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TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing

TED

TED-Ed's commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED's mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed's growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com).

TED-Ed's commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED's mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed's growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com).
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Location:

United States

Networks:

TED

Description:

TED-Ed's commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED's mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed's growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com).

Language:

English


Episodes

From DNA to Silly Putty, the diverse world of polymers - Jan Mattingly

7/12/2019
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You are made of polymers, and so are trees and telephones and toys. A polymer is a long chain of identical molecules (or monomers) with a range of useful properties, like toughness or stretchiness -- and it turns out, we just can't live without them. Polymers occur both naturally -- our DNA is a polymer -- and synthetically, like plastic, Silly Putty and styrofoam. Jan Mattingly explains how polymers have changed our world.

Duration:00:05:00

The death of the universe - Renée Hlozek

7/12/2019
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The shape, contents and future of the universe are all intricately related. We know that it's mostly flat; we know that it's made up of baryonic matter (like stars and planets), but mostly dark matter and dark energy; and we know that it's expanding constantly, so that all stars will eventually burn out into a cold nothingness. Renée Hlozek expands on the beauty of this dark ending.

Duration:00:04:34

The motion of the ocean - Sasha Wright

7/5/2019
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The constant motion of our oceans represents a vast and complicated system involving many different drivers. Sasha Wright explains the physics behind one of those drivers -- the concentration gradient -- and illustrates how our oceans are continually engaging in a universal struggle for space.

Duration:00:05:19

An athlete uses physics to shatter world records - Asaf Bar-Yosef

7/5/2019
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When Dick Fosbury couldn't compete against the skilled high jumpers at his college, he tried jumping in a different way -- backwards. Fosbury improved his record immediately and continued to amaze the world with his new technique all the way to Olympic gold. Asaf Bar-Yosef explains the physics behind the success of the now dominant Fosbury Flop.

Duration:00:03:50

Is radiation dangerous? - Matt Anticole

6/28/2019
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When we hear the word radiation, it's tempting to picture huge explosions and frightening mutations. But that's not the full story — radiation also applies to rainbows and a doctor examining an X-ray. So what is it, really, and how much should we worry about its effects? Matt Anticole describes the different types of radiation

Duration:00:05:20

Can wildlife adapt to climate change? - Erin Eastwood

6/28/2019
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With rising temperatures and seas, massive droughts, and changing landscapes, successfully adapting to climate change is increasingly important. For humans, this can mean using technology to find solutions. But for some plants and animals, adapting to these changes involves the most ancient solution of all: evolution. Erin Eastwood explains how animals are adapting to climate change.

Duration:00:04:46

Why the octopus brain is so extraordinary - Cláudio L. Guerra

6/21/2019
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Octopuses have the ability to solve puzzles, learn through observation, and even use tools – just like humans. But what makes octopus intelligence so amazing is that it comes from a biological structure completely different from ours. Cláudio L. Guerra takes a look inside the amazing octopus brain.

Duration:00:04:16

The incredible collaboration behind the International Space Station - Tien Nguyen

6/21/2019
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The International Space Station is roughly the size of a six-bedroom house and weighs more than 320 cars -- it's so large that no single rocket could have lifted it into orbit. Instead, it was assembled piece by piece while hurtling through space at 28,000 kilometers per hour, lapping the Earth once every 90 minutes. Tien Nguyen explains how.

Duration:00:09:13

How a few scientists transformed the way we think about disease - Tien Nguyen

6/14/2019
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This video was created with support from the U.S. Office of Research Integrity: http://ori.hhs.gov. For several centuries, people though diseases were caused by wandering clouds of poisonous vapor. We now know that this theory is pretty ridiculous, and that diseases are caused by specific bacteria. But how did we get to this new idea of germ theory? Tien Nguyen describes the work of several scientists who discredited a widely accepted theory in a way that was beneficial to human health.

Duration:00:04:38

The race to sequence the human genome - Tien Nguyen

6/14/2019
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In 1990, The Human Genome Project proposed to sequence the entire human genome over 15 years with $3 billion of public funds. Then, seven years before its scheduled completion, a private company called Celera announced that they could accomplish the same goal in just three years at a fraction of the cost. Tien Nguyen details the history of this race to sequence the human genome.

Duration:00:04:59

The threat of invasive species - Jennifer Klos

6/7/2019
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Massive vines that blanket the southern United States, climbing high as they uproot trees and swallow buildings. A ravenous snake that is capable of devouring an alligator. Rabbit populations that eat themselves into starvation. These aren’t horror movie concepts – they’re real stories. But how could such situations exist in nature? Jennifer Klos gives the facts on invasive species.

Duration:00:04:46

How miscommunication happens (and how to avoid it) - Katherine Hampsten

6/7/2019
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Have you ever talked with a friend about a problem, only to realize that he just doesn't seem to grasp why the issue is so important to you? Have you ever presented an idea to a group, and it's met with utter confusion? What's going on here? Katherine Hampsten describes why miscommunication occurs so frequently, and how we can minimize frustration while expressing ourselves better.

Duration:00:04:33

Why the metric system matters - Matt Anticole

5/31/2019
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For the majority of recorded human history, units like the weight of a grain or the length of a hand weren't exact and varied from place to place. Now, consistent measurements are such an integral part of our daily lives that it's hard to appreciate what a major accomplishment for humanity they've been. Matt Anticole traces the wild history of the metric system.

Duration:00:05:07

How to turn protest into powerful change - Eric Liu

5/31/2019
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We live in an age of protest. On campuses, in public squares, on streets and social media, protestors around the world are challenging the status quo. But while protest is often necessary, is it sufficient? Eric Liu outlines three strategies for peacefully turning awareness into action and protest into durable political power.

Duration:00:04:56

Evolution in a big city - Jason Munshi-South

5/24/2019
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Using newts, coyotes and mice, Jason Munshi-South shows how animals develop genetic differences in evolution, even within an urban city.

Duration:00:05:08

How do we separate the seemingly inseparable? - Iddo Magen

5/24/2019
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Your cell phone is mainly made of plastics and metals. It's easy to appreciate the process by which those elements add up to something so useful. But there's another story we don't hear about -- how did we get our raw ingredients in the first place, from the chaotic tangle of materials that is nature? Iddo Magen uncovers the answer in a group of clever hacks known as separation techniques.

Duration:00:04:24

How does your body know what time it is? - Marco A. Sotomayor

5/17/2019
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Being able to sense time helps us do everything from waking and sleeping to knowing precisely when to catch a ball that’s hurtling towards us. And we owe all these abilities to an interconnected system of timekeepers in our brains. But how do they work? Marco A. Sotomayor details how human bodies naturally tell time.

Duration:00:05:02

Why is this painting so captivating? - James Earle and Christina Bozsik

5/17/2019
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On first glance, the painting “Las Meninas” (“The Maids of Honor”) might not seem terribly special, but it’s actually one of the most analyzed pieces in the history of art. Why is this painting by Diego Velazquez so captivating? James Earle and Christina Bozsik share the context and complexity behind this work of art.

Duration:00:03:58

The science of milk - Jonathan J. O'Sullivan

5/3/2019
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The milk industry produces in excess of 840 million tons of products each year. Why do humans drink so much milk? And given that all mammals lactate, why do we favor certain types of milk over others? Jonathan J. O’Sullivan describes how milk is made. Lesson by Jonathan J. O'Sullivan, animation by TED-Ed.

Duration:00:05:23

Meet the tardigrade, the toughest animal on Earth - Thomas Boothby

5/3/2019
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Without water, a human can only survive for about 100 hours. But there’s a creature so resilient that it can go without it for decades. This 1-millimeter animal can survive both the hottest and coldest environments on earth, and can even withstand high levels of radiation. Thomas Boothby introduces us to the tardigrade, one of the toughest creatures on Earth. Lesson by Thomas Boothby, animation by Boniato Studio.

Duration:00:04:10