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EJIL: The Podcast!

Education Podcasts

EJIL: The Podcast! aims to provide in-depth, expert and accessible discussion of international law issues in contemporary international and national affairs. It features the Editors of the European Journal of International Law and of its blog, EJIL: Talk! The podcast is produced by the European Journal of Law with support from staff at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford.

EJIL: The Podcast! aims to provide in-depth, expert and accessible discussion of international law issues in contemporary international and national affairs. It features the Editors of the European Journal of International Law and of its blog, EJIL: Talk! The podcast is produced by the European Journal of Law with support from staff at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford.

Location:

United Kingdom

Description:

EJIL: The Podcast! aims to provide in-depth, expert and accessible discussion of international law issues in contemporary international and national affairs. It features the Editors of the European Journal of International Law and of its blog, EJIL: Talk! The podcast is produced by the European Journal of Law with support from staff at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford.

Twitter:

@ejiltalk

Language:

English


Episodes

Episode 17: What’s wrong with the international law on jurisdiction?

10/4/2022
What conduct occurring where are states allowed to regulate? The international law on jurisdiction provides part of the answer. But international lawyers use different images when conceptualising the geographical reach of states' jurisdiction to prescribe their laws. In this podcast, the two contenders in a debate in https://academic.oup.com/ejil/issue/33/2 (issue 33(2)) of the European Journal of International Law engage with each other’s images and their ensuing conclusions as to the...

Duration:00:37:36

Episode 16: Disputing Archives

4/27/2022
In the third episode of ‘Reckonings with Europe: Pasts and Present’, James Lowry and Meredith Terretta take up the object of archives: how law conceptualizes the archives of states; the ‘displaced’, ‘disputed’ or ‘migrated’ archives left when empires and states are reconstituted; and what state archives can and cannot tell us. Works mentioned, in order of mention: James Lowry (ed), https://www.routledge.com/Displaced-Archives/Lowry/p/book/9780367193072 (Displaced Archives) (Routledge, 2017)...

Duration:00:37:12

Episode 15: Now or Never, Or Maybe Later: The Use of Force to Recover an Occupied Territory

3/23/2022
This episode accompanies the launching of a new rubric in the European Journal of International Law – Legal/Illegal. The first installment of Legal/Illegal, which appears in issue 32(4), focuses on the question whether the use of force by a state to recover a territory that has been occupied for many years may be considered a lawful act of self-defence. In the Podcast, Michal Saliternik interviews the authors of this section: Tom Ruys and Felipe Rodriguez Silvestre on the illegal side, and...

Duration:00:47:39

Episode 14: From Russia With War

3/6/2022
In this episode Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic and Philippa Webb, joined by Rebecca Barber and Mike Becker, examine various aspects of Russia’s war on Ukraine. The discussion begins with an evaluation of Russia’s legal justification for invading Ukraine, moving to an analysis of the responses to Russia’s aggression by the UN General Assembly and the Security Council. We then turn to the proceedings brought by Ukraine against Russia before the International Court of Justice pursuant to the...

Duration:00:56:03

Episode 13: Loot!

12/13/2021
In this second instalment of the 'Reckonings with Europe: Pasts and Present' series, Evelien Campfens, Chika Okeke-Agulu and Dan Hicks reflect on calls for return of cultural artefacts looted under European empire. How does (international) law respond to these calls? Does law even matter—and if so which kind? Who resists return, and why? And what might return mean today? Select texts and reports discussed: Felwine Sarr & Bénédicte Savoy, http://restitutionreport2018.com/sarr_savoy_en.pdf...

Duration:00:51:32

Episode 12: No Licence to Kill

10/18/2021
In this episode Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic and Philippa Webb discuss the legal issues that arise from targeted killings conducted by states outside their territory. They begin with a discussion of the recent blockbuster judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the case concerning the killing in London in 2006 of the Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko. They talk about how the Court dealt with the attribution of the killing to Russia and then explore the extraterritorial...

Duration:00:44:12

Episode 11: The Limelight on ESIL!

8/27/2021
In this episode of the podcast, Joseph Weiler is joined by Helene Ruiz-Fabri, Photini Pazartzis and Marko Milanovic, to discuss the EJIL’s sister institution, the European Society of International Law (ESIL) – its foundation, mission, governance, and plans for the future, including the forthcoming annual conference in Stockholm.

Duration:00:43:31

Episode 10: Whatever happened to International Law & Democracy?

7/28/2021
Whatever happened to https://academic.oup.com/ejil/article/32/1/9/6305932 (International Law & Democracy)? Accompanying the https://academic.oup.com/ejil/issue/32/1 (Symposium) on that question in EJIL issue 32(1), this podcast contains a duel between anti-anti-international-law& democracy scholar https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/law/staff/akbarrasulov/ (Akbar Rasulov) and anti-international law & democracy scholar https://law.wayne.edu/profile/aa2216 (Brad Roth). Hosted by EJIL Editor in Chief...

Duration:00:41:17

Episode 9: Reviewing Book Reviewing

7/2/2021
Which author of a legal monograph has not had that frustrating feeling -- Why is my book not getting reviewed (and his or her book is...!)? And yet, in one of the many exquisite paradoxes of academic life, all Book Review editors of legal journals will attest to the difficulty of getting colleagues to accept to do a book review. 'I have to read that book carefully (i.e. going beyond the index and checking if I am cited and whether the engagement with my work is ok) and then write a couple of...

Duration:00:30:45

Episode 8: After the Fall

5/20/2021
In this new series, 'Reckonings with Europe: Pasts and Present', Surabhi Ranganathan and Megan Donaldson host conversations about enduring legacies of empire, capitalism, and racism in international law and the legal academy. Joined by Matthew Smith, Mezna Qato, and Rahul Rao, they open the series with a discussion about statues, less tangible legacies woven into institutions, and the place of law in struggles about pasts and futures.

Duration:00:36:26

Episode 7: “Walking Back Human Rights in Europe?” An Interview with Laurence Helfer and Erik Voeten

3/4/2021
In this podcast, EJIL editor Sarah Nouwen interviews Laurence Helfer and Erik Voeten about their article “Walking Back Human Rights in Europe?”, published in EJIL issue 31(3). What does it mean to “walk back human rights”? One day one has a human right and the next day no longer? And how does one assess whether human rights are being walked back? But also: how does one keep a single voice in a co-authored text?

Duration:00:27:33

Episode 6: Trumping International Law?

1/31/2021
This episode examines the effects of the four years of the Trump Administration on international law. Dapo Akande is joined by Joseph Weiler, Neha Jain and Chimene Keitner. In their conversation, they explore the impact of the last four years on the future of multilateralism. They discuss the impact of Trump policies on international institutions such as the World Trade Organization and the International Criminal Court. Did those policies simply expose weaknesses in those institutions? How...

Duration:00:31:02

Episode 5: Breaking Bad - in a Specific and Limited Way

9/27/2020
In this episode Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic, Sarah Nouwen and Philippa Webb analyse the Internal Market Bill currently pending before the UK Parliament, which the UK government’s own legal officers admit breaches international law by reneging on parts of the Withdrawal Agreement with the European Union and the Northern Ireland Protocol thereto that the UK had freely entered into less than a year ago. The team discuss why the UK government has put this Bill forward, how it is fairly unique...

Duration:00:36:36

Episode 4: Court between a Rock and a Hard Place

8/1/2020
The International Criminal Court has for a long time been criticised for exclusively focusing on Africa, as opposed to investigating situations in which powerful western states are heavily involved or have strong interests. In the first part of this podcast Kamari Clarke joins Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic, Sarah Nouwen and Philippa Webb to discuss whether black lives matter before the ICC and whether it can deal with structural injustice. The second part of the podcast discusses some of the...

Duration:00:39:10

Episode 3: Hacked Off!

6/11/2020
With cyberattacks against the health care sector on the rise, this episode focuses on international law and cyber operations, especially in the context of the fight against COVID-19. For this discussion, Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic, & Sarah Nouwen are joined by Harriet Moynihan (Chatham House), and Tilman Rodenhäuser (International Committee of the Red Cross). They consider whether international law imposes obligations on states to refrain from such attacks having effect in other states....

Duration:00:40:39

Episode 2: WHO let the bats out?

5/5/2020
Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic, Sarah Nouwen and Philippa Webb are joined by Gian Luca Burci, former Legal Counsel of the World Health Organization, to discuss international health law and pandemics. They discuss the obligations arising under the WHO's International Health Regulations, as well as various attempts to hold states and organizations (China, the US, the WHO) accountable in a variety of domestic and international courts. Moving from the virus to immunity, the final segment discusses...

Duration:00:39:42

Episode 1: Contagion

4/16/2020
Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic, Sarah Nouwen and Philippa Webb discuss the compatibility with international human rights law of the measures taken by states in the fight against the corona virus. Do states have a duty to cooperate in tackling the virus? Should they derogate from rights provided for in human rights treaties or are those rights flexible enough to permit the measures being taken? What measures can be taken to combat misinformation relating to the virus? They end with one of the...

Duration:00:42:54