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PBS NewsHour - Making Sen$e

PBS

Every week, we cover the world of economics like no other podcast. From an inside look at the massive market for collector sneakers to the corporate costs for businesses that dabble in Trump era politics, Making Sense will make you think about economics in a whole new way. Episodes are published every Thursday by 9 pm. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full shows, individual segments, Shields and Brooks, Brief but Spectacular, Politics Monday and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Every week, we cover the world of economics like no other podcast. From an inside look at the massive market for collector sneakers to the corporate costs for businesses that dabble in Trump era politics, Making Sense will make you think about economics in a whole new way. Episodes are published every Thursday by 9 pm. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full shows, individual segments, Shields and Brooks, Brief but Spectacular, Politics Monday and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.
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Location:

United States

Networks:

PBS

Description:

Every week, we cover the world of economics like no other podcast. From an inside look at the massive market for collector sneakers to the corporate costs for businesses that dabble in Trump era politics, Making Sense will make you think about economics in a whole new way. Episodes are published every Thursday by 9 pm. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full shows, individual segments, Shields and Brooks, Brief but Spectacular, Politics Monday and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Language:

English


Episodes

Can a high school dropout turned top economist give a new perspective to the Fed?

12/13/2018
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Mary Daly dropped out of high school and ended up as president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. As a part of our weekly series Making Sense, Paul Solman travels with Daly to Boise, Idaho, where through a unique lens of economic policy, she tries to help others find the same success in the workforce as she did.

Duration:00:08:47

Could driverless vehicles spell the end of the road for truck drivers?

12/6/2018
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The trucking industry has long faced a driver shortage, in part because of high risk, low pay and long hours. The rise of autonomous vehicles could alleviate that problem--but it could also eliminate jobs for a population of older men who lack college degrees and might have difficulty finding new work. Paul Solman explores the conundrum for our special Future of Work series.

Duration:00:08:37

Automation threatens jobs. Can education create new ones?

12/4/2018
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As automation spreads through the American economy, experts say its impacts will be uneven. Key factors in determining that effect include geography and race, but likely even more important is education. With the rapid pace of technological evolution, will job training be able to keep pace? John Yang reports from the Inland Empire of California as part of our new series, the Future of Work.

Duration:00:08:09

In rural Appalachia, can health care become the new coal?

12/3/2018
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Pikeville is a small city of 6,700 nestled in the mountains of eastern Kentucky--a rural area that has struggled to survive the decline of the coal industry. Now, local residents are pinning their futures on health care, which is desperately needed for a population whose life expectancy lags years behind the national average. Amna Nawaz reports for our new series, the Future of Work.

Duration:00:08:04

How technological innovation could amplify income inequality

11/29/2018
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Technological advancement often brings the promise of increased efficiency in the workplace. But it also means apprehension about humans potentially being replaced by automation and artificial intelligence. In a new series, "The Future of Work," Paul Solman explores the concept of "creative destruction" and how innovation is poised to affect jobs, income inequality, mental health and more.

Duration:00:04:53

On Thanksgiving, a look back at colonial capitalism

11/22/2018
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Similar to today’s immigrants, the pilgrims journeyed to Plymouth, Massachusetts, in search of reprieve from the economic, political and religious hardship they faced in Europe. In order to survive, these settlers worked the land and sent profits back to investors in London. Paul Solman travels back to the 17th century to explore this early version of capitalism.

Duration:00:08:26

Why the rise of the electric scooter has been a bumpy ride

11/15/2018
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It began with just 10 electric scooters in Santa Monica, California, but soon sidewalks and streets were flooded with thousands of them. Essentially skateboards with handles that can be picked up and dropped off anywhere, they've been rolled out in scores of U.S. cities, where local officials have struggled to cope and residents have mixed feelings. Special correspondent Catherine Rampell reports.

Duration:00:09:28

Has Amazon selected its next headquarters?

11/8/2018
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For over a year, cities across North America have competed to lure Amazon's next headquarters, which the company said would bring up to 50,000 jobs to the chosen site. But as Paul Solman explains, new reports indicate the company may choose two smaller locations instead of one. John Yang speaks to the University of Toronto's Richard Florida, who has been critical of the bid process, for analysis.

Duration:00:08:36

Elderly Maine considers tax hike to fund universal home care

11/1/2018
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On November 6, Maine voters will consider a proposal to provide free home care to people 65 and older and those with disabilities. The plan, “Question 1” on the ballot, would be funded by an additional 3.8 percent tax on income over $128,400. While the program would serve populations in need, critics fear the tax increase would stall the state economy. Paul Solman talks to Mainers for more.

Duration:00:08:58

How these penny-pinchers retired in their 30s

10/25/2018
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Eschewing consumer culture, Pete Adeney, also known as Mr. Money Mustache, practices an extreme frugality that allowed him to retire at age 30. Avoiding car use, DIYing and investing in stock market index funds are among the tactics he and his fellow F.I.R.E. (Financial Independence Retire Early) devotees espouse. Paul Solman reports from Colorado in this installment of “Making Sense.”

Duration:00:09:27

Proposed immigration policy penalizes legal residents for use of public benefits

10/18/2018
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The Trump administration has proposed reinterpreting a piece of immigration law intended to screen whether legal immigrants are likely to be self-supporting or end up consuming public benefits. Known as the “public charge” rule, it’s sowing concern even among green card holders and permanent residents, who fear that signing up for social services may jeopardize their ability to stay in the U.S.

Duration:00:09:21

Loss of Chinese export market drives new ideas for repurposing recyclables

10/11/2018
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China’s decision to buy less recyclable material from the U.S. has prompted major questions about how we handle waste in America. What will we do with our abundance of plastic bottles and pizza boxes, if exporting them is no longer an option? As Paul Solman discovers, some local governments and businesses have devised innovative ways to reuse these items--and to educate consumers.

Duration:00:08:11

Why your recyclables might have no place to go

10/4/2018
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Until this year, China had been America's -- and the world's -- number one recycling market. But China has shut its doors to plastic waste, which could result by 2030 in more than 100 million tons of trash with nowhere to go. So how did our recycling become so reliant on a country half a world away? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.

Duration:00:08:05

This researcher taught us how to resist temptation

9/20/2018
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Researcher Walter Mischel’s most famous contribution was the marshmallow test, a widely replicated experiment that explored the connection between saving and psychology. Economics correspondent Paul Solman remembers Mischel, who died last week at the age of 88.

Duration:00:06:51

How the 2008 financial crisis crashed the economy and changed the world

9/13/2018
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Ten years ago this week, the collapse of Lehman Brothers became the signal event of the 2008 financial crisis. Its effects and the recession that followed, on income, wealth, disparity and politics are still with us. Economics correspondent Paul Solman walks through those events and consequences with historian Adam Tooze, author of "Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World."

Duration:00:08:11

How Wisconsin is trying to head off a major worker shortage

9/6/2018
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In Wisconsin, "Help Wanted" is on virtually every restaurant window, store front and city bus. With an aging population and few immigrants, the state could have a shortage of 45,000 workers by 2024, which could pose a threat to business. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.

Duration:00:08:28

Why recent stock market gains might not benefit the economy

8/23/2018
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This week has marked the longest uninterrupted stock market gains in U.S. history, thanks in part to a steady economic recovery now nine years old. But another driver is the growth of stock buybacks: companies purchasing their own shares. Whether this practice benefits the larger economy is very much in question. Economics correspondent Paul Solman has more in his weekly series, Making Sense.

Duration:00:06:03

The economic principle that powers this kidney donor market

8/16/2018
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A hundred thousand Americans are on a waiting list for a kidney from a deceased donor. But another option is the paired-organ exchange, which allows living kidney donors who are not a match with their intended recipient to network with others who are. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.

Duration:00:09:41

The U.S. needs more home care workers. Is this the solution?

8/9/2018
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America's home care shortage is critical, and growing. The industry's shortage seems to be driven by low wages, few benefits and a lack of respect for workers, 90 percent of whom are women. Would giving them more responsibilities and more training help workers earn more? In the second part of our reporting, economics correspondent Paul Solman takes a closer look at whether there is a solution.

Duration:00:07:14