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Where We Live

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Produced by Connecticut Public, 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. Host Catherine Shen brings us fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines. We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

Location:

United States

Description:

Produced by Connecticut Public, 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. Host Catherine Shen brings us fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines. We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

Twitter:

@wherewelive

Language:

English

Contact:

8602757481


Episodes
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"Flawless" Author Elise Hu dives into the world of K-Beauty

5/17/2024
In 2015, journalist Elise Hu moved to South Korea to open the NPR Seoul bureau. During her time in South Korea, she witnessed the rise of K-beauty culture or “Korean beauty.” K-beauty encompasses a multitude of beauty treatments. It doesn’t just include luxury skincare lines, and expensive facemasks; there's also LED light therapy, injections, fillers, and a myriad of options for plastic surgery. These procedures are becoming an increasingly normal part of daily life in South Korea, but also in the United States. They are also more accessible than ever to anyone that wants to change the way they look. Although some are starting to question the pursuit of keeping up with today’s beauty standards, this multibillion dollar beauty industry isn't going away. Today, Elise Hu joins us on Where We Live to talk about her book Flawless: Lessons in Looks and Culture from the K-Beauty Capital. We talk about the pursuit and pain of keeping up with today’s beauty standards. GUEST: Elise Hu: host of TED Talks Daily and also a host-at-large for NPR. She is the author of Flawless: Lessons in Looks and Culture from the K-Beauty Capital Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired September 19, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:30

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What it takes to save the turtles

5/16/2024
Turtles are among one of the oldest reptiles to walk the planet. Although turtles often live long lifespans and are among some of the most resilient animals on the planet, human presence has meant a huge threat to their species. In her new book Of Time and Turtles, Sy Montgomery says turtles live “slow.” She spent time working with the people who have dedicated their lives to rehabilitating these fascinating creatures, and she joins us to talk about her book. And Matt Patterson, fellow turtle lover, illustrator of this book and their accompanying picture book The Book of Turtles, joins us too. He is also a wildlife artist and sculptor. We'll learn about what’s being done to care for and protect these animals. GUESTS: Sy Montgomery: Author of Of Time and Turtles Matt Patterson: Illustrator of The Book of Turtles and wildlife artist Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired October 3, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:00

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Final episode of 'In Absentia,' plus a conversation on the future of Bridgeport politics

5/14/2024
Connecticut Public has spent the past year investigating political dysfunction, , allegations of absentee ballot misconduct, and machine politics in Bridgeport. The investigation has culminated in a four part series called “In Absentia.” Today, we hear the final episode of this podcast and speak to members of the Accountability Project, Connecticut Public’s investigative team. You can listen back to all the episodes on ctpublic.org/bpt or wherever you get your podcasts. GUESTS: Bria Lloyd: Investigative Reporter for the Accountability Project Jim Haddadin: Editor for The Accountability Project Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:30

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'Sounds of New Haven': NXTHVN exhibition examines the 'multi-local'

5/13/2024
Every year, a cohort of emerging artists and curators gather at NXTHVN, a fellowship program located in the heart of New Haven's Dixwell neighborhood, and "a new national arts model that empowers artists, curators, and the community through education and access to a vibrant ecosystem." This hour, we hear from Marquita Flowers and Clare Patrick, current curatorial fellows at NXTHVN. Their exhibition, "To Echo A Shadow," explores the links between industrialization and forced migration. We discuss how the Dixwell neighborhood, and its history, were embraced in the exhibition programming. Plus, former NXTHVN fellow Michelle Phuong Ho discusses what artist community means to her. She recently launched the literary salon "quietly wild." GUESTS: Marquita Flowers: Curatorial Fellow 2023-2024, NXTHVN Clare Patrick: Curatorial Fellow 2023-2024, NXTHVN Michelle Phuong Ho: Poet; Community Organizer; Former Curatorial Fellow, NXTHVN Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:59

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A look at efforts to improve accessible parking regulation in Connecticut

5/9/2024
Connecticut's Department of Motor Vehicles began phasing out permanent or "lifetime" disability parking placards in 2010, to help curb misuse. Some advocates and lawmakers are hoping more can be done to regulate how these passes are issued, and how misuse might be enforced. This hour, we hear from Alexandria Bode, who is behind the accessible parking-focused non-profit, Peace Love & ACCESSibility, along with her family members and fellow advocates, Sam Bode and Mary Caruso. House Republican Leader Vincent Candelora and Transportation Committee Co-Chair Senator Christine Cohen are their legislators, and both testified for SB 279 this session. The bill, which passed under a different name, requires that a person’s treating physician, PA or APRN certify the need for a pass, versus an online provider, for example. They also join us. The Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles formed the Accessible Parking Advisory Council last year. DMV Commissioner Tony Guerrera discusses the latest after the council's second meeting. East Haven Police Officer Joseph Murgo recently contributed to a PSA the Bodes' non-profit is producing. He also joins the conversation. GUESTS: Alexandra Bode: Peace, Love & ACCESSibilitySam Bode: Peace, Love & ACCESSibilityMary Caruso: Peace, Love & ACCESSibilityJoseph Murgo:Vincent Candelora: Christine Cohen: Tony Guerrera: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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Creating 'In Absentia': The podcast diving deep into Bridgeport's politics

5/7/2024
Connecticut Public has spent the past year investigating political dysfunction, allegations of absentee ballot misconduct, and machine politics in Bridgeport. The investigation has culminated in a four part series called “In Absentia.” Today, we hear episode 3 of this podcast and speak to members of The Accountability Project, Connecticut Public’s investigative team. You can listen to all the episodes of In Absentia on ctpublic.org/bpt or wherever you get your podcasts. GUESTS: Bria Lloyd: Investigative Reporter for the Accountability Project (below right) Jim Haddadin: Editor for The Accountability Project (below left) Untitled-1.jpg (3000x2000, AR: 1.5) Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:47:00

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Creating 'In Absentia': The podcast diving deep into Bridgeport's politics

5/7/2024
Connecticut Public has spent the past year investigating political dysfunction, allegations of absentee ballot misconduct, and machine politics in Bridgeport. The investigation has culminated in a four part series called “In Absentia.” Today, we hear episode 3 of this podcast and speak to members of The Accountability Project, Connecticut Public’s investigative team. You can listen to all the episodes of In Absentia on ctpublic.org/bpt or wherever you get your podcasts. GUESTS: Bria Lloyd: Investigative Reporter for the Accountability Project Jim Haddadin: Editor for The Accountability Project Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:47:00

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Taking a tour of the Vintage Radio and Communications Museum of Connecticut

5/6/2024
How do you listen to Connecticut Public or Where We Live? Your cell phone, car radio or something else? This hour, we explore the many ways information can travel, and the history of how these devices were made. Hear Where We Live host Catherine Shen take a tour of the Vintage Radio and Communications Museum of Connecticut with Charles "Skip" Coulson, John Ramos, Peter Knight and Jeff Gross, some of the museum's many volunteers. Plus, we hear from Lisa Kirk, one of the museum’s amateur radio operators or "hams." She discusses the museum's amateur radio club, and what it takes to become a ham. GUESTS: Lisa Kirk: Volunteer and ham radio operator at the Vintage Radio and Communications Museum in Windsor Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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Transracial adoptee Angela Tucker talks about centering adoption stories on adoptees

5/6/2024
Growing up as a transracial adoptee, Angela Tucker's friends, family, and even strangers would make comments and assumptions about what her life would have been like if she hadn’t been adopted. Angela Tucker is the author of the book "You Should Be Grateful": Stories of Race, Identity, and Transracial Adoption and she is Executive Director of the Adoptee Mentoring Society. Today, we talk about the intricacies of navigating life as a transracial adoptee. For years, adoption stories have been told from the point of view of the adoptive parents. Angela says it’s time to flip the script and let adoptees tell their stories. Later, we hear from an adoption agency and learn about the type of conversations they have with potential transracial adoptive parents. Check out the UConn Health Adoption Assurance Program to find more information about transracial adoption. GUESTS: Angela Tucker: Author of the book, "You Should Be Grateful": Stories of Race, Identity, and Transracial Adoption and Executive Director of the Adoptee Mentoring Society Laura Sullivan: Chief Program Officer at Just Choice, a pro-choice adoption agency Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired December 8, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:30

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Students participating at Pro-Palestine protests speak out

5/3/2024
Colleges are spaces for open dialogue, debate, and even protest. Student protesters have called for universities to divest from Israel. Today, we hear from students who have participated in encampments at Yale University and Wesleyan University. We also speak with Davarian Baldwin, author of Shadow of the Ivory Tower and professor at Trinity college to get a better understanding on what divestment means, and how it might impact the financial future of many universities. Wesleyan statement on campus protests Yale statement regarding campus statement GUESTS: Chisato Kimura: Law Student at Yale University Batya Kline: Student Organizer at Wesleyan University Davarian Baldwin: Founding director of the Smart Cities Lab at Trinity College; author, In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower: How Universities are Plundering Our Cities Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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Taking a 'holistic approach' to treating congenital heart disease

5/2/2024
Heart disease has been the leading cause of death in the United States for decades, putting much of the focus squarely and rightly on cardiovascular disease. But what about congenital heart conditions, something affecting your heart since birth? There are 13 million adults living with congenital heart disease, and that number has grown as treatments advance; survival rates have improved by 75% since the 1940s. But those diagnoses can come later in life, and even with sure signs, the need for specialized, lifelong care is often unmet. This hour, we're joined by the co-authors of Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease. Plus, we hear from one of 50 clinics accredited by the Adult Congenital Heart Association in the U.S., right here in Connecticut. GUESTS: Tracy Livecchi: Social Worker; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease Dr. Liza Morton: Psychologist; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds Dr. Robert Elder: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and Internal Medicine (Cardiology); Director, Adult Congenital Heart Program; Director Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program, Pediatric Cardiology Cat Pastor contributed to this program which originally aired October 11. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:39:30

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The four-day work week might be here sooner than you think

4/30/2024
More workers than ever are working a hybrid work schedule - part time in the office and part time at home. According to a Gallup Poll, nearly 40% of hybrid workers can set their own schedule. Yet burnout feels more apparent than ever before. Many offices are searching to find solutions to provide better work-life balance including the four day work week. Today, we revisit this topic and explore others that claim to give employees more of their time back. And we want to hear from you. What’s your schedule like in the office these days? Would you rather work a four day week? GUESTS: Alex Soojung-Kim Pang:4-Day Week GlobalLynne C Vincent: Robert C. Bird: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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Artist Pablo Delano's 'Museum of the Old Colony' lands at Venice Biennale

4/29/2024
The Venice Biennale is the art world's most prestigious exhibition. It’s sometimes even called the "Olympics of Art," held annually in Italy. Right now, Pablo Delano, a Puerto Rico-born, Hartford-based artist, has an installation called “The Museum of the Old Colony” located in its central pavilion. The installation collection is comprised largely of photographs and artifacts, all of which raise questions around America’s relationship with Puerto Rico, and the island's status as the world’s oldest colony. The “museum” also raises questions about the politics and institution of museums. This hour, we hear from Delano. Plus, Faisal Saleh with Palestine Museum US in Woodbridge discusses their unofficial collateral exhibit in Venice, "Foreigners without a Homeland," featuring 27 artists. 1 of 4An exhibit named “Foreigners in Their Homeland,” proposed by the Palestine Museum U.S., was not included in the 60th Venice Biennale. It is now an unofficial collateral event at Venice’s Palazzo Mora opening April 20.Provided / Faisal Saleh2 of 4An exhibit named “Foreigners in Their Homeland,” proposed by the Palestine Museum U.S., was not included in the 60th Venice Biennale. It is now an unofficial collateral event at Venice’s Palazzo Mora opening April 20.Provided / Faisal Saleh3 of 4An exhibit named “Foreigners in Their Homeland,” proposed by the Palestine Museum U.S., was not included in the 60th Venice Biennale. It is now an unofficial collateral event at Venice’s Palazzo Mora opening April 20.Provided / Faisal Saleh4 of 4An exhibit named “Foreigners in Their Homeland,” proposed by the Palestine Museum U.S., was not included in the 60th Venice Biennale. It is now an unofficial collateral event at Venice’s Palazzo Mora opening April 20.Provided / Faisal Saleh GUESTS: Pablo Delano: Faisal Saleh: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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This year, we're gardening with climate change in mind

4/26/2024
For this gardening hour, we’re talking about ecological gardening and gardening for the environment. We’ll be touching on planting natives, using rain barrels, preparing your compost pile and more. We’ll also learn what plants can make your garden a pollinator oasis. And we want to hear from you: what are you planting this year? GUESTS: Charlie Nardozzi:Dawn Pettinelli: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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'Not hopeless or helpless': How children's book authors take on climate change

4/25/2024
You’re never too young to learn about climate change. Younger Americans are more likely to engage with the issue, according to research on Gen Z and Millennials from Pew. This hour, we hear from the authors of three children’s books about climate change, and taking action, including UConn sociologist Dr. Phoebe Godfrey, meteorologist Paul Douglas, environmental scientist Lena Champlin, and resident in psychiatry Jeremy Wortzel. GUESTS: Dr. Phoebe Godfrey: Dr. Jeremy Wortzel: Coco’s Fire: Changing Climate Anxiety Into Climate ActionDr. Lena Champlin: Coco’s Fire: Changing Climate Anxiety Into Climate ActionPaul Douglas:A Kid's Guide to Saving the Planet: It's not Hopeless and We're Not Helpless Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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This Earth Week, addressing climate change where we live

4/23/2024
This week, reporters from the New England News Collaborative are recognizing Earth Day and focusing their reporting on the intersection of climate change and housing. 34% of the housing stock across New England is rented. Many solutions to making homes more climate friendly are mostly geared toward homeowners. But investing in energy efficient appliances and installing solar panels isn’t that feasible for renters. We learn what you can do to make your home more energy efficient as a renter. Most homes are built with a few central materials: mainly steel and concrete. But as new buildings are constructed from homes to office spaces, a new material has been introduced to make buildings stronger, more energy efficient and more sustainable: wood. We learn more. And later, we hear how one organization is working to create more green spaces in New Haven. To learn more about the NENC and view more of their Earth Week reporting visit: https://www.nenc.news/earth-week GUESTS: Abigail Brone: Housing Reporter at Connecticut Public Jonathón Savage: Executive Director of Gather New Haven Abagael Giles: Climate and Environment Reporter at Vermont Public Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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How new federal limits on 'forever chemicals' will affect Connecticut

4/22/2024
The Environmental Protection Agency has finalized the first-ever federal limits on a class of chemicalled known as PFAS, or "forever chemicals," in drinking water. This hour, we discuss what these enforceable limits mean for how Connecticut monitors and regulates PFAS. Department of Public Health Commissioner Manisha Juthani joins us, plus Connecticut Mirror investigative reporter Andrew Brown. Plus, Attorney General William Tong touches on the lawsuits he filed against chemical manufacturers of PFAS. GUESTS: William Tong: Connecticut Attorney General Dr. Manisha Juthani: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health Andrew Brown: Investigative Reporter, Connecticut Mirror Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

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Fewer Americans are considering careers in the military and branches are looking for solutions to recruiting

4/19/2024
During the last fiscal year, the army alone missed their recruiting goal by 25%. All branches of the military are struggling to recruit new cadets. With an all-volunteer service, the military relies on recruitment efforts to get more people to serve. But fewer Americans than ever are eligible to do so. And attracting the next generation of cadets has been a challenge. Today, we talk about the military recruiting crisis. We will hear from Captain Benjamin Keffer, Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command. Later, we hear how some extremist groups are working to get veterans and others with tactical experience into their organizations. GUESTS: Dr. Nora Bensahel: Professor of the Practice at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a Contributing Editor, War on the Rocks Captain Benjamin Keffer: Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command Sonner Kehrt: Investigative Reporter at the War Horse and Coast Guard Veteran Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired on October 6, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:41:00

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'We need a moonshot for long COVID': What we know (and don't know) about the illness

4/18/2024
Nearly one in four adults who contracted COVID-19 have developed long COVID symptoms, according to the latest Census report. This hour, Dr. Akiko Iwasaki, an immunobiology expert at Yale who is focused on researching long COVID, joins us to share what we know and don't know about the illness, and the many ways it can manifest. The Patient-Led Research Collaborative has authored several seminal surveys and studies. We also hear from co-founder Lisa McCorkell about this bank of patient-led research. She says, "We need a moonshot for long COVID: at least a billion dollars a year in research funding to adequately address this crisis." Plus, Yale American Studies professor Dr. Daniel HoSang has written about the “twin pandemics” of COVID-19 and racism. He joins us to reflect on the four-year mark of the virus, and the links he sees to the long COVID response. GUESTS: Dr. Daniel HoSang: Professor of American Studies, Yale University; Co-Author, Under the Blacklight: The Intersectional Vulnerabilities that the Twin Pandemics Lay Bare Dr. Akiko Iwasaki: Co-Lead Investigator, Yale COVID-19 Recovery Study; Sterling Professor of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Lisa McCorkell: Co-Founder, Patient-Led Research Collaborative Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:41:13

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A conversation with the new head of the Archdiocese of Hartford

4/16/2024
Although church attendance has dwindled across all faiths, 39% of Catholics say they attend services at least once a week. The Archdiocese of Hartford includes over 400,000 Catholics across the state of Connecticut, and is now being overseen by a new Archbishop. After years of service, Archbishop Leonard Paul Blair will be succeeded by the newly appointedCoadjutor Archbishop Christopher Coyne, who recently served as a Bishop in Burlington, Vermont. Today, we talk about the future of the Catholic Church, serving the Catholic population in Connecticut and a recent document published by the Vatican and its statements on gender identity and gender affirming surgery, surrogacy, and human dignity. GUESTS: Coadjutor Archbishop Christopher Coyne: Joshua McElwee: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:39:53