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Marketplace

American Public Media

Every weekday, host Kai Ryssdal helps you make sense of the day’s business and economic news — no econ degree or finance background required. “Marketplace” takes you beyond the numbers, bringing you context. Our team of reporters all over the world speak with CEOs, policymakers and regular people just trying to get by.

Location:

Los Angeles, CA

Description:

Every weekday, host Kai Ryssdal helps you make sense of the day’s business and economic news — no econ degree or finance background required. “Marketplace” takes you beyond the numbers, bringing you context. Our team of reporters all over the world speak with CEOs, policymakers and regular people just trying to get by.

Language:

English

Contact:

261 South Figueroa Street #200 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 621-3500


Episodes
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The blue screen of death

7/19/2024
Nearly every economic sector relies on secure technology networks: retailers, airlines, hospitals and more. After a faulty software update by cybersecurity giant CrowdStrike, businesses across the globe came screeching to a halt, dragging customers with them. In this episode, the tech firm behind today’s maddening “blue screen of death.” Plus: why the Federal Reserve plans communication blackouts, a former delivery driver remembers using chickens to mark her routes, and industry upheaval threatens an Alaskan fishing community.

Duration:00:27:23

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What do rising unemployment claims mean for the economy?

7/18/2024
The number of people filing for jobless benefits in each of the last two weeks rose. That means it’s taking job seekers longer to find employment. It’s also offers mild support to those who want to see lower interest rates. Also: Who’s spending and who isn’t? And what AI means for authors and publishers.

Duration:00:25:04

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It’s homebuying season

7/17/2024
Now’s the time of year when many families look for a new home. But it’s a seemingly impossible market for first-time buyers: high prices, high mortgage rates, high insurance, low inventory. We’ll explain how some are pulling it off and why some experts believe lower home prices and rents are in sight. Also: State and local governments have been on a hiring spree, and business inventories are up.

Duration:00:25:50

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Consumers are still consuming

7/16/2024
Retail sales numbers released today show spending was flat last month. But if you look a little deeper, you’ll see Americans spent more in June than May. What does this mean for the Federal Reserve as it considers lowering interest rates? Also: Homebuilders are feeling a little less confident, and AI is trying to read emotions. Plus, the nocturnal sprint at UPS’ one-day-shipping hub.

Duration:00:26:21

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That lurking recession never showed up

7/15/2024
The economy seems to be coming in for a soft landing, and that’s a big reason banks are doing so well. Markets are up, emboldening companies to make merger deals, which they pay investment banks to execute. JPMorgan Chase just posted the highest quarterly net income for a bank in U.S. history — $18.1 billion. Also: On the eve of Amazon Prime Day, how a shipping hub handles quick turnarounds. Plus, another decline in China’s GDP, and a DJ looks back at her analog life spinning vinyl.

Duration:00:25:40

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America’s got a power grid problem

7/12/2024
Nearly a million Texans are without power after Hurricane Beryl damaged an already fragile energy grid. As they wait for the lights come back on, we’ll explain why pretty much the whole country needs costly energy grid updates, especially as climate change makes weather more extreme. Also in this episode: Students who attended for-profit colleges are drowning in debt, and legal experts break down what might happen to federal regulatory agencies without the Chevron deference.

Duration:00:26:15

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Is the Fed getting closer?

7/11/2024
Inflation cooled for the third straight month in June, and borrowers hope rate cuts come soon. But will enough “good data” show up to ease the risks of a flare-up in prices? We break down the Fed’s decision-making process — and explain why shelter prices are one thing holding the central bank back. Also in this episode: Workers at the Port of Baltimore are full steam ahead as the region recovers from the Key Bridge collapse, and a SCOTUS decision opens the door to changes in tribal nation health care management.

Duration:00:26:50

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How fast would the economy feel an interest rate cut?

7/10/2024
Inquiring minds want to know: When will the Federal Reserve cut interest rates? Fed Chair Jay Powell isn’t ready to answer that question. But when rates are cut, there’s gonna be a lag before the Americans feels it. Also in this episode: Egg-freezing rates skyrocket as more employer benefits cover the procedure, the U.S. is less trade-oriented than other countries, and nearly half of Gen Xers aren’t financially on track to retire, a new study says.

Duration:00:26:46

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Health care is still hot in the job market

7/9/2024
The job market has cooled in recent months. The days of two openings per available worker may be over, but some sectors still have to struggle to find employees. One industry on a hot streak is health care, thanks in part to the continued workforce disruptions caused by COVID. Also in this episode: Small-business optimism rises despite cost concerns, tweens concoct potentially harmful “skin care smoothies” and steel prices sag as demand drops.

Duration:00:27:24

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How to succeed in streaming

7/8/2024
Paramount just announced a merger with Skydance, a film production company. The hope is that adding Skydance’s offerings to its streaming platforms will boost subscriptions. But streaming is a finicky business, where you have to be a top-tier service to thrive. Also in this episode: Dynamic pricing technology could be profitable for retailers, some Chinese families seek gentler school environments and Americans visit South Korea as skin care tourists.

Duration:00:28:21

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How many Native people live in the U.S.? Good question.

7/5/2024
Federal surveys aren’t great at collecting data on Native Americans. One reason? As many as 60% of people who check the American Indian/Alaska Native box on forms also check another race box, the Brookings Institution found. In this episode, we’ll explain how undercounting impacts the federal government’s fulfillment of its obligations to Native nations. Plus, we’ll take a trip down the Houston Ship Channel and dissect the latest jobs report.

Duration:00:27:21

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The wages vs. inflation horse race

7/4/2024
The May jobs report said wages had risen about 4% over 12 months, while inflation was 3.3% over the same period. Good news, right? Then why did consumer sentiment hit a 7-month low in June? In this episode, other wages-related measurements that might explain that economic pessimism. Plus, a Yale legislation-scoring group focuses on outcomes, and precision agriculture technology adoption is slow.

Duration:00:26:47

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The Federal Reserve’s fork in the road

7/3/2024
The Federal Reserve has a decision to make: cut interest rates to help the slackening job market and risk the progress it’s made in cooling inflation, or keep rates high — which could push unemployment up. In this episode, we’ll explain the economic inflection point and why interest rates don’t have the relationship to the labor market they once had. Plus, the presidential debate bumped up bond yields, the “beer industry” encompasses all types of drinks and customers nowadays, and one woman recalls her first 9-to-5.

Duration:00:28:11

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That snooze-fest jobs report is probably a good thing

7/2/2024
Tuesday’s jobs report showed 200,000 more openings in May than the previous month — pretty yawn-worthy compared to the labor market roller coaster of the past few years. But don’t fret! All that boring data is actually a sign of stability. Also in this episode: Why organic produce is expensive to grow, what it’s going to take for global power sector emissions to fall, and which type of construction is dragging sector spending down.

Duration:00:26:01

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A rigged version of Monopoly

7/1/2024
Lawrence Brown created “Urban Cipher,” a Monopoly-like game, to illustrate the consequences of neighborhood redlining. We’ll join Baltimore city educators at a professional development session led by Brown and hear how redlining continues to affect families today. Also in this episode: Lumber prices fall while housing remains expensive, Toys R Us dips its toe into AI-generated advertising and a landscape designer tells us about his job before the arrival of drafting software.

Duration:00:28:05

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Homelessness criminalized as home sales fall and prices rise

6/28/2024
Today we learned that the conservative majority on the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a local law in Oregon that criminalizes sleeping in public places, authorizing punishment for homelessness. We’ll get into how this connects to the stalled housing market. Plus, SCOTUS curtails the powers of government agencies and national work-from-home rates reach a new normal.

Duration:00:27:21

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SCOTUS curbs regulatory agencies’ powers. Again.

6/27/2024
The Supreme Court has decided a case involving internal tribunals the SEC uses to enforce fraud rules. In this episode, we’ll hear from a legal scholar about the ruling’s implications for all sorts of federal regulatory bodies. The short of it? It will be harder for agencies to enforce laws and easier for people and companies to get away with breaking them. Plus: what “final sales” means in the Federal Reserve’s analysis of GDP and why continuing jobless claims are climbing.

Duration:00:28:21

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How about those new tariffs?

6/26/2024
Over the past few months, the Biden administration has announced new tariffs — on top of existing Trump-era ones. The period for public comment on them is nearly over, so we’ll hear business owners’ views on the levies’ likely impact on sales. Also in this episode: An all-female fire crew burns barriers, Google phases out infinite scroll and the U.S. semiconductor industry sorta relies on a hard-to-win visa lottery.

Duration:00:27:48

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Why so miserable?

6/25/2024
Data shows that the U.S. has a strong, thriving economy. Layoffs are at a multidecade low and wages have risen faster than prices. Despite all that and more, many Americans are feeling economic pain. What gives? Also in this episode, third-generation tuna fishermen rethink their livelihood as waters warm. We’ll also explain why most countries buy oil in U.S. dollars and whether the federal minimum wage matters anymore.

Duration:00:28:04

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Breaking Ground: Red Lake Nation’s solar-powered future

6/24/2024
Red Lake Nation’s chairman, Darrell G. Seki Sr., wants to make energy free for all his nation’s citizens. Inflation Reduction Act funding could enable that by subsidizing the installation of more solar panels throughout their northern Minnesota reservation. In this episode, “Marketplace” host Kai Ryssdal visits Red Lake and hears from residents about their solar-powered goals and how clean energy connects to cultural values around environmental stewardship.

Duration:00:30:07