studio can present challenges. Your vision has been altered, and your experiences while away will affect your thoughts and feelings. You may have done work that is quite different in terms of media, scale, or source ideas that what you normally do. You have also probably been free of marketing or business concerns, and perhaps not considering where the work would end up in terms of display or sales. It's good to take some time once home to contemplate the similarities and differences with your previous or ongoing work. Will the work you did while away simply exist as your response to your time away, a separate project, perhaps a sort of travel journal? Or will it contribute to or integrate with the main body of your work? Will you continue to pursue the ideas you explored while away, or is that work specific to the place where you were? It will probably take some time to process the various ideas that your travel has evoked. Part of that may be inviting others to see the work from your time away. Thier comments can provide more insight and they may see connections to your ongoing work that you have overlooked. While as artists we are always taking in new ideas when we travel, doing so with an art focus or as an artist in residence is very different from travel as a tourist. When you are able to create during your trip, you can process your impressions in an immediate way. This can enforce your experiences in ways that will have a permanent effect on your work overall, whether obvious or subtle. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new At Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry launched their spring quarter on April 12th. Sessions this quarter so far included identifying compositional issues in your work, and technical information from Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin. Upcoming sessions include a painting clinic for works in progress, and much more. As always, members can join in on live sessions with questions and comments, and can benefit anytime by interacting with other members on our Members-only facebook page. With 100 recorded sessions in the member library there is always something to learn or review, with topics ranging from technical advice to visual language to guests speakers and critiques of member work. To learn more about membership, and to purchase cold wax tools and Rebecca and Jerry's book, Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic...

Duration:00:33:24

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Episode 255: Silence, Solitude, and the Creative Pause

6/10/2023
Many creative people embrace quiet, solitary moments as portals to being in synch with their work. Stepping away from everyday distractions is a way of nurturing your creative self, bringing you more in touch with your emotions, ideas, and the bigger picture of what you want to express. Yet true silence and solitude tend to be rare in our lives, unless we make a conscious effort to bring them in. Most people are aware of the value of meditation and other spiritual practices like prayer as a way of calming and centering and consider it important, usually as a way of starting the day. But once you move into the main flow of a busy day, most of us never pause to find a quiet moment of solitude. A purposeful, brief stepping back from full engagement with your work, a pause in which you take a moment to refresh your vision and can enhance your creative process by allowing you to get find your center and purpose again. It's good to take this kind of pause not out of frustration or exhaustion, but during a good flow of activity. If you stay in the moment but simply pause for a moment to look out the window, take a drink of water, or step outside, you are not likely to lose your flow. Working this type of pause into the rhythm of your process can seem counterintuitive, but one way to create this habit is to simply extend a natural pause-- taking a drink a water or washing your hands--and another minute or so to find something else to gaze at. Solitude and silence are other ways to enhance creativity by bringing your attention inward, whether in the studio or elsewhere in life. Anything that helps you be in touch with your inner thoughts and feelings can be helpful. Consciously making space for solitude and silence in your life can be an important step to going deeper into your work Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new At Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry launched their spring quarter on April 12th. Sessions this quarter so far included identifying compositional issues in your work, and technical information from Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin. Upcoming sessions include a painting clinic for works in progress, and much more. As always, members can join in on live sessions with questions and comments, and can benefit anytime by interacting with other members on our Members-only facebook page. With 100 recorded sessions in the member library there is always something to learn or review, with topics ranging from technical advice to visual language to guests speakers and critiques of member work. To learn more about membership, and to purchase cold wax tools and Rebecca and Jerry's book, Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all their knowledge and encouragement is a gift in my life unsurpassed." Also-- please visit https://www.espacioart.org to learn about Rebecca and Jerry's newest project, Espacio, dedicated to providing beautiful living and working spaces for artists and writers. Espacio's...

Duration:00:35:14

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Episode 254: Intuitive, Spontaneous, or Random?

6/5/2023
Intuition and spontaneity are important to many artists. But what about randomness? While these words are related in superficial ways, they have very different meanings in the context of art practice. Intuition and spontaneity play positive roles. Intuition can be a powerful guide and a source of new ideas, and spontaneity leads to energy and excitement. Randomness, on the other hand, tends to lead you off track and reduce the meaning and impact of your work. Intuition and spontaneity have somewhat different meanings although they are very closely related. Intuition means inner knowing or understanding, a sense of rightness. It may evolve slowly and grow over time based on practice and experience and can stand up to analysis and questioning. Spontaneity means being in the present moment, playing, and acting with freedom and energy. It is reactive to the situation and not something to question or analyze. How do these approaches differ from randomness? Although all three are alike in not being planned, random responses are characterized as being without purpose and based in chance. They have no specific source, while intuition and spontaneity both arise from your core creative self and push you forward in inspiring ways. It can be very helpful to recognize your own use of these three approaches. Learning to recognize randomness and avoiding it can help keep you on track with developing meaning in your work, while cultivating intuition and spontaneity can provide valuable insight and energy. These distinctions can be hard to identify in the moment but in observing your work over time you can more easily see their impact. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new At Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry launched their spring quarter on April 12th. Sessions this quarter so far included identifying compositional issues in your work, and technical information from Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin. Upcoming sessions include a painting clinic for works in progress, and much more. As always, members can join in on live sessions with questions and comments, and can benefit anytime by interacting with other members on our Members-only facebook page. With 100 recorded sessions in the member library there is always something to learn or review, with topics ranging from technical advice to visual language to guests speakers and critiques of member work. To learn more about membership, and to purchase cold wax tools and Rebecca and Jerry's book, Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all their knowledge and encouragement is a gift in my life unsurpassed." Also-- please visit https://www.espacioart.org to learn about Rebecca and Jerry's newest project, Espacio, dedicated to providing beautiful living and working spaces for artists and writers. Espacio's first offering is Casa Clavel, a modern, fully equipped house opening this September in the beautiful cultural city of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. A few...

Duration:00:32:15

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Episode 253: Dealing with Rejection

5/27/2023
It’s never easy putting your work in front of others to be judged and scrutinized, but if you don’t it’s very hard to gain a wider audience or grow as an artist. Submitting work to galleries, grant panels, juried shows, and competitions tends to become a routine part of what artists do. But for every time you’re chosen for an opportunity, there are many more times when you are rejected or simply ignored. And despite the thick skins many of us develop, rejection is never easy. Today we’ll talk about coping with rejection and try to gain some perspective on its inevitability Accepting rejection as part of the process of your development is important. We all try many things as artists that don't work out for us, whether that is a new medium, a project, or a technique. Yet we learn to carry on with the next idea with a positive attitude. Rather than taking rejection as a personal affront, it's helpful to look at it in a similar objective way, as just another attempt that didn't turn out as you hoped. But although it is basically good advice to shrug off rejection this is also a simplistic approach, because most people have emotional or personality characteristics that get in the way. These include perfectionism, insecurity, inflexibility, a sense of entitlement or being prone to having unrealistic expectations. It helps to try and separate your own personal issues from the reality of how the art world operates. Although there are certainly times when an artist's work is rejected based on a lack of quality or originality, many times this decision has more to do with the goals of the gallery, juried show, venue, or residency program which may or may not be apparent. How you experience rejection tends to change over a long art career. In the beginning, you probably apply for more opportunities, and hence receive more rejections. When you are more established you are probably more selective about where you submit. After all, your needs change, and every application requires focus, time, and sometimes cost. In deciding where to place your resources, consider your true goals and how an acceptance would contribute to your growth as an artist. It is never wise to apply out of a sense of competition or regard an acceptance as a "win" or to prove yourself. With this attitude, it is easy to see rejection as invalidating your work and can undermine your confidence. There is a danger in letting rejection affect you too much, in becoming discouraged, or allowing it to affect your self-image as an artist. Knowing how common it is for artists at every stage to be rejected may help, as does insight into the way art venues operate and to understand that your work may simply not align with whoever is deciding the outcome wants. In the end, it's up to you to push forward according to your own goals, despite rejections. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new At Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry launched their spring quarter on April 12th. Sessions this quarter so far included identifying compositional issues in your work, and technical information from Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin. Upcoming sessions include a painting clinic for works in progress, and much more. As always, members can join in on live sessions with questions and comments, and can benefit anytime by interacting with other members on our Members-only facebook page. With 100...

Duration:00:36:03

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Episode 252: Personal or Formal?

5/15/2023
We tend to think of artistic expression as being very personal, as coming from the artist’s experiences, emotions, memories, and responses. But there are also many works of art that are not focused on personal expression. Instead, the artist is motivated to explore a more impersonal realm of ideas, patterns, and more universal concepts. For most artists, there is a balance between sources that are more and less personal, a balance in working between the heart and the mind. That individual balance is basic to the artist’s voice and unique expression. Today we’re going to talk about these two different approaches to making art and the balance in your own art practice. In looking at art history in these terms it is easy to see the differences, and to recognize the ways that artists have drawn from both personal and formal sources. These divisions, although they tend to overlap in any one artist's work, are useful in understanding your own preferences and tendencies, and what is important to you. Do you prefer a more intellectual, structured approach--one that is removed from pure emotion? Or is expressing your personal experiences in a freer way important to you? These divisions are simplistic, however. Even the most formal work may have emotion behind it, and the most informal relies on formal concerns like composition and the use of the visual elements. Both approaches are equally valid, from pure abstraction to the most expressive ways of working. But in getting started, formal concerns like developing technique, and understanding the visual elements are an excellent starting point for finding your personal voice. Personal expression tends to emerge from this kind of exploration, but without a firm formal grounding it is difficult to develop powerful work. It's important to develop your appreciation for the approach that feels less natural to you, and to recognize that any weakness in your own work may have its roots in that other approach. If your work is strictly formal, could it benefit from letting a little more of your more personal experience and sources come through? If strictly informal, is there enough structure to allow the viewer a way in, or a universality that allows their engagement with the image? Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new At Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry launched their spring quarter on April 12th. Sessions this quarter so far included identifying compositional issues in your work, and technical information from Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin. Upcoming sessions include a painting clinic for works in progress, and much more. As always, members can join in on live sessions with questions and comments, and can benefit anytime by interacting with other members on our Members-only facebook page. With 100 recorded sessions in the member library there is always something to learn or review, with topics ranging from technical advice to visual language to guests speakers and critiques of member work. To learn more about membership, and to purchase cold wax tools and Rebecca and Jerry's book, Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax...

Duration:00:31:43

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Episode 251: Travel Tips for Artists

5/8/2023
The ideas and energy gained from travel are important to many artists, and when you travel, you seldom leave your art self behind. The stimulation of travel and new experiences tends to create strong impressions and bring on the urge to create while you’re away from home, no matter the overall reason for your trip. This means bringing along at least some art supplies, and lots more if the focus of your trip is a residency or workshop. It's hard to know ahead of time what environments or situations you will encounter, and what you will want to respond to. So, this makes planning your materials a challenge. But you can make some general decisions about the type of materials you want to bring, and how much time and space you will have for your work. Are you traveling as a tourist, or is your travel more focused on your work? If it's a shorter, busier, tourist type of trip, it may be that simply collecting ideas, photos, and quick work to reference later will satisfy your creative needs. But there are many other situations when you may have a studio of sorts,--at a residency workshop, or self-catered set up, and you are planning a longer stay in which you focus on your work. If you will be delving deeply into your work while away, and you are using public transport to get there, do the best you can to anticipate your needs as you pack,and consider the option for buying supplies at your destination. But an attitude of accepting your choices of matrials once they are made and doing what you can with what you bring can be a creative portal. Responding in the moment to what moves you is the most important consideration. Packing, shipping, weight restrictions, toxicity, and other factors are all factors, but often the simplest solutions are sufficient and may present exciting challenges. If you typically work with oil, why not bring only a small selection of inks, watercolors, and other water-based media, along with some drawing media? Our listeners contributed many experiences and tips for this episode about materials and packing, so please have a listen to hear what they had to say. This is the website mentioned in the podcast for travel materials related to watercolor and drawing media: https://arttoolkit.com Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new At Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry launched their spring quarter on April 12th. Sessions this quarter so far included identifying compositional issues in your work, and technical information from Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin. Upcoming sessions include a painting clinic for works in progress, and much more. As always, members can join in on live sessions with questions and comments, and can benefit anytime by interacting with other members on our Members-only facebook page. With 100 recorded sessions in the member library there is always something to learn or review, with topics ranging from technical advice to visual language to guests speakers and critiques of member work. To learn more about membership, and to purchase cold wax tools and Rebecca and Jerry's book, Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy:...

Duration:00:35:48

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Episode 250: Expressions of Gratitude

4/29/2023
As artists, what role can gratitude play in our work and practice? On a personal level, we know that focusing on what we’re grateful for is good for overall mental health and contentment. Today we’d like to talk about specific situations in which appreciation and gratitude can help artists cope with some of the tougher aspects of art practice. Expressing gratitude can also help in your professional life to build mutual appreciation and respect in your dealings with the art world. Today we’ll talk about the importance of gratitude on both personal and professional levels. Thinking about gratitude in ways that are specific to your art life and work ienhances a positive state of mind. To look back over your life, and make a list of who has helped you, who has understood your passion, and what opportunities that have come your way is a powerful tool in maintaining a positive outlook. Becoming aware of these sources of support can help you through times of frustration or feeling a lack of appreciation, understanding the goodness that in the big picture of our lives. Any success you've achieved has not happened without support and encouragement from other people. Acknowledging this support on both a personal and professional level is healthy for everyone involved. One way of expressing gratitude is simply to be generous--to transform what has been given to you into new forms, whether that is through teaching, supporting your art friends in their struggles, purchasing artwork from others, or simply a direct conversation with someone you appreciate. It is good also to be grateful for the basic importance of art in your life, the fact that you have the ability to express what moves you in ways that can be shared with other people. In this way, every work of art is an expression of gratitude. Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=Yyrf7Ht1DYfkYzAaWNoW8zuvCpTryLYsxY2VAj4qGZ3o2o4F7xHGv4VmDDef7kFxuvbgpz_z4jUa-z7F). ​ When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies. www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick What's new At Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry launched their spring quarter on April 12th. Sessions this quarter so far included identifying compositional issues in your work, and technical information from Gamblin representative Mary Tevlin. Upcoming sessions include a painting clinic for works in progress, and much more. As always, members can join in on live sessions with questions and comments, and can benefit anytime by interacting with other members on our Members-only facebook page. With 100 recorded sessions in the member library there is always something to learn or review, with topics ranging from technical advice to visual language to guests speakers and critiques of member work. To learn more about membership, and to purchase cold wax tools and Rebecca and Jerry's book, Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com Please visit http://www.coldwaxacademy.com for more information as well as basic information about using cold wax medium. Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience with Cold Wax Academy: "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all their knowledge and encouragement is a gift in my life unsurpassed." Also-- please visit https://www.espacioart.org to learn about Rebecca and Jerry's newest project, Espacio, dedicated to providing beautiful living and working spaces for artists and writers....

Duration:00:30:15