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Talking the beat with leaders and experts. PoliceOne is the world’s most comprehensive and trusted online destination for law enforcement professionals, department decision-makers and industry experts. Founded in 1999, with more than 515,000 registered members representing more than 16,000 departments, PoliceOne effectively provides the law enforcement community with the information they need to protect their communities and come home safe after every shift.

Talking the beat with leaders and experts. PoliceOne is the world’s most comprehensive and trusted online destination for law enforcement professionals, department decision-makers and industry experts. Founded in 1999, with more than 515,000 registered members representing more than 16,000 departments, PoliceOne effectively provides the law enforcement community with the information they need to protect their communities and come home safe after every shift.
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Talking the beat with leaders and experts. PoliceOne is the world’s most comprehensive and trusted online destination for law enforcement professionals, department decision-makers and industry experts. Founded in 1999, with more than 515,000 registered members representing more than 16,000 departments, PoliceOne effectively provides the law enforcement community with the information they need to protect their communities and come home safe after every shift.

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English


Episodes

How environmental elements can help reduce crime

10/12/2018
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Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) is defined as a multi-disciplinary approach to deterring criminal behavior through environmental design. CPTED strategies rely upon the ability to influence offender decisions that precede criminal acts by affecting the built, social and administrative environment. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how architecture and landscaping, outdoor lighting, and other environmental elements can help to reduce crime.

Duration:00:12:43

The pros and cons of GPS tagging tech in vehicle pursuits

10/4/2018
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There is no argument that police pursuits can sometimes end in fatal collisions — crashes that kill fleeing suspects, police officers, and innocent bystanders. Police pursuits are an inherently dangerous endeavor. As some police agencies examine "no pursuit" policies, others are looking at new GPS tracking technologies that allow police to drop back and watch a monitor for where the suspect vehicle ends up. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the technology — the potential upside...

Duration:00:13:34

Detecting marijuana DUI and enforcing the law

9/28/2018
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DUI doesn't mean just alcohol — it means driving under the influence, and driving under the influence of marijuana is a crime in every state in America. The trick is detecting the impairment, which is now only really done with field sobriety tests — there is no breathalyzer for marijuana, although some companies are getting close to solving that riddle. In this podcast segment Jim and Doug discuss the difficulty with detecting and enforcing impaired driving as a result of marijuana...

Duration:00:12:57

How to prevent police officers from dying by suicide

9/21/2018
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At the time of this recording session, 92 police officers in America have died by suicide. In Chicago, three officers died by suicide in the span of one month. In 2017 that number was 154, and in 2016 there were 138 verified instances in which an officer died by suicide. And these are just the officers we know about. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the warning signs for officers to watch out for of a colleague potentially approaching crisis, as well as available resources for...

Duration:00:13:10

Policing the homeless

9/14/2018
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According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development there are more than 553,000 homeless people nationwide. California alone has an estimated 134,000 homeless individuals. Homelessness in and of itself is not a crime, but a lot of things that go along with it are crimes, and citizens rightly want the crimes taking place on the sidewalks in front of their homes and businesses to stop. The trouble is, even for the most serious crimes, the offenders are usually back out on the...

Duration:00:13:33

How to stay healthy on the job

9/7/2018
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One cannot understate the importance for officers to eat right and stay in shape in order to tackle whatever comes their way on patrol. Officers need to have muscular strength to overcome resistant subjects. They need speed and endurance to apprehend a subject fleeing on foot. Another great physical asset is flexibility, which can help reduce the likelihood of injury. There are most definitely officers out there who are truly specimens of physical wellness. There are others who are not in...

Duration:00:11:30

What it takes to be a great police leader

8/31/2018
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We all know bad leadership when we see it. It couldn't be more plain or obvious when a person in a position of authority loses (or never had) the commitment or allegiance of the people over whom they have authority. It's equally clear when we're in the presence of a great leader — someone we'd follow into hell with nothing but a bucket of water and a hastily assembled plan. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the traits of a good leader.

Duration:00:11:58

Are American cops really all that 'militarized'?

8/24/2018
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In recent years, protesters, politicians, and some members of the press have decried what they call the "militarization" of American law enforcement. Citing things like the acquisition of equipment through the 1033 program — which has enabled law enforcement agencies to remain effective despite diminishing budgets — critics have said that police in America are too heavily armed and armored. What they don't realize is that compared to many police agencies around the world, the average cop in...

Duration:00:11:41

What does de-escalation really mean?

7/18/2018
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De-escalation is the latest buzzword. A couple of weeks ago, we spoke about a Seattle officer who faced some manner of “disciplinary action” for taking down an axe-wielding man because he failed to de-escalate the situation. But de-escalation is not a tactic like Verbal Judo utilizing Dr. George Thompson's concepts or some other communications wizardry. De-escalation is a desired end state. It is doing what is necessary to take a volatile and/or violent situation and making it less volatile...

Duration:00:11:31

Are prison reform efforts working?

7/13/2018
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The DOJ recently released an updated study from the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) showing that 83 percent of prisoners released by states under so-called “jailbreak” programs were re-arrested within nine years of their release. Astonishingly, just days after the DOJ report was released, the House of Representatives passed a “prison reform” bill by a margin of 360–59. Dubbed the First Step Act (short for Formerly Incarcerated Reenter Society Transformed Safely Transitioning Every Person...

Duration:00:12:49

Is de-escalation getting more cops in trouble?

7/6/2018
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Video recently surfaced showing a Seattle officer taking down an axe-wielding man with a come-from-behind open-field tackle worthy of a Sportcenter highlight. The officer subsequently faced some manner of “disciplinary action” for the apprehension. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the overreaction of supervisors to harshly remind us that no good deed ever goes unpunished.

Duration:00:10:59

How should cops handle bad 911 calls?

6/29/2018
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In mid-April, cops were called to a Philadelphia Starbucks because two patrons who happened to be black refused to either make a purchase or leave the establishment. A Yale University student who was napping in a common room was awakened and questioned by police after a fellow student called 911 and said that the woman didn’t look like she belonged there. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the fact that cops are increasingly called to various non-events and how they should handle...

Duration:00:10:44

Smarter policing with the ASEBP

6/22/2018
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For the past three podcast segments Jim and Doug have been joined by Vallejo Police Lieutenant Jason Potts, who brought to the table the value of scientific method in determining policing strategies and tactics. Those conversations have (hopefully) increased listeners' interest in finding ways to use concepts like SARA (Scanning, Analysis, Response, and Assessment) and POP (Problem-Oriented Policing). In this podcast segment, Dudley, Wyllie, and Potts talk about The American Society of...

Duration:00:14:40

Problem-oriented policing and crime prevention

6/15/2018
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During the 2017 holiday shopping season, Vallejo (Calif.) police conducted a crime prevention campaign aimed at reducing auto burglaries in the parking lots of the major shopping centers in their jurisdiction. The campaign, entitled “Hide it, Lock it, Take it” included crime awareness fliers and billboards, undercover surveillance, increased marked patrols, and even decoy cars. Following the campaign, VPD utilized the SARA (Scanning, Analysis, Response, and Assessment) concepts developed by...

Duration:00:13:53

How evidence-based policing helps agencies do better work

6/8/2018
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When the Vallejo (Calif.) Police Department began considering the purchase of Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs), they didn’t just take the vendor’s word that the equipment would be successful in helping to capture criminals and reduce crime. Command Staff wanted to have proof, so with the assistance of a group of researchers from New York University, they employed what has become known as Evidence-Based Policing. They conducted a randomized control trial, which allows researchers to...

Duration:00:13:25

Unintended consequences of California's Prop 47

6/1/2018
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In 2014, California voters overwhelmingly (59 percent to 41 percent) passed Proposition 47, a law that downgraded a variety of crimes — such as burglary, shoplifting, and grand theft — from felonies to misdemeanors. If the value of the stolen property is under $950, the perpetrator will likely receive no penalty, creating a “green light” for bicycle thieves. “A thief may now steal something under that limit on a daily basis and it will never rise to felony status,” said the National Review...

Duration:00:13:16

Using DNA evidence in police investigations

5/25/2018
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In late April, police arrested a 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo for a series of rapes and murders committed in the 1970s and 1980s. Dangelo (a.k.a. the Golden State Killer) was apprehended when a surreptitiously obtained DNA sample matched the DNA of relative on the other side of the country who had registered with a website and service that enables users to trace their family heritage. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the ever-increasing role of DNA evidence — as well as the...

Duration:00:11:08

Why retail store 'no chase' policies are a dilemma for LE

5/17/2018
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A trend in retail sales is to instruct employees to not attempt to stop a shoplifter. Such “no pursuit” policies among retailers have implications for police. Principally, this turns a responding officer into little more than a report taker, not an enforcer of the law. Further, those same stores that refuse to prevent the loss of products to theft simultaneously demand that officers be more present in their neighborhoods to prevent criminal activity. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug...

Duration:00:11:51

Ordering food while in uniform

5/11/2018
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While attending ILEETA 2018 in Saint Louis in late March, I heard from multiple reliable sources that at least one nearby restaurant had something of a “sick out” among employees when they learned that the hotel next door was hosting some 800 of the most elite law enforcement trainers and educators in North America. Subsequently, service at the restaurant was impossibly slow. I didn’t experience this first hand, but enough people told the same story, so I tend to believe it. Some restaurants...

Duration:00:09:36

How Marsy’s law protects victims’ families

5/4/2018
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The year is 1983. A University of California Santa Barbara student named Marcy Nicholas is stalked by an ex-boyfriend and brutally murdered. A week after Marsy was murdered, her mother and brother are confronted by the accused murderer in a grocery store. They had no idea that he had been released on bail. Dr. Henry Nicholas — the key backer and proponent of Marsy’s Law — notes that criminals have more than 20 individual rights spelled out in the U.S. Constitution, while the surviving family...

Duration:00:09:32