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Te Ahi Kaa

RNZ New Zealand

The philosophy of Te Ahi Kaa is to reflect the diversity of Māori in the past, present and future. While bilingual in delivery, the programme incorporates Māori practices and values in its content, format and presentation.

The philosophy of Te Ahi Kaa is to reflect the diversity of Māori in the past, present and future. While bilingual in delivery, the programme incorporates Māori practices and values in its content, format and presentation.
More Information

Location:

Wellington, New Zealand

Description:

The philosophy of Te Ahi Kaa is to reflect the diversity of Māori in the past, present and future. While bilingual in delivery, the programme incorporates Māori practices and values in its content, format and presentation.

Language:

Multilingual

Contact:

123 The Terrace Wellington, New Zealand


Episodes

Whakatauki - A conversation with Dr Taiarahia Black

12/9/2018
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Te Ahi Kaa finds out more about proverbial sayings or whakatauki defined by Dr Hirini Mead as "succinct messages that place high value on certain aspects of human behaviour". Justine Murray joins Professor Taiarahia Black to contextualise the meanings of three whakatauāki that look at health, succession planning and the importance of hospitality.

Duration:00:30:13

Māori broadcaster Kingi Biddle on the pursuit of happiness

12/2/2018
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Kingi Biddle talks to Justine Murray about his definition of "rich" what he's learned about safe spaces, and how he deals with moments of depression.

Duration:00:24:48

In conversation with Maori artists Marilynn Webb and Isaac James Te Reina Cleland

11/25/2018
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Every year, Creative New Zealand pays tribute to Māori artists at the Te Waka Toi Awards. Justine Murray meets two of this year's winners – internationally renowned printmaker Marilynn Webb and emerging filmmaker Isaac James Te Reina Cleland.

Duration:00:29:03

The history of Te Reo o te Ratana Te Tuatoru

11/18/2018
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Inside the band room at Maungatapu Marae, a mix of adults gather for the brass band Te Reo o Te Rātana te Tuatoru's weekly practice. The whanau occasion brings together a mix of adults who are passionate about their Rātana faith and music. Te Reo o Te Rātana te Tuatoru is one of seven Rātana bands around New Zealand – each with their own distinctive blazer colour – which are collectively known as Ngā Reo. This week, Justine Murray finds out more about Te Reo o Te Rātana te Tuatoru in the...

Duration:00:27:52

The history of Te Reo o Hamuera

11/11/2018
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Thousands of Morehu (Rātana followers) descended upon Rātana Pa on November 8th, to commemorate one hundred years of the Maramatanga – when, in 1918, Tahupotiki Wiremu Rātana received the divine message from the Wairua Tapu (Holy Spirit) and the Rātana faith was born. Te Ahi Kaa looks at one aspect of the faith, the church's famous Nga Reo Rātana brass bands.

Duration:00:28:08

Dr Rachel Buchanan: 'The shame of Parihaka is so great it can never end'

11/4/2018
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One hundred and thirty-seven years ago, on 5 November 1881, a Māori settlement in the small Taranaki township of Parihaka was ransacked by colonial troops. Dr Rachel Buchanan says the writing of her book Ko Taranaki te Maunga was a cathartic process after she lost her father Leo Buchanan to cancer. We also hear an archival recording of the late Te Miringa Hohaia talking about Taranaki leader Titokowaru and the impact that legislation had on the people of Parihaka.

Duration:00:29:28

Te Ahi Kaa features a presentation from Sir Wira Gardiner

10/28/2018
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To mark the National Day of the 19th century New Zealand Wars Te Ahi Kaa features a keynote presentation from Sir Wira Gardiner who talks about the impact, scale and price of War. (This first featured at the 2017 symposium Te Putake o te Riri)

Duration:00:28:15

Dr Patu Hohepa and Edna Pahewa

10/21/2018
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This week Te Ahi Kaa talks about the past present and future of the Maori language with linguist Dr Patu Hohepa, and Edna Pahewa talks about the work of her mum, renowned weaver Emily Schuster and her work to ensure the sustainability of harakeke in the region.

Duration:00:22:42

Foraging with Chef Charles Royal

10/13/2018
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Chef Charles Royal began as a cook in the army, which lead to four years as a Gourmet Chef with Air New Zealand, a restaurant owner in Paraparaumu and Rotorua, and today as the owner of Kinaki, a business that specialises in native plants and herbs. Justine Murray takes a tiki tour with Charles and goes foraging at Matawhaura forest on the outskirts of Rotorua.

Duration:00:29:02

The science project using indigenous Māori knowledge to increase NZ's resilience to natural hazards

10/7/2018
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How can we as a nation better respond to natural hazards like tsunamis and floods? New Zealand scientists and researchers are exploring Matauranga Māori (Māori indigenous knowledge) for the Resilience Challenge – an ambitious nationwide project exploring New Zealand's resilience to such hazards. Justine Murray meets three people involved – social scientist Dr Wendy Saunders who's been working with iwi and hapū in the Bay of Plenty, Māori social scientist Lucy Carter who's teaching disaster...

Duration:00:34:18

Dr Dan Hikuroa and Kristie-Lee Thomas on science and Mātauranga Māori

9/30/2018
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Dr Dan Hikuroa is an Earth systems scientist and believes the world of science is interconnected with Mātauranga Māori (customary knowledge systems) he shares his recent work alongside iwi and hapu. In 1868 a tsunami hit the Chatham Islands in the early hours of the morning on August 15. Kristie-Lee Thomas inspired to pursue a career in science, and given she and her family lived there, she based research on the disaster and shares some of her findings.

Duration:00:32:18

Dr Dan Hikuroa and Kristie-Lee Thomas on science and Mātauranga Māori.

9/30/2018
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Dr Dan Hikuroa is an Earth Systems Scientist and believes the world of science is interconnected with Mātauranga Māori (customary knowledge systems) he shares his recent work alongside iwi and hapu. In 1868 a tsunami hit the Chatham Islands in the early hours of the morning on August 15.Kristie-Lee Thomas inspired to pursue a career in science, and given she and her family lived there, she based research on the disaster and shares some of her findings.

Duration:00:32:18

Dr Rangi Nicholson and Rob Ruha: lifting the Māori language to lofty heights

9/23/2018
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Reverend Dr Rangi Nicholson was a student at Victoria University in 1971 and was given the role of media publicist leading up to the Māori language Petition in 1972, he says he was often standing behind the camera that took the iconic photographs at parliament. Rob Ruha fosters the language in his home and his work as a musician, he won four awards at this years Waiata Māori Music Awards. Rob talks about fostering te reo Māori and the vernacular of the language spoken in his community on...

Duration:00:29:23

Vini Olsen-Reeder and Ria Hall: keeping Māori language alive and thriving

9/16/2018
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Māori language lecturer Dr Vini Olsen Reeder and songwriter Ria Hall talk about their personal relationships with te reo. Olsen-Reeder began studying te reo as a university student and became the first person to complete a PhD thesis in te reo Māori at Victoria University. Hall grew up as a first-generation 'Kōhanga Reo kid' and the Māori language is integral to her work.

Duration:00:30:42

'My life is enriched by learning Te Reo Māori'

9/9/2018
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Pat Old's grandchildren can speak Maori and her daughters have married into Maori families, this was the reason why she is learning te reo Maori part time with Te Wananga o Aotearoa. Pat says the language has enriched her life. Justin Kereama has taught the language for fifteen years, most of his students are retirees and keen to learn te reo, in the lead-up to Maori language week, both share their stories.

Duration:00:26:56

Standing up for Te Reo Māori - reflections from founding member of the Te Reo Māori Society

9/2/2018
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John McCaffery was raised Irish Catholic and while his great grandfathers were fluent in Gaelic, and his father could understand it, it wasn't spoken in the home. This narrative is similar to the experience of many Māori families. John has worked in literacy and linguistics for most of his life. An original member of the Te Reo Māori Society, the retired lecturer is now a doctoral student with the aim of capturing the stories of the Māori language petition and the key figures involved.

Duration:00:31:15

How memories of her Māori girls boarding school inspire artist Maraea Timutimu

8/26/2018
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Rotorua artist and high school teacher Maraea Timutimu uses poi made of bread packets and cameo-style portraits in sculptural work that recalls her formative years at Queen Victoria Māori Girls Boarding School.

Duration:00:25:04

Māori language in theatre a way to nurture and grow the language

8/19/2018
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Taki Rua Productions are mid-way through the Te Reo Māori season with the play Hine Kihāwai as it continues its ten week tour around the country. Roimata Fox (Waru, The Pa Boyz) and Eds Eramiha (Mahana, The Deadlands) are part of a small cast performing at marae, schools and venues around Aotearoa. During one of their stops in the Bay of Plenty, Te Ahi Kaa meets up with the pair to talk about their career on stage and on-screen.

Duration:00:27:51

Exhibition a tribute to wāhine stance on the marae

8/12/2018
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Hinewirangi Kohu Morgan uses Tāonga Pūoro (Māori instruments) as a tool of healing with victims of sexual assault. In the exhibition The Right to Speak she has created a carved hue (gourd), based on a story retold to her from a fellow Hawaiian artist. Te Ahi Kaa meets four artists whose art reflects their identity, history and research.

Duration:00:30:18

Māori illustrator sets his sights set on graphic novels and animation

8/5/2018
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Te Haunui Tuna works as a taa moko (traditional Māori tattoo) artist but his true passion is sketching Māori gods in pencil.

Duration:00:24:50