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Ancestors Alive! Genealogy: From Paper To People

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The #1 job of genealogy is to take ancestors from names on paper to multidimensional people who lived, breathed, loved, lost, and helped us to be who we are. I'll teach you how to maximize online research tools like Ancestry, FamilySearch, Newspapers.com, and Findagrave, best evidence and best practices, and how to use folklore to find leads and to add color to your tree. I always add stories from my 38 years of mistakes and triumphs in genealogy, folklore, and family history work, and there's usually a tablespoon or so of snark. Together, we'll focus on cooperative and reparational genealogy, and how Anglo- or European-American researchers can work with African-American researchers to restore connections destroyed by centuries of enslavement. I also interview researchers in genealogy and related fields in all phases of their growth, and I even talk about ancestral meals in the Family Cookbook episodes. Join me!

The #1 job of genealogy is to take ancestors from names on paper to multidimensional people who lived, breathed, loved, lost, and helped us to be who we are. I'll teach you how to maximize online research tools like Ancestry, FamilySearch, Newspapers.com, and Findagrave, best evidence and best practices, and how to use folklore to find leads and to add color to your tree. I always add stories from my 38 years of mistakes and triumphs in genealogy, folklore, and family history work, and there's usually a tablespoon or so of snark. Together, we'll focus on cooperative and reparational genealogy, and how Anglo- or European-American researchers can work with African-American researchers to restore connections destroyed by centuries of enslavement. I also interview researchers in genealogy and related fields in all phases of their growth, and I even talk about ancestral meals in the Family Cookbook episodes. Join me!
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

The #1 job of genealogy is to take ancestors from names on paper to multidimensional people who lived, breathed, loved, lost, and helped us to be who we are. I'll teach you how to maximize online research tools like Ancestry, FamilySearch, Newspapers.com, and Findagrave, best evidence and best practices, and how to use folklore to find leads and to add color to your tree. I always add stories from my 38 years of mistakes and triumphs in genealogy, folklore, and family history work, and there's usually a tablespoon or so of snark. Together, we'll focus on cooperative and reparational genealogy, and how Anglo- or European-American researchers can work with African-American researchers to restore connections destroyed by centuries of enslavement. I also interview researchers in genealogy and related fields in all phases of their growth, and I even talk about ancestral meals in the Family Cookbook episodes. Join me!

Language:

English

Contact:

631-350-1898


Episodes

A Family Horror Story

1/15/2019
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Wow, was this weekend big! Correcting one set of errors about my grand-aunt led me to find an absolutely horrific story about her, her husband, and her children. I'm telling it to you in all its gory glory, ruminating a bit on how my great-grandparents were responsible for parts of it, and drawing what genealogical lessons and morals I can from it and passing those on to you. Honestly, it's the worst story I've ever run across in my tree, involving orphan's asylums, mental hospitals,...

Duration:00:19:13

Using Genie Twitter to Build Community

1/8/2019
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Happy New Year, and welcome to Season 2! I meet so many people who have no idea about that which should not be a well-kept secret: Twitter is fantastic for genealogists! If you do the right things in the right ways (yes, of COURSE I'll teach you those), you can build a community for yourself in the genealogy section of Twitter. People are funny, kind, helpful, and they will not only help you, they'll give you the opportunity to help them with their research. Strap in and come for a ride with...

Duration:00:24:15

Cookies of Christmas Past

12/22/2018
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In Western culture, what's the most important Christmas food? The Christmas cookie! There are entire baking competition TV series about the creation and decoration of Christmas cookies. There are entire family traditions about families baking and distributing Christmas cookies. There are secret recipes, national recipes, traditional recipes. In fact, it's become kind-of an obsession in the United States. I'm reaching back to the late 19th- and early 20th-century for cookie recipes (along...

Duration:00:15:52

The Genie News - Podcast Edition

12/9/2018
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Time for a quick episode of The Genie News, to keep you apprised of a week of good things and some things you might not have known. Listen to the end for the best news of all! The podcast is now on iHeartRADIO - you can catch it on ALL SORTS of devices using the app, or catch it online at goo.gl/YuLTe8. I give a complete breakdown of all the goodies you can get for giving at all available levels at Patreon (yes, including SWAG). We talk for a moment about the Facebook group, the future, and...

Duration:00:07:17

A Yankee Thanksgiving, 1895

12/5/2018
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Have you ever wondered what an old-fashioned, 19th-century, British-traditioned Yankee Thanksgiving was like? In the land of the original Pilgrims, did they really eat turkey? This episode draws on recipes from a November, 1895 issue of The Boston Globe and in it we'll explore recipes that go all the way back to the 16th century in England. We'll also learn whether mince pies really contain minced meat, whether there are plums in plum pudding, and we'll see by comparison to a menu from El...

Duration:00:25:47

Group Folklore for the Holidays

11/18/2018
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We're talking folklore again, but this time about the hardest gathering challenge of all: you vs. a room full of your family or friends at holiday celebrations. I'll tell you about my first folklore gathering assignment at age 18, which was me vs. an Irish folk band called Dolores Keane and Reel Union. I was recovering from mononucleosis, and they plied me with Guinness until I couldn't see straight. Suffice it to say that you can learn from my mistakes. Then, I'll recommend Nancy Candea and...

Duration:00:22:30

Diwali Lakshmi (the Hindu Festival of Lights), 2005-2006

11/10/2018
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I'm back after a brief illness-induced break, and while I'm not up to teaching yet, I am definitely here to celebrate! How much do YOU know about Diwali? I knew basically nothing but the name until I put this episode together. This is the final day of Diwali, and isn't it our good luck that they celebrate with food? Listen to learn about the holiday and its meanings, its means of celebration, and for some delicious recipes for sweets and savories from Indian cuisine. These recipes come from...

Duration:00:23:52

Depression-Era Halloween in Miami with Colonel Goodbody, 1932

10/18/2018
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It's Episode 3 in our bonus series for Fall - vintage recipes mix with straight-up US history this week as we talk about how the Great Depression changed what newspapers did to extend assistance to housewives at the holidays. I'll be doing this throughout October, November, and December, for all of the seasonal holidays. Today's recipes come from the October 28, 1932 issue of The Miami Daily News. There's an unexpected twist, though - the newspaper doesn't focus on candy and sweets and silly...

Duration:00:23:13

Halloween Candy, Cookies and a DRAGON, 1904

10/11/2018
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It's Episode 2 in our bonus series for Fall - vintage recipes, foodways, social and cultural history culled from early- to mid-20th century newspapers. We're hitting all the holidays that fall in October, November, and December, including Kwanzaa - but I may need your help with that. The recipes I've found in newspapers so far are so corporatized it's ill. Today continues the Halloween, or Samhain, theme. All of these recipes come from the October 23, 1904 issue of The Buffalo Sunday Morning...

Duration:00:12:59

Come, Come, Ye Saints - Cross Over From Ancestry To FamilySearch!

10/6/2018
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So, Latter-Day Saints, your family history is all done, right? WRONG!!! Not only can you work on your tree more (another nag for another day), you can use your special powers in Ancestry to benefit non-Church researchers. You can transfer their ancestors, and all of the research attached to them, from Ancestry to FamilySearch using the FamilySearch icon that only WE have in our Ancestry accounts. But this episode isn't just for members of the Church. This episode is a great way for...

Duration:00:21:26

Homemade Halloween Candy, 1913

10/2/2018
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Welcome to a new feature for Fall - a bonus series in addition to regular episodes, a jump backward in cooking and cultural history. Since October, November, and December all contain holidays celebrated with food, I will be digging into newspaper archives and giving you recipes from early- to mid-20th century newspapers every week, or in some cases, family recipes where newspaper coverage falls short. This month, we'll be enjoying all kinds of recipes that celebrate Halloween, or Samhain....

Duration:00:11:19

The Family Cookbook - Gingerbread Waffles

9/26/2018
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It's Autumn, but who needs Pumpkin Spice EVERYTHING when you can join me and our Midwest Food Correspondent, Rick Leonard of An American Genealogy for an old family recipe - Gingerbread Waffles. And because they're homemade, YOU control the spice! We talk a bit about the value of food in the Progressive movement of the Republican and Democratic Parties of the 20th centuries (yes, BOTH had progressive wings - read your history, folks), the value of keeping up ancestral traditions in the...

Duration:00:15:50

Interview with Amy Johnson Crow - Indexing and Arbitration

9/18/2018
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Have you ever wondered where all of those digitized versions of birth records, census pages, or city directories come from? Well, there is no Genealogy Stork. While quite a few organizations provide opportunities and services, the primary way that records are turned from physical page to scanned image to searchable electronic data is a process called indexing, and the three-step indexing process that FamilySearch provides includes a final step called arbitration. I don't know enough about...

Duration:00:57:33

Ancestry: What I Hate About New

9/11/2018
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Ancestry's Summer of Pain seems to have ended, but what does Autumn look like? And have they left us in the Winter of our discontent? They're answering their phones again, the screens seem more stable, but their primary new feature, Potential Parents, is a wolf in sheep's clothing for any genealogist who wants to use best evidence and best practices to do their best work. Revel in my wrath as I discuss why this is not a good development, why the re-indexing of the 1870 census was a...

Duration:00:34:19

The Family Cookbook - Emily's Casserole

8/14/2018
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Family ties, a slight genealogical mystery, a discussion of privilege, 19th and 20th-century classism in Midwestern America, and the value of comfort food all converge in this week's episode of The Family Cookbook. And, we welcome our new Food Correspondent, Rick Leonard of An American Genealogy! Rick shares with us the backstory of a family member who wasn't blood but who was central to his family for four generations, and then shares her recipe for a simple, hearty casserole, known to the...

Duration:00:21:48

Interview with Joseph McGill, The Slave Dwelling Project

8/6/2018
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This episode is a special treat, an interview with Joseph McGill about his incredible labor of love, The Slave Dwelling Project. He shares with us his background, his motivations, and what it's really like to encounter children and adults as an educator and historic preservationist in the rarefied yet crucial field of preserving the history of the enslaved in a world that speaks almost exclusively about the plantation owners and enslavers of history. We talk about the places where genealogy...

Duration:00:43:46

Using Public Records Databases to Find the Living and Recently-Deceased

7/30/2018
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Have you ever looked someone up on one of those reverse-phone-number sites to see who the heck is calling you at 2am? Did you know that those sites, and the apps that go with them, are great for genealogy? In this episode I'll discuss my favorite, BeenVerified, and how I use it to find generations of family members when I'm shrubbing, and when I'm working with someone whose parentage is unclear and who is using DNA for research. Family trees need all the help that they can get; public...

Duration:00:33:22

The Family Cookbook - Johnny Mazetti, or is it Marzetti?

7/16/2018
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Did you know that family recipes have their own genealogy? I thought I was skimming yet another back-of-the-magazine recipe in a special family cookbook when I Googled Johnny Mazetti, and then one of its key ingredients, Sauce Arturo. It wasn't as simple as I thought. And it made me wonder: did my grandmother pick this recipe up in the Midwest, or did my grandfather's mother pick it up in Panama? A rather big question! I will never find the true answer, but I have solved it to my own...

Duration:00:22:58

How To Build a Life - John Joseph Dalain

7/10/2018
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I talk a lot about component parts, or the basic how-to's of handling records, but what about the how-to's of building one person's life in your family tree? Genealogy has become an immediate-gratification online phenomenon, but it's not always that at all. How long should a 21st-century online researcher be expected to wait before work is done on any one person in their tree? This episode takes on that question, and replies with my ongoing battle to complete details about one person - my...

Duration:00:31:49

The Family Cookbook - The Hinzie Family Cornbread

7/2/2018
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For our inaugural episode of the folkloric and gastronomic aspects of family history, I'm presenting a staple recipe from my family's cookbook. It entered my family with my mother's mother's stepmother, and every generation that has made it has put a unique twist on it since. Ethel "Itey" Garrard Drahos Hinzie, who brought it into the family with her marriage to my great-grandfather in 1935, was born in Indiana in 1886. My grandmother took over the recipe when she married in 1931. She, in...

Duration:00:12:08