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The Science of Happiness

PRI

Learn research-tested strategies for a happier, more meaningful life, drawing on the science of compassion, gratitude, mindfulness, and awe. Hosted by award-winning psychologist Dacher Keltner. Co-produced by PRX and UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

Location:

United States

Networks:

PRI

Description:

Learn research-tested strategies for a happier, more meaningful life, drawing on the science of compassion, gratitude, mindfulness, and awe. Hosted by award-winning psychologist Dacher Keltner. Co-produced by PRX and UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

Language:

English


Episodes
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How To Unwind By Doing Mindful Yard Work

6/20/2024
Everyday activities, such as cleaning and gardening, can be sources of joy and opportunities for mindfulness. This week, our guest shares his experience practicing mindful sweeping on the temple stairs in Kyoto, Japan with Shoukei Matsumoto, a Buddhist monk. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/3r6ju2wh The Science of Happiness is now Instagram, and we'd love for you to follow us! You can find us at @ScienceofHappinessPod. We're going to go behind the scenes of our episodes, and share how to do the practices we talk about on the show. The first 100 followers will be included in a raffle to win a signed copy of host Dacher Keltner's newest book, Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life. Episode summary: Many of us see yard work as a chore. But what if we shift our perspective and instead see it as an opportunity to practice mindfulness? This week on The Science of Happiness, our guest shares his experience of sweeping the steps of a Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan, and the mindfulness and mental processes involved in the practice. Then, we hear from Shoukei Matsumoto, a Buddhist monk and author, about the practice of cleaning as a form of mindfulness. Practice: The next time you’re tending to your garden, picking up trash on your sidewalk, watering the plants, or doing other chores, spend a few minutes practicing mindfulness by slowing down and really being present with the activity and your own body's movements while you do it. Today’s guests: Matt Heron is a Canadian who has been living and working in Japan for five years. Shoukei Matsumoto is a Buddhist monk and cleaning enthusiast in Kyoto, Japan. He is the author of “A Monk’s Guide to a Clean House and Mind,” which has been translated into 18 languages, including English https://www.interbeing.co.jp/enMore episodes like this one: How to Make Work More Satisfying: https://tinyurl.com/3fa925yf Why We Should Seek Beauty in the Everyday Life: https://tinyurl.com/26dskv38 Related Happiness Breaks (a short, guided practice by The Science of Happiness) Contemplating Our Interdependence With Nature, With Dekila Chungyalpa: https://tinyurl.com/erz2f5de Happiness Break: How to Be in Harmony in Nature—Wherever You Are, With Yuria Celidwen: https://tinyurl.com/ynxeeb7a Tell us about your mindful gardening experiences! Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. This episode is sponsored by Tianren Culture, whose vision is “One Health, One Wellness.” Tianren Culture is a next-generation social platform that acts as a catalyst to foster positive global values and lifestyles. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap

Duration:00:23:01

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Happiness Break: How to Relax Your Body Through A Standing Meditation, With Sherry Zhang

6/13/2024
Last week on The Science of Happiness, we discussed the scientifically proven health benefits of the ancient Chinese practice of qigong with Harvard psychologist Peter Wayne. This week, we practice a standing meditation, with qigong master Sherry Zhang. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/3t5wdexe How to Do This Practice: Today’s Happiness Break host: Sherry Zhang is the founder of Tai Chi Solutions and a Master Teacher of Qigong. She is faculty at Pacific College of Health and Sciences in New York City. https://www.taichisolution.org/https://www.instagram.com/taichisolution/https://tinyurl.com/ywca6nd5https://www.facebook.com/sherrytaichi/https://www.facebook.com/taichisolution/If you enjoyed this Happiness Break, you may also like these ones: Walk Your Way to Calm (Guided Meditation), with Dacher: https://tinyurl.com/4w37zwpy A Walking Meditation With Dan Harris of 10% Happier: https://tinyurl.com/4dv4ckzc Check out these episodes of The Science of Happiness about movement-based practices: How Qigong Can Calm Your Mind and Body: https://tinyurl.com/2ywsck4e Episode 5: Walk Outside with Inside Out’s Pete Docter: https://tinyurl.com/2nfc94zb We love hearing from you! Tell us what movement based practice you’ve tried! Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Share this Happiness Break!

Duration:00:05:44

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How Qigong Can Calm Your Mind and Body

6/6/2024
Studies show qigong can strengthen your body and mind, and reduce cortisol levels. We explore this Chinese meditative movement practice that dates back over 4,000 years. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/2ywsck4e Episode summary: Finding calm in your day to day life can be stressful, especially in a world that seems to be moving at such a rapid pace. Your life can change in an instant– and it can be really difficult to get yourself on your feet again. On this episode of The Science of Happiness, Ace Boral, an Oakland-based chef, joins us to try Qigong. Ace talks about his health struggles over the past four years, and how incorporating Qigong into his life over the past few weeks has helped him find mental clarity, emotional balance, and confidence in himself. Then we hear from Harvard psychologist Peter Wayne who has practiced and studied the benefits of Xigong. Today’s guests: Ace Boral is an Oakland-based chef. Peter Wayne is an Associate Professor of Medicine, and serves as the Director for the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, jointly based at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. More episodes like this one: https://tinyurl.com/3u844n4dTell us about your experiences with Qigong. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap

Duration:00:22:37

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Happiness Break: A Meditation on How To Be Your Best Self, with Justin Michael Williams

5/30/2024
Here's a favorite of ours: visualize your best possible self and tap into your inherent enough-ness with this guided meditation by Justin Michael Williams. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/ytakaaep How to Do This Practice: Today’s Happiness Break host: Justin Michael Williams works at the intersection of social justice, mindfulness, and personal growth — with a touch of music that brings it all to life. https://www.justinmichaelwilliams.com/https://www.justinmichaelwilliams.com/musicStay Woke: A Meditation Guide For the Rest of Ushttps://twitter.com/wejustwillhttps://www.instagram.com/wejustwill/More episodes like this one How to Find Your Best Possible Self https://tinyurl.com/6t3uws8d Happiness Break: Visualizing Your Best Self in Relationships, With Dacher Keltner https://tinyurl.com/5cx6cd5z Happiness Break: Visualizing Your Purpose, With Dacher https://tinyurl.com/39apt7tb We love hearing from you! Tell us what brings you feelings of awe. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break!

Duration:00:07:47

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Encore: Why We Need Friends With Shared Interests

5/23/2024
She's the world's leading animal behaviorist and an autism advocacy leader. Guest Temple Grandin shares what kind of support systems led her to success, and we hear about how community, and lack thereof, affects our health and ability to succeed. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/y82vw4dv Episode summary: Having strong relationships is vital to our well-being. We tend to be happier and healthier when we’re involved with community. Today’s guest is the world-famous scientist Temple Grandin. She was born with autism, which led her to be socially isolated from her peers. Join us on this episode of The Science of Happiness to hear about how Grandin credits her support networks for her success and making her into the person she is today. We’ll also look at the science behind the health repercussions of not having strong social networks. Feeling socially disconnected can lead to a higher risk of dementia, cardiovascular disease, cancer and more. Today’s guests: Temple Grandin is a leading scientist, prominent author and speaker on autism and animal behaviors. Today, she teaches courses at Colorado State University. Her latest book is Visual Thinking: The Hidden Gifts of People Who Think in Pictures, Patterns, and Abstractions. Temple’s Website: https://www.templegrandin.com Follow Temple on Twitter: https://twitter.com/drtemplegrandin?lang=en Check out Temple’s Latest Book: https://tinyurl.com/3tftxpck Tegan Cruwyis is a clinical psychologist at The National Australian University who studies social connection and how loneliness and chronic isolation are literally toxic. Learn more about Cruwyis and her work: https://tinyurl.com/3etuvket Follow Cruwyis on Google Scholar: https://tinyurl.com/yc5ujhaj Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Four Ways Social Support Makes You More Resilient https://tinyurl.com/34ntce8u What is Social Connection? https://tinyurl.com/nk8crbbz Is Social Connection the Best Path to Happiness? https://tinyurl.com/4wxc66tn Why are We so Wired to Connect? https://tinyurl.com/uttppd3p Tell us about your experiences with building social connections. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Transcript to come.

Duration:00:17:20

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Happiness Break: A Meditation on Cultivating Awe Through Colors

5/16/2024
Experiencing awe can help us slow down and connect to the world around us. So how can we harness the power of this feeling? Host Dacher Keltner leads us in a colorful meditation to bring about awe. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/3e9cyky5 Practice: Today’s guests: Dacher Keltner is the host of the Greater Good Science Center’s award-winning podcast, The Science of Happiness and is a co-instructor of the GGSC’s popular online course of the same name. He’s also the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. More episodes like this one: How Awe Brings Us Together https://tinyurl.com/bdhy4sj5 How Music Evokes Awe https://tinyurl.com/mpkww4j9 Happiness Break: Awe for Others, With Dacher https://tinyurl.com/3ptwh66j Feeling the Awe of Nature from Anywhere, with Dacher Keltner https://tinyurl.com/4r7rjaxf We love hearing from you! Tell us what brings you feelings of awe. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Rate us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus

Duration:00:06:21

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How Birdsong Can Help Your Mental Health

5/9/2024
Hearing birdsong can help us feel less anxious, recover from stress faster, and even reduce muscle tension ... but can it help us fall asleep? Drew Ackerman of Sleep With Me podcast listens to recordings of birdsongs to see if it'll help with insomnia. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/5n7sxjtb Episode summary: Drew Ackerman, aka Scooter of Sleep With Me Podcast, has always struggled to get to sleep. Even as an anxious kid, worries would keep his mind churning as the night wore on. For our show, he tried a science-backed practice for easing stress: listening to the twitter of birds. He discovered the recordings reminded him of easeful summer afternoons, transporting him to another time and place. The research bears this out: different sounds affect us in different ways. For many, birdsong lowers our body’s stress responses. And for Drew, that helped him get a little sleepier. Practice: Listen to a recording of birdsong that appeals to you. Today’s guests: Drew Ackerman You might know Drew as his alias, “Dearest Scooter,” the host of Sleep with Me podcast. Drew struggles with bedtime worries and has a history of insomnia himself, but he’s great at helping others sleep. Sleep with Me is one of the most listened-to sleep podcasts. On each episode, “Scooter” lulls listeners off to dreamland with meandering bedtime stories intended to lose your interest. Listen to Sleep With Me Podcast: https://pod.link/sleep-with-me Follow Drew on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/2p8nrhnp Follow Drew on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dearestscooter/ Follow Drew on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Sleepwithmepodcast/ Emil Stobbe is a post-doctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Germany. Jesper Alvarsson is a professor of Psychology at Södertörn University in Sweden. Eleanor Ratcliffe is a professor of Environmental Psychology at the University of Surrey in the UK. More episodes like this one: The Science of a Good Night's Sleep (Sleep Tips, With Drew Ackerman) - https://tinyurl.com/3wrwzrxy Why You Should Snap Pictures of Nature (Appreciating The Outdoors, With Tejal Rao) - https://tinyurl.com/erwdvwrw Related Happiness Breaks (a short, guided practice by The Science of Happiness) Restore Through Silence, With Tricia Hersey - https://tinyurl.com/4h8ww8ub Feeling the Awe of Nature from Anywhere, With Dacher Keltner - https://tinyurl.com/43v74ryn Tell us what sounds relax you! You can even send us a recording, we’d love to hear it. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap

Duration:00:18:33

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Happiness Break: A Meditation on Pilina: Our Deep Interconnectedness, With Jo Qina'au

5/2/2024
Pilina is an indigenous Hawaiian word, or concept, that describes our deep interconnectedness. Harvard Clinical Psychology Fellow Jo Qina'au guides us through a contemplation of our profound interrelationships. Link to Episode Transcript: https://shorturl.at/npAM9 How to Do This Practice: Pilina comes from the indigenous Hawaiian language and culture. Pilina means connection, or interconnectedness. Settle into a comfortable position and observe your breath. Visualize someone to whom you feel meaningfully connected and acknowledge the feeling of Pilina, or deep interconnectedness, between you two. Reflect on what it is that connects you, what impact that connection has had on your life, and what it may have had on theirs. Notice how it feels to acknowledge these things. Repeat steps 2-4 with as many people as you wish. Today’s Happiness Break host: Jo Qina’au is an indigenous Hawaiian meditation teacher and a Clinical Psychology Fellow at Harvard Medical School. Learn more about Jo’s work: https://tinyurl.com/2wfcma5f Follow Jo on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/3v8ubn6a If you enjoyed this Happiness Break, you may also like these Happiness Breaks: 5 Minutes of Progressive Muscle Relaxation, With Jo Qina’au - https://tinyurl.com/4f3fd97f Visualizing Your Best Self in Relationships, With Dacher Keltner - https://tinyurl.com/4dzpatx7 Check out these episodes of The Science of Happiness about connection: How to Feel Less Lonely and More Connected - https://tinyurl.com/36t6urte When It's Hard To Connect, Try Being Curious - https://tinyurl.com/3778r4h9 We love hearing from you! Tell us who you feel Pilina with, and what it means to you to reflect on it. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.

Duration:00:10:09

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Are You Remembering The Good Times?

4/25/2024
Thinking about happy memories activates reward centers in our brains, and can help us feel more connected and accepted. Palestinian-American poet Naomi Shihab Nye discovers the joy-bringing power of recalling her good childhood memories. Link to Transcript: https://tinyurl.com/2r63e6tn Episode summary: Whether it’s news notifications or work emails, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the stresses of our time every moment of every day. But what if there was something we could do to rekindle the greatest joys of our pasts? How might that shift how we feel in the present moment? Simply reflecting on happy memories has been shown in a lab to reduce stress, activate the reward center in our brain, and uplift our mood. This week, Palestinian-American poet and author Naomi Shihab Nye reminisces on happy memories from her youth and finds the practice soothes her and sparks joyfulness. We also hear from neuroscientist Mauricio Delgado about how the practice changes the way we think and feel, and which types of happy memories serve us best. Practice: For one week or more, spend 5-10 minutes each day writing in response to the following prompt: Think about good memories you have from your past. Write a few paragraphs describing them and one event that you still remember to this date. Please provide as many details as possible, including who was there, so that another person reading what you wrote could understand how you felt at that time. Today’s guests: Naomi Shihab Nye is a Palestinian-American poet and author. Her new book of poetry, Grace Notes, will be available May 7. Order Grace Notes: https://tinyurl.com/st3w6n8t Check out Naomi’s children’s book about a child visiting her Palestinian grandmother, Sitti’s Secrets: https://tinyurl.com/5embjxuj Follow Naomi on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/5hddcf8k Mauricio Delgado is a psychology professor at Rutgers University who studies social and cognitive neuroscience. Learn more about Mauricio’s work: https://tinyurl.com/4tt7bp2d Follow Mauricio on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/27kvv6j7 More episodes like this one: Why We Should Look Up at the Sky - https://tinyurl.com/4xs88sye Why We Need Friends with Shared Interests - https://tinyurl.com/bdesh3he Related Happiness Breaks: A Meditation to Connect to Your Roots, With Yuria Celidwen - https://tinyurl.com/3ae3w3z3 Where Did You Come From? Guided Writing, With Lyla June - https://tinyurl.com/ytypxn5t Tell us about your happiest childhood memories, and what they bring to you now. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap

Duration:00:19:42

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Happiness Break: A Walking Meditation with Dan Harris of 10% Happier

4/18/2024
A walking meditation led by 10% Happier Host Dan Harris How to Do This Practice: Transcript: https://tinyurl.com/yc2kpzmy Today’s Happiness Break host: Dan Harris the host of 10% Happier, a podcast about mindfulness and other practices and thoughts that can support our well-being. Check out Dan’s podcast, 10% Happier: https://tinyurl.com/48cxcbjm\ Order his most recent book, Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics: A 10% Happier How-to Book: https://tinyurl.com/44cmjuvd Follow Dan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/danbharris Follow Dan on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/danharris/ If you enjoyed this Happiness Break, you may also like: Moving Through Space, With Dacher Keltner - https://tinyurl.com/5n8dj5v6 Check out these episodes of The Science of Happiness about walking and mind-body awareness. How To Do Good For The Environment (And Yourself) (Walking, With Diana Gameros) - https://tinyurl.com/3zfhhpus How To Focus Under Pressure (Mindful Body Scan, With Amy Schneider) - https://tinyurl.com/5fkdre2v We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experiences with mindful walking. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus

Duration:00:07:00

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How To Make Work More Satisfying

4/11/2024
Finding ways to bend tasks toward your strengths and passions can make you happier, more productive and find more meaning in your life — no matter your job. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/4ky325rs Episode summary: When the poet and former professor Susan Glass first retired, she stacked her days with so many volunteer gigs and passion projects, she felt like she was working harder than ever before. Now, she wants to prioritize living a life of meaning and enjoyment. Susan tried a lab-tested practice called Job Crafting, where you take stock of the tasks that fill your day, how much time and energy they require, what really lights you up, and what changes you can make to better align your efforts at work (or in your free time) with your genuine strengths and passions. Then we hear from researcher Maria Tims about how Job Crafting doesn’t just benefit your own well-being and help to guard against burnout, it can also boost your whole team’s productivity and morale. Practice: Create a “before” sketch: List all your regular tasks, and note each one as low, medium, or high in terms of the time and energy you actually devote to them. Reflect on and write down what motivates you, what your strengths are, and what you’re passionate about. Create a more ideal (but still realistic) "after" diagram, shifting draining tasks from “high” to “low” or “medium” if possible, and boosting energizing and enjoyable tasks where you can. Create an action plan: What are some concrete changes that are in your power to make? Are there places where you need to ask for the support of a colleague or supervisor to make a change? Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/job_crafting Today’s guests: Susan Glass is a retired English professor and visually impaired, Bay Area-based poet. She’s the author of the poetry book “The Wild Language of Deer.” Read Susan’s book: https://pod.link/sleep-with-me Learn more about Susan’s life and work: https://tinyurl.com/j3pcjn6r Maria Tims is a professor of Management and Organization at the University of Amsterdam School of Business and Economics. Learn more about her work: https://tinyurl.com/mtp7tpy3 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Make Life More Meaningful (The Science of Happiness Podcast) https://tinyurl.com/39pth57f How to Be More Engaged at Work: https://tinyurl.com/2s3t5x2c How Oxytocin Can Make Your Job More Meaningful: https://tinyurl.com/mrx8458h Four Keys to a Healthy Workplace Hierarchy: https://tinyurl.com/788m6tme More Resources for Improving the Job You Have: HBR - What Job Crafting Looks Like: https://tinyurl.com/453yamac LSE - Can workers really craft their own happiness in the job? https://tinyurl.com/yjavhda9 TED - The Power of Personalising Our Work: https://tinyurl.com/4cvznn8v Tell us about your experiences finding meaning in your day-to-day tasks. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap

Duration:00:16:22

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Happiness Break: A Meditation To Move Through Anger, With Eve Ekman

4/4/2024
Accepting difficult feelings like anger or irritation can help us keep our cool, feel better overall, and find calm on the other side. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/n6hm5yhz How to Do This Practice: Begin the practice by settling your mind and body. Notice your breath and any sensations that arise in your body, Shift your attention away from your body, recalling an instance where you felt mildly irritated or frustrated. Give yourself a few moments to fully feel this emotion. Notice any physical sensations that arise. Then, release that memory, refocusing your attention on the body. Allow these sensations to shift and move, giving them the space to change and observing them with a sense of curiosity and kindness. Consider shaking hands with the emotion the next time it arises in your daily life. Today’s Happiness Break host: Eve Ekman is a contemplative social scientist and meditation teacher from San Francisco, California. Learn more about Eve’s work: https://tinyurl.com/2vhuarh8 Find out about Eve’s Emotional trainings with Cultivating Emotional Balance: https://tinyurl.com/5n95m7yx Explore Eve’s Project, The Atlas of Emotions: https://tinyurl.com/mt75ytm3 Follow Eve on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/3txahape More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Regulate Your Emotions Without Suppressing Them: https://tinyurl.com/4x29denx What to Do When You Feel Stuck in Negative Emotions: https://tinyurl.com/mwczxfya How to Turn Your Brain from Anger to Compassion: https://tinyurl.com/57upkcfa How to Overcome Destructive Anger: https://tinyurl.com/49zu6whw We love hearing from you! How do you manage your emotions? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.

Duration:00:07:25

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How To Talk To People You Disagree With

3/28/2024
We learn techniques for working across the aisle without compromising our values from a Democratic politician in one of the most conservative states, Oklahoma. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/w2a9a42p Episode summary: Trying to have a conversation with someone who has an opposing view can be exhausting. This week, we explore what it means to have productive discussions when we disagree. Democratic Oklahoma State Senator Jo Anna Dossett recounts her experience bridging political divides with Republican senators in her state with active listening and self-compassion. Later, we hear from political science professor Lilliana Mason about the blurred line between personal and political identities, and how connecting with individuals on an emotional and social level can lead to more fruitful discussions than just focusing on facts. Today’s guests: Jo Anna Dossett is an Oklahoma State Senator. Learn about Jo Anna Dossett: https://tinyurl.com/muxw7yvz Follow Jo Anna Dossett on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dossett4ok Follow Jo Anna Dossett on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/293n98fc Follow Jo Anna Dossett on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/yc3mszhx Lilliana Mason is a political science professor at Johns Hopkins University. Learn about Lilliana Mason’s work: https://tinyurl.com/w2hy6fhk Follow Lilliana Mason on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/29sumyxb Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Eight Keys to Bridging Our Differences: https://tinyurl.com/45ntehyp Four Lessons From Mediators for Bridging Differences: https://tinyurl.com/bdhf68te What Will It Take to Bridge Our Differences? https://tinyurl.com/3sua8uz5 Six Techniques to Help You Bridge Differences: https://tinyurl.com/ypsbycf4 15 Practices to Help Kids Bridge Differences: https://tinyurl.com/mvw4s649 More Resources on Bridging Differences TIME - How Americans Can Tackle Political Division Together: https://tinyurl.com/3phj6y7j APA - Healing the political divide: https://tinyurl.com/38kzvm5k BBC - Crossing Divides: What the research tells us: https://tinyurl.com/yahmwdth Stanford - How to Bridge Political Divides: https://tinyurl.com/yc7ha55p Tell us about your experiences and struggles bridging differences. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/d3mc7e6t

Duration:00:17:15

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Happiness Break: Tap into the Joy that Surrounds You, With Anushka Fernandopulle

3/21/2024
Beyond just feeling good, studies show experiencing other people's joy makes us more compassionate and satisfied with life. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/kycnk4ca How to Do This Practice: Today’s Happiness Break host: Anushka Fernandopulle is a Buddhist meditation teacher and leadership coach. Learn More about Anushka: https://www.anushkaf.org/about/ Follow Anushka on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anushka_dharma/ Follow Anushka on Twitter: https://twitter.com/anushkaf More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: Wishing Others’ Well, With Anushka Fernandopulle: https://tinyurl.com/jrkewjs8 What Is Sympathetic Joy and How Can You Feel More of It? https://tinyurl.com/yuzmykct How to Overcome Stress by Seeing Other People’s Joy: https://tinyurl.com/4csukyd5 Can Little Steps Lead to Big Joy? https://tinyurl.com/3e5yt3hp Why Experiencing Joy and Pain in a Group Is So Powerful: https://tinyurl.com/3trjtzfm We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of appreciating others’ joy. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/3bj4637f Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.

Duration:00:04:55

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Who’s Always There for You?

3/14/2024
When we remember the times someone had our back, it changes the way we view ourselves and the world. Our guest explores what happens when trying a practice to feel more supported. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/yc2kpzmy Episode summary: Ever since he was a young child, José Valladares has spent his life caring for others and has taken pride in supporting his family and community, For our show, he tried a practice where he recalled people in his life who he can turn to during a difficult moment — the people who support him. As he wrote about their admirable qualities and specific instances where they helped him, José felt a renewed sense of gratitude and energy to persist forward in helping others. Later, we hear from psychologist Angela Rowe about how feeling supported can impact our relationships and sense of personal empowerment. Practice: Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/feeling_supported Today’s guests: José Valladares is a software engineer in Utah originally from Honduras. Angela Rowe is a psychology professor at the University of Bristol. Learn more about Angela’s work: https://tinyurl.com/4nh752ad Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: Who Takes Care of You? With Dacher Keltner: https://tinyurl.com/bdezwwyd How to Let Someone Love You (The Science of Happiness Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/5xtzbzj2 Four Ways Social Support Makes You More Resilient: https://tinyurl.com/2p9zkjpj Just One Thing: Feel the Support: https://tinyurl.com/yrfnmwfv Friend or Family? https://tinyurl.com/msbs2kuh More Resources on Feeling Supported NYT Times - Are You Anxious, Avoidant or Secure? https://tinyurl.com/yes746sv The Atlantic - The Trait That ‘Super Friends’ Have in Common: https://tinyurl.com/bdheumdh BBC - Why friendship makes us healthier: https://tinyurl.com/3596n4u7 TED - How to ask for help -- and get a "yes": https://tinyurl.com/2ybrmt7m Stanford - Asking for help is hard, but people want to help more than we realize, Stanford scholar says’: https://tinyurl.com/4n4hraj5' Who do you turn to for support in your life? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/b6779syt

Duration:00:16:40

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Happiness Break: Where Did You Come From? Guided Writing With Lyla June

3/7/2024
Indigenous artist Lyla June leads a 5-minute freewriting exercise about our personal journeys. Autobiographical writing has been shown to help do better in relationships and feel more satisfied in life. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/3622n5s6 How to Do This Practice: You will need writing utensils for this practice. Find a comfortable place to start this writing practice, taking a few moments to ground yourself. Write the prompt, “I come from a place where…” For the next 5 minutes (or more), write whatever comes to mind, allowing your thoughts and ideas to flow freely, without judgment or filters. Trying keeping your pen to the paper the whole time. Take some time afterward to read and reflect on what you wrote. Consider repeating this exercise every few weeks or months to reflect on your past and prospective future. Today’s Happiness Break host: Lyla June is an Indigenous artist and scholar from the Diné Nation. Learn about Lyla June’s work: [https://www.lylajune.com/>\ Watch Lyla June’s videos: [https://tinyurl.com/bdhbwyru>\ Follow Lyla June on Twitter: [https://tinyurl.com/4pj565d6>\ Follow Lyla June on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/4pj565d6 More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: The Power of Expressing Your Deepest Emotions (The Science of Happiness Podcast): [https://tinyurl.com/2uzh3r67>\ How to Journal Through Your Struggles: [https://tinyurl.com/yua6wkwd>\ How Journaling Can Help You in Hard Times: [https://tinyurl.com/3zv3hunw>\ How Creative Writing Can Increase Students’ Resilience: https://tinyurl.com/4xw8xuff How was your experience with this freewriting exercise? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/ycukc4za Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.

Duration:00:09:27

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Why Grownups Should Be Playful Too

2/29/2024
Playfulness can improve your relationships, help you excel at work, and reduce stress. We explore a strategy shown to help you become more playful. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/b5xc78r3 Episode summary: Patricia Mebrahtu used to have so much fun as a child. Now, as a medical assistant and mother of two young children, she found herself feeling burnt out and irritable. For our show, Patricia tried a practice to infuse more playfulness into her life. From singing karaoke with her family to playing in the rain, she tapped into her inner child. Through this practice, Patricia recognized the importance of taking time out for yourself, and that she can carve out opportunities to have fun and be playful, even as a busy adult. Later, we hear from psychologist René Proyer about the different types of playfulness, and how incorporating play can benefit our sense of wellbeing. Practice: Each day for a week, incorporate one playful activity into your routine – it can be anything you find enjoyable and playful. Every evening, write about the experience, and how it made you feel in the present moment. Today’s guests: Patricia Mebrahtu is a mother and medical assistant in California. René Proyer is a psychologist from the Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. Learn about René’s work: http://tinyurl.com/4sa9vye9 Follow René on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/3x5986u6 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Can We Play? http://tinyurl.com/prhv22rf What Playfulness Can Do for Your Relationship: http://tinyurl.com/n9b3h7e4 Tuesday Tip: Play with Some Friends: http://tinyurl.com/mu837nwr More Resources on Being Playful: BBC - Playtime: Is it time we took 'play' more seriously? http://tinyurl.com/4jmx89vn NYT - Why We All Need to Have More Fun: http://tinyurl.com/335z4bdu Washington Post - Why it’s good for grown-ups to go play: http://tinyurl.com/5w8shen TED - The Importance of PLAY in adulthood and childhood: http://tinyurl.com/4hsn9um4 How do you incorporate play into your life? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/up29j8zk

Duration:00:19:29

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Happiness Break: A Meditation on Playfulness, With Dacher Keltner

2/22/2024
We all have a playful side, and research shows acting on it can help us when we need to move through challenging emotions, manage conflict, and be more creative. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/4bxtn9ek How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin the practice. Focus on breathing deeply. Think back to a moment of play during your childhood. Recall specific details like your age, what you were doing and who you were with. As you remember, notice how the memory is affecting you in the present moment. Next, focus on a recent memory of play – maybe with your partner, friends, or family. Fully recall the moment, again bringing to mind specific details. Notice how this memory makes you feel. Take note of how reflecting on play has affected your breathing. Did it affect the tight areas in your body? How about the relaxed and open ones? As you refocus your attention on your breath, make a commitment to add play into your busy schedule going forward. Today’s Happiness Break host: Dacher Keltner is the host of the Greater Good Science Center’s award-winning podcast, The Science of Happiness and is a co-instructor of the GGSC’s popular online course of the same name. He’s also the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. Check out Dacher’s most recent book, *Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life: *<https://tinyurl.com/4j4hcvyt\](https://tinyurl.com/4j4hcvyt) More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: What Happens When We Play (The Science of Happiness Podcast): http://tinyurl.com/mrfm5pj5 Can We Play? http://tinyurl.com/prhv22rf What Playfulness Can Do for Your Relationship: http://tinyurl.com/n9b3h7e4 For Black Children, Play Can Be Transformative: http://tinyurl.com/mwnfcu26 What memories of play came to your mind? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: http://tinyurl.com/ycydhyxz Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: http://tinyurl.com/ycydhyxz We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.

Duration:00:06:38

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Encore: How to Feel Less Pressed for Time

2/15/2024
When we devote a little time to the other people in our life, we actually feel like we have more of it. Our guest tried a practice to regain control of his time and schedule Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/mr3r6jfn Episode summary: Like many of us, our guest Bryant Terry felt like he never had enough time in his day. And while he was eager to reconnect with his family, his schedule was spiraling out of control. For our show, Bryant tried a practice proven to help you feel like you have more time, by specifically devoting some of your time to others. He set intentions to spend quality time with his children doing activities that they truly enjoy. By prioritizing those special moments with his family, Bryant felt more control over his schedule, recognizing that he has the power to make time for what truly matters to him. Later, we hear from professor Cassie Mogilner Holmes about why this practice works, and how being intentional with our time can reshape our relationship with it. Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/gift_of_time Practice Think of a person whom you care about. What might you be able to do for this person that entails nothing more than the giving of your time? Plan a gift of time for this person and give it, whether it means doing something with them (in person or virtually). Spend as much time as needed to do the favor well and do not take any shortcuts. You might even consider taking off your watch or putting your smartphone away. Today’s guests: Bryant Terry is an award winning chef, author and artist. Learn about Bryant’s work: http://tinyurl.com/3wf3264h Follow Bryant on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/2w68z8bc Learn about his imprint, 4 Color Books: http://tinyurl.com/yuhrsrp8 Cassie Mogilner Holmes is a professor of marketing and behavioral decision making at UCLA. Learn about Cassie’s work: http://tinyurl.com/rb5r97s5 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Feel Like You Have More Time: http://tinyurl.com/p6ykm7y2 Ten Ways to Make Your Time Matter: http://tinyurl.com/34dvwnv4 Why You Never Seem to Have Enough Time: http://tinyurl.com/4t8vyhy3 Can Awe Buy You More Time and Happiness? http://tinyurl.com/m28d8wcx How to Spend Your Time on What Matters Most: http://tinyurl.com/ycw527tj More Resources on spending quality time with others: BBC - How to feel more in control of your time: http://tinyurl.com/nhbt7btm Stanford - Jennifer Aaker: How to Feel Like You Have More Time: http://tinyurl.com/n8cc6yfk Harvard -You’ll Feel Less Rushed If You Give Time Away: http://tinyurl.com/yc86ymve How do you devote time to others? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/yjdesnze

Duration:00:15:43

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Happiness Break: Wrap Yourself in Kindness, With Jack Kornfield

2/8/2024
When we treat ourselves with kindness and gratitude, research shows we feel more motivated and less self-critical. Meditation teacher Jack Kornfield leads in a practice where we gently turn inward. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/yfbz28h2 How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin the practice. Focus on taking deep breaths, relaxing your body. As you recognize the different sensations in your body, consciously envelope yourself in kindness. Thank your body for providing and caring for you. Redirect your loving kindness towards your heart and the varied emotions it carries.Thank your heart for all it does for you. Then, focus your kindness towards your mind and all the thoughts and worries it holds. Thank it for all that it does. Next, turn towards your consciousness as a whole – your emotions, body, thoughts. Rest in a state of comfortable, loving-kindness. When you’re ready, gently open your eyes and reconnect with the world around you. Today’s Happiness Break host: Jack Kornfield is a meditation teacher and author who is one of the leading voices to share Buddhist teachings with a Western audiences. Learn more about Jack’s work: http://tinyurl.com/2wfth7v2 Follow Jack on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/3zs2bjvx Follow Jack on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/bd5r9k4a Follow Jack on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/mryr839y More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Take Our Self-Compassion Quiz: https://tinyurl.com/yysrf663 How to Bring Self-Compassion to Work with You: https://tinyurl.com/45zkrkam The Five Myths of Self-Compassion: https://tinyurl.com/2p88vass How Gratitude Changes You and Your Brain: http://tinyurl.com/2f78cywf Is Gratitude Good for Your Health? http://tinyurl.com/yc86ve9d We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of gratitude and self-compassion. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We’re living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That’s where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.

Duration:00:09:07