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Each week on With Good Reason, our ever-curious host Sarah McConnell takes you along as she examines a wide range of topics with leading scholars.

Each week on With Good Reason, our ever-curious host Sarah McConnell takes you along as she examines a wide range of topics with leading scholars.
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Location:

Charlottesville, VA

Description:

Each week on With Good Reason, our ever-curious host Sarah McConnell takes you along as she examines a wide range of topics with leading scholars.

Language:

English

Contact:

145 Ednam Drive, Charlottesville, VA 1 877 451 5098


Episodes

Meet Your Maker

11/16/2018
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During the holiday season, it feels like more and more consumers are skipping the department stores and opting for handcrafted goods instead. Ben Brewer says this current “third wave” craft renaissance we’re experiencing is tied to politics. We visit mOb, an innovative design studio at Virginia Commonwealth University, where students help solve design problems in the city of Richmond. We stop in at the Virginia Center for the Book, where Kristin Keimu Adolfson is printing a collaborative...

Duration:00:51:58

Brand Survival in the Trump Era

11/7/2018
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In this political climate, do brands suffer or thrive when companies take sides? Also, self expression through purchasing power has gone through the roof for African Americans.

Duration:00:51:58

Making the Decision to Fight

11/1/2018
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We open the show with part two of the new podcast, American Dissent--featuring a woman who chose to fight the Trump administration decision to rescind DACA, and the story of the high school students whose protest helped lead to school desegregation. Also, journalists and authors discuss the opioids crisis and the effects of economic decline on rural communities—and the vital role of local journalism to an informed citizenry.

Duration:00:51:57

Infrastructures of Power

10/26/2018
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Across the nation, natural gas production has been ramping up. In many communities, this has meant new pipelines, new promises, and new protests. How do we balance environmental concerns and the public good? Environmental engineer Andres Clarens (University of Virginia)explains the science. Jaime Allison (Christopher Newport University) argues that we can better understand pipelines by looking back to the early days of railroads. Economist Sarah Stafford (College of William and Mary) argues...

Duration:00:51:57

Front Porches of the Dead

10/19/2018
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Welcome flags, monogrammed door mats, bird feeders, and whirligigs. These are all things you might find on a front porch—or on a gravesite. We're more creative now in our cemeteries. Plus, millions of Americans have had near death experiences and there are startling consistencies in the accounts.

Duration:00:51:54

The Face of Fake News

10/12/2018
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Love it or hate it (more likely a bit of both) Facebook is worth careful scholarly study--particularly in the field of politics. We hear from political scientists who argue that the sins of Facebook are built into the platform itself and congress needs to break up Facebook using antitrust laws.

Duration:00:52:00

Voices of Vietnam: Women of War

10/4/2018
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More than 30,000 American women served in some form in Vietnam during the war. From the Red Cross volunteers who boosted morale to the nurses who treated injuries, women were a major part of soldiers’ experience of the war. The war also upended the lives of millions of wives, widows and girlfriends back home.

Duration:00:51:59

The Year of the Woman

9/27/2018
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Women have been making headlines all over the country, running for office--and winning. We hear from some of those women about what it was like during their first week on the job. And scholars reflect on what it takes to get more women on the ballot.

Duration:00:51:59

Moonshine and Prohibition

9/21/2018
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Moonshiners are often portrayed as lawbreakers and profiteers. But these recorded interviews with former moonshiners and their children paint a portrait of close knit poor families in Appalachia helping each other keep food on the table.

Duration:00:51:54

The Right to Dissent

9/13/2018
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This week we’re debuting a new podcast series called American Dissent, hosted by Kelley Libby. In Episode 1: Influenced by Colin Kaepernick’s protest of police brutality during the National Anthem, a high school volleyball player initiates her own protest, and not without consequences. And a historian tells the story of a religious minority who helped win the American Revolution and the fight for religious freedom in America. American Dissent is a production of James Madison’s Montpelier and...

Duration:00:51:58

The Substance of Addiction

9/7/2018
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Do we fret too much that we're glued to our cell phones? Trevor Hoag says we should stop using the language of addiction liked ‘hooked on our iPhones” and embrace the positives. Plus, experts weigh in on the need to customize addiction treatments.

Duration:00:51:59

Social Mobility Through College

8/31/2018
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One of the great American beliefs is that a college education gives us a better shot at moving up in life. But some say that social mobility has stalled and we should expand access to those universities admitting the largest numbers of low income students.

Duration:00:51:50

Free the Beaches

8/23/2018
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In "Free the Beaches" Andrew Kahrl tells the story of activist Ned Coll and his campaign to open New England’s shoreline to African Americans, as northern white families fought to preserve their segregated beaches.

Duration:00:51:55

Do Cells Phones Cause Cancer?

8/17/2018
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D you ever worry that the radiation coming from your cell phone might be harmful? Researching Deborah O’Dell recently finished a 5-year study that found cell phone radiation can cause changes to our brain cells.

Duration:00:51:58

Pilgrimage

8/10/2018
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100 pilgrims journey from Charlottesville to the national memorial to lynching in Montgomery, Alabama to pay homage to a black man who was lynched in 1898.

Duration:00:51:57

An Outrage

8/3/2018
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Beginning with the end of the Civil War, and well into the middle of the twentieth century, the extralegal and socially sanctioned practice of lynching claimed the lives of at least 3,959 African American men, women, and children. Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren are the directors of a recent documentary about lynching and its effects on families. The film is called An Outrage.

Duration:00:52:02

Music That Mends

7/27/2018
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Can art heal? This week, the redemptive power of language and song. Hear how former inmates use writing to explore their paths to imprisonment and how jazz can tell stories of social justice, healing, self-reflection and redemption.

Duration:00:51:59

Vietnam: Fighting on Two Fronts

7/19/2018
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African Americans who fought for their country in Vietnam often experienced the racism their families endured back home. Plus: Native Americans fought in Vietnam in greater numbers relative to their population than any other group. We hear testimony of Native Americans who fought for the U.S. on foreign soil.

Duration:00:51:28

Summer Reading Recs

7/12/2018
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Summer reads from the With Good Reason universe! Inman Majors gives us some comedic escapism, Erin Jones is reading about mid-century women artists reclaiming the pin-up, and Sharon Jones shares why she, a black woman with a comfortable salary, is spending her summer reading about whiteness and poverty.

Duration:00:51:57

The Ghost in the MP3

7/5/2018
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The 1987 pop song “Tom’s Diner” by Suzanne Vega is considered the “mother of the MP3.” It was the test track used by German scientists to perfect this new file format that would revolutionize the music industry. Ryan Maguire has been experimenting with the sounds that got stripped out of that first MP3.

Duration:00:51:58