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Addressing Gettysburg

History Podcasts

As seen on NBC’s TODAY Show. Gettysburg's Flagship podcast dedicated to telling the stories of Gettysburg. The show has taken on a few different formats. 1. The Narrative episodes: Tell the history of the Gettysburg Campaign starting with the battle of Antietam, and going through the Battle of Gettysburg and beyond. These are researched and written with the help of local historians and will feature original music, and guest voiceovers. 2. Ask a Gettysburg Guide: We host a variety of different Licensed Battlefield Guides and ask them questions (submitted by our Patreon Patrons) about the Battle of Gettysburg. If you have a question you’d like answered, please become a Patron at www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg 3. Gettysburg NPS Winter Lecture Series: We record as many Winter Lectures as we are able to. Those who can’t attend these lectures will be able to hear these amazing talks with some of the best authors, Rangers, and Guides Gettysburg has to offer. 4. Premium Content: The premium content will take many forms. The content can be accessed by being a Patreon supporter. If you are interested in supporting the podcast and accessing this great content visit www.Patreon.com/addressinggettysburg Thank You for listening.

Location:

United States

Description:

As seen on NBC’s TODAY Show. Gettysburg's Flagship podcast dedicated to telling the stories of Gettysburg. The show has taken on a few different formats. 1. The Narrative episodes: Tell the history of the Gettysburg Campaign starting with the battle of Antietam, and going through the Battle of Gettysburg and beyond. These are researched and written with the help of local historians and will feature original music, and guest voiceovers. 2. Ask a Gettysburg Guide: We host a variety of different Licensed Battlefield Guides and ask them questions (submitted by our Patreon Patrons) about the Battle of Gettysburg. If you have a question you’d like answered, please become a Patron at www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg 3. Gettysburg NPS Winter Lecture Series: We record as many Winter Lectures as we are able to. Those who can’t attend these lectures will be able to hear these amazing talks with some of the best authors, Rangers, and Guides Gettysburg has to offer. 4. Premium Content: The premium content will take many forms. The content can be accessed by being a Patreon supporter. If you are interested in supporting the podcast and accessing this great content visit www.Patreon.com/addressinggettysburg Thank You for listening.

Language:

English


Episodes
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Scandal in Litchfield County, Connecticut- with Peter Vermilyea

7/15/2024
Peter Vermilyea is on to talk about his book Litchfield County and the Civil War . This is an interesting topic and the deepest of dives to take, but it's not without its mysteries and scandals. Become a Patron to support the on-going efforts of AG and hear the rest of this episode. www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg

Duration:00:15:06

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GNMP UPDATE- Little Round Top Opening and Permits with NPS Communications Specialist Jason Martz

7/10/2024
GNMP Communications Specialist Jason Martz joins us for the first time to update us on Little Round Top's reopening, mostly, but we dip our toes into the complicated and confusing issue that has recently curbed many people's enjoyment of the Park: PERMITS! We briefly get into the how, why and what of them so that you and I can understand just what's going on. This episode is brought to you by our delicious coffee brand Little Ground Top(TM) available here www.addressinggettysburg.com/cafe or at Bantam Roasters at 82 Steinwehr Ave in Gettysburg.

Duration:00:54:36

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Battle of Gettysburg- July 3, 1863- 161st Anniversary Special

7/6/2024
Don't forget to delight your coffee-loving tastebuds with our first coffee brand "Little Ground Top". Grab a bag next time you're in town at Bantam Roasters (82 Steinwehr Ave) or have some sent to your home or office by ordering at www.addressinggettysburg.com/cafe Also, I almost died making these in a week and a half, but our studio computer's hard drive actually did die in the process. RIP. So, become a Patron! www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg As Dawn approached on July 3, Robert E. Lee considered his options. The attacks of the day before had achieved limited success, with the capture of ground, the wrecking of the Federal Third Corps and the bloodying of two others. Yet, the Confederates had not accomplished their objective of driving the Union soldiers off of Cemetery Hill. It had been touch-and-go many times, but every breakthrough had been met with Union reinforcements. But, in war, even limited success could be considered something to build on to achieve victory. According to his after-battle report, Lee wrote that the plan had remained unchanged from the day before. Reinforcing their gains on Culp's Hill from the night before and renewing the attack on the Union Right would be Richard Ewell's Corps. During the growing darkness of the night before, the Confederates had captured some vacant Union fortifications. A renewal of the attacks on the Union position could threaten the Army of the Potomac and their avenue of resupply along the Baltimore Pike. At the same time, reinforced with a fresh division of Virginians under George Pickett, James Longstreet was to renew his attack from the day before on the southern end of the battlefield on the Union Left. While such a plan was indicated in his report after the battle, Longstreet would contend that he did not receive orders to that effect the night before when he had visited with Lee. It was a confusion of orders that would ultimately lead to inaction on the southern end of the battlefield on the morning of July 3. The same could not be said about what occurred on the Union Right. The Union forces would initiate an attack for the first time since the battle began. Union 12th Corps soldiers returning from being sent to reinforce the southern end of the battlefield would find in the darkness of the morning that the fortifications they had built were now occupied by some squatters with unfriendly dispositions. When informed of this, Union 12th Corps commander Henry Slocum declared that the men of the 12th Corps would drive them out in the morning. At around 4 in the morning, the Union artillery opened fire. A Union artillerist would later write, "We poured shot and shell into them." These missiles of death and destruction would splinter trees and send branches careening to the earth and on top of Rebel soldiers. This morning, the fighting on Culp's Hill foreshadowed what the war would become. It was not the pageantry of bayonets gleaming in the sunlight, banners fluttering in the air, or officers leading their men with their hats on the tips of their swords across open fields. Instead, wave upon wave of Rebel soldiers, including the vaunted Stonewall Brigade, would throw themselves into the hellfire sent their way by the enemy in relative safety behind breastworks or in trenches. Some Union soldiers reported that they fired as many as 200 rounds. Still, the Confederates came on as reinforcements arrived. Every attack was futile and found limited or no success. But the futile attacks were not restricted to the Confederates that morning. The 2nd Massachusetts and the 27th Indiana were ordered to charge across Spangler's Meadow toward Confederates behind a stone wall. Lt. Colonel Mudge, upon receiving the order, stated, "It is murder, but it is the order." Then, to his men, he yelled, "Up, men, over the works! Forward, double quick !" Both regiments would attack and were bloodily repulsed. Mudge, who had been a sparring partner of Robert...

Duration:01:09:05

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July 3 Anniversary Episode Delay

7/2/2024
In case you haven't guessed it, the format for these anniversary episodes is a tad, what we call, "toime-consuming". July 3rd's will be a day or two late. Just in case you're dying to find out how this battle ends. [coughs] www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg

Duration:00:03:53

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Battle of Gettysburg- July 2, 1863- 161st Anniversary Special

7/2/2024
Start your day RIGHT with our new coffee brand Little Ground Top by ordering your bags here www.addressinggettysburg.com/cafe Help us hire a staff for these labor-intensive episodes. It'll only take a few thousand of ye! ;-) Become a Patron and learn more about the Civil War with over 300 episodes just for you. www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg During the early morning hours of July 2, an already sleep-deprived Union Army of the Potomac commander, George Gordon Meade, arrived at Gettysburg to find fresh Federal soldiers reinforcing the battered elements of the army from the previous day's battle. After conferring with his subordinates, Meade rode out to look at the ground. He decided to stay and fight. The Union position was a strong one. Cemetery Hill dominated the surrounding landscape and offered the Union defenders a strong artillery position. Two key roads that led into Gettysburg from Maryland intersected just north of the hill. Those two roads were crucial avenues of resupply and, if necessary, retreat for the Union Army. The side controlling the hill controlled the field, but the position had one weakness. When he arrived the previous day to act in Meade's stead, Union Second Corps Commander Winfield Scott Hancock assessed the position and reported to Meade that it was strong, but the Confederates could turn its left flank. This fact didn't escape Robert E. Lee's experienced eye, either. He astutely turned his attention to planning the action for July 2, devising a strategy that would test the mettle of the Union Army. With Meade deciding to stay, Lee needed to determine the best way to knock the Federals off their strong position. A direct assault on Cemetery Hill could prove devastating for Lee's infantry as they would have to cross open farm fields to attack the hill. Subordinate commanders convinced Lee not to attack the Union Right near Culp's Hill. Just before dawn, Lee dispatched reconnaissance parties to determine the terrain on the Union left and the dispositions of the Army of the Potomac. One such party returned and reported no Union soldiers in the area of Little Round Top. After conferring with his commanders, Lee made his decision. James Longstreet, his trusted second-in-command, his "old warhorse," would take two divisions and, under concealment, get into position to attack the flank of the Union Line. Once Longstreet was in position. His orders directed him to attack north, along the Emmitsburg Road, and roll up the Union left. While Longstreet was executing this move [getting into position?], Ewell's Second Corps would demonstrate on the Union Right to prevent reinforcements from being sent to meet Longstreet. Ewell's demonstration would become an attack if Ewell thought it feasible. [Chas Fennell on this part of the plan] It was a bold plan. One that Confederate General James Longstreet did not care for, but, ever the consummate soldier, he followed orders. Longstreet's Corps, consisting of three divisions under Generals McLaws, Pickett, and Hood, was initially delayed due to the absence of Pickett's division, which was still over 20 miles away. Despite Longstreet's request to wait for Pickett, Lee urged action but acquiesced to Longstreet's request to wait for one of the brigades from Hood's division before commencing the attack. It would be nearly One in the afternoon before Longstreet's march began. While Lee dealt with the logistics of implementing his plans, Meade had his own difficulties with Daniel Sickles, a New York politician-turned-general and Meade's Third Corps Commander. Meade had assigned defensive positions to all of his commands in what is now known as the Fish Hook line. The reason for Sickles' assigned position was either not made apparent to him or was certainly not to his liking. Throughout the morning, Sickles tried to get Meade's permission to redeploy his Corps to what he thought was a better position on higher ground along the Emmitsburg Road....

Duration:01:14:38

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Battle of Gettysburg- July 1, 1863- 161st Anniversary

7/1/2024
INTRODUCTING! Our first coffee brand LITTLE GROUND TOP, expertly roasted by our friends at Bantam Roaster. Order your bags at https://www.addressinggettysburg.com/cafe THIS EPISODE was made possible by our generous Patrons. Become one today and get more than you bargain for! www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg On the first day of July, they arrived shrouded in a foreboding misty rain. The Confederate infantry division of Major General Henry Heth from A.P. Hill's Third Corps advanced towards Gettysburg under a veil of uncertainty. While crossing a bridge over Marsh Creek, the head of Heth's column was halted by the familiar "pop" of enemy small arms some 700 yards away. It was a shot from the carbine of the 8th Illinois Cavalry's Lieutenant Marcellus Jones. The ball had begun; The Battle of Gettysburg was underway. The gray soldiers, anticipating a militia, were surprised by Union cavalry. This surprise, however, did not deter them. Instead, it spurred them into a cautious advance, moving from column into skirmish lines in the fields north and south of the Chambersburg Pike. John Buford, the Union Cavalry commander, was tactically maneuvering to buy time—time that the Union left-wing commander, John Reynolds, needed to rush his infantry up to Gettysburg. Buford had gathered intelligence that Confederate soldiers were to the north and west of Gettysburg. Armed with this crucial information, Buford strategically positioned his men to cover every major road coming in from the west, north, and east of Gettysburg. The shots fired indicated that the first Confederates were approaching from the west, a testament to Buford's strategic foresight. Upon being fired upon, the Confederates, seemingly undeterred by the presence of Union Cavalry, began a slow and methodical advance. Like a grey bank of storm clouds, they pushed back Buford's men from Knoxlyn Ridge to Herr's Ridge and, finally, to McPherson's Ridge, where Buford intended to hold until the infantry arrived. At Willoughby's Run, in the valley between Herr's and McPherson's Ridges, the veteran Confederate infantry briefly halted and organized themselves before pressing onward up the slope against Buford's brigades under Colonel Gamble and Devin. Just as the Confederates were gaining ground, the emergence of Union infantry, a complete shock to them, marked a significant turning point in the morning's battle. The unexpected arrival of the Union infantry changed the dynamics of the fight, and what started as a skirmish between cavalry and infantry was about to become a full-throated battle. Brigadier General Joseph Davis's Brigade of Mississippi and North Carolina men rapidly approached Cutler's right-two regiments, the 76th N.Y. and 56th P.A., from the west. The 56th Pennsylvania opened fire first with the command, 'Ready, right oblique! Aim! Fire!' The 2nd Mississippi and 55th North Carolina returned fire. Some of these shots raked the 76th New York as they got into position to the Pennsylvania men's right. At first, the 76th's commander didn't realize that these shots were from the enemy as he could not see any. He urged his men to hold their fire. Then a second volley came in, and still they held their fire. Finally, the 2nd Mississippi came into sight, and Major Grover, the 76th's commander, ordered his men to fire. After about a half-an-hour of fighting, three of Cutler's regiments, the 56th P.A. and the 76th and 147th N.Y., withdrew to Oak Ridge, having lost half of their men. Davis's men pursued Cutler's shattered regiments to Oak Ridge. Cutler had left two regiments on the south side of the Chambersburg Pike at the McPherson Farm. They had skirmished with Archer's brigade as it approached from the west. Cutler's sister brigade, the Iron Brigade under Solomon Meredith, had arrived on the field and was pushing into McPherson's Woods, thereby freeing up Cutler's remaining two regiments, the 84th and 95th N.Y., to turn and face the threat posed by Davis's...

Duration:00:52:00

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Stand To It and Give Them Hell- John Michael Priest

6/24/2024
“Stand to It and Give Them Hell” chronicles the Gettysburg fighting from Cemetery Ridge to Little Round Top on July 2, 1863, through the letters, memoirs, diaries, and postwar recollections of the men from both armies who struggled to control that “hallowed ground.” John Michael Priest, dubbed the “Ernie Pyle” of the Civil War soldier, wrote this book to help readers understand and experience, as closely as possible through the written word, the stress and terror of that fateful day in Pennsylvania. Readers will gain a deeper appreciation of the personal sacrifice made that awful day by privates and generals alike. This invaluable method uses their own words to paint a rich tapestry of their personal courage and cowardice, and their failures and triumphs. Nearly 60 detailed maps, mostly on the regimental level, illustrate the tremendous troop congestion in the Wheatfield, the Peach Orchard, and Devil’s Den. They accurately establish, by regiment or by company, the extent of the Federal skirmish line from Ziegler’s Grove to the Slyder farm and portray the final Confederate push against the Codori farm and the center of Cemetery Ridge, which three Confederate divisions in what is popularly known as Pickett’s Charge would unsuccessfully attack on the final day of fighting. This is a book about combat as seen through the eyes of those who waged it. There is no glamour here, and no adventure. Nor are there accusations, confessions, or second-guessing from the comfort of an easy chair. Instead, “Stand to It and Give Them Hell” offers the brutal, heart-wrenching story of a slice of America’s greatest battle as described by those who marched, fought, bled, and died there. This is their story, and it is one you will long remember.

Duration:00:15:17

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The Irish in the Civil War- CWI Summer Conference 2024

6/19/2024
Ryan Keating (California State University—San Bernardino) talks about the Irish in the Civil War

Duration:01:03:11

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Atrocity in the Civil War- Jaime Martinez, Cecily Zander, Ethan Rafuse, Angela Riotto- Moderated by Aaron Sheehan-Dean

6/19/2024
A panel from CWI's 2024 Summer Conference about atrocities in the Civil War. What defined an atrocity? What were the different types of atrocity? Historians Jaime Martinez, Cecily Zander, Ethan Rafuse, Angela Riotto and Aaron Sheehan-Dean explore this difficult topic.

Duration:01:23:16

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Did Civil War Soldiers Hide the Real War?- CWI Summer Conference 2024

6/17/2024
Sunday, June 9, 2024, 10:45 am. Frances Clarke (The University of Sydney), Rebecca Jo Plant (University of California, San Diego), Jim Broomall (Shepherd University). Moderator: Brian Luskey (West Virginia University) explore the question "Did Civil War Soldiers Hide the Real War?"

Duration:00:54:52

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The 1913 Gettysburg Reunion- Thomas Flagel- CWI 2024 Summer Conference

6/13/2024
Thomas R. Flagel is associate professor of history at Columbia State Community College in Tennessee. The author of several books, Flagel has also worked with multiple historic preservation groups including the Civil War Trust and the National Park Service. Union and Confederate veterans meet at Gettysburg on the 50th anniversary of the battle This June 29-July 4 reunion drew over 55,000 official attendees plus thousands more who descended upon a town of 4,000 during the scorching summer of 1913, with the promise of little more than a cot and two blankets, military fare, and the presence of countless adversaries from a horrific war. Most were revisiting a time and place in their personal history that involved acute physical and emotional trauma. Contrary to popular belief, veterans were not motivated to attend by a desire for reconciliation, nor did the Great Reunion produce a general sense of a reunified country. The reconciliation premise, advanced by several major speeches at the anniversary, lived in rhetoric more than fact. Recent scholarship effectively dismantles this "Reconciliation of 1913" mythos, finding instead that sectionalism and lingering hostilities largely prevailed among veterans and civilians. Flagel examines how individual veterans viewed the reunion, what motivated them to attend, how they acted and reacted once they arrived, and whether these survivors found what they were personally seeking. While politicians and the press characterized the veterans as relics of a national crusade, Flagel focuses on four men who come to the reunion for different and very individual reasons. Flagel's book adds significantly to Gettysburg literature and to Civil War historiography. Source: Publisher

Duration:00:51:36

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John Pope and the Massacre of the Sioux- Dr. Cecily Zander- CWI Summer Conference 2024

6/12/2024
Cecily N. Zander is a historian of the Civil War era and the American West. At Texas Woman’s University, she offers courses on American history, military history, memory and popular culture. She received her PhD from Penn State in 2021. Her first book, The Army Under Fire: Antimilitarism in the Civil War Era, will be published by Louisiana State University Press in February 2024. She also serves as chief historian at Emerging Civil War, a popular outlet for accessible writing about the Civil War era. It has been over 150 years since the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, a disastrous time in Minnesota history. The war had a profound impact in shaping Minnesota as we know it today. This site is a resource for learning about the war, its causes, and its far-reaching consequences. Join us on YouTube for an interview with Dr. Zander. Click here

Duration:00:46:52

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CWI Summer Conference '24 - Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain - Ronald C White

6/8/2024
It's CWI Summer Conference time again and we will release random talks from the weekend as we are able. Here is one done by Ronald C White on Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, in support of his new book "On Great Fields: The Life and Unlikely Heroism of Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain." This talk was given on Friday, June 7, 2024 at 4:30 p.m.

Duration:00:45:48

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A Beginner's Guide to the Battle of Gettysburg

6/5/2024
If you're visiting Gettysburg soon, you might want to listen to this episode (and all our others) before taking any tour. History podcasts, like this one, like to get deep into the weeds. While that might be good for the lifelong Gettysnerd™, most visitors to Gettysburg have never even seen the movie, let alone read a book about it, so they are coming at it cold. Where did I get that statistic? Totally made it up, but I made it up based on meeting thousands of visitors over the last 18-20 years. Anyway, I asked LBGs Bob Steenstra and Deb Novotny, both retired educators, to help me break down the battle of Gettysburg to what you need to understand before diving in. As much as we try to keep it at a 30,000-foot level, we do dive into the weeds once in a while. Maybe it will make sense to you newbies, maybe it won't, but it will someday. Enjoy your visit and and we hope we can soon count you among the ranks of Gettysnerds™ out there! This episode is brought to you without commercial interruption by our Officers' Club at www.patreon.com/addressiggettysburg

Duration:02:16:15

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The Licensed Battlefield Guide Exam Process with Ranger Angie Atkinson

6/4/2024
Ranger Angie Atkinson joins me to clear up some of the misunderstandings about the licensed battlefield guide exam being given this December. In this episode we explore the process of being evaluated for a license to give tours in Gettysburg National Military Park. What can you expect for the written test? What comes next if you pass? What happens if you fail the oral exam? All these questions and more are answered. Just hit play

Duration:01:47:02

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Ask A Gettysburg Guide #90 | Hall's Brigade | with Wayne Motts and Zachery Fry

6/3/2024
LBG Wayne Motts and historian Zackery Fry join me for an Ask A Guide about Hall's Brigade during the battle of Gettysburg. From the Monument: July 2. Took position on the line at the left of Second Brigade and of the copse of trees. The 19th Mass. and 42d New York were late in the day advanced to support Second Division Third Corps but retired on Second Division being forced back. The Brigade was attacked by Brig. Gen. Wright’s Brigade which overrun Battery A 1st Rhode Island then in advance but was repulsed with heavy loss and forced beyond the Emmitsburg Road. July 3. Remained in position. At 3 P. M. Longstreet’s assault was made after a cannonade of two hours. The Brigade and the Second Brigade received the charge of Major Gen. Pickett’s Division which was repulsed with great loss in killed wounded prisoners and flags. In this engagement the First Brigade and the other troops were rushed to support of the two Brigades engaged and contributed to the victory. The Brigade remained in its position until the close of the battle. Casualties Killed 6 Officers 75 Men Wounded 29 Officers 253 Men Captured or Missing 14 Men Total 377 Support the Show by: Becoming a Patron- https://www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg . Now with a FREE TRIAL for 2nd Lieutenants Subscribing to our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@addressinggettysburg Donate via PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=6394Y8C2XUH38 Grabbing some merch- https://www.addressinggettysburg.com/shop Getting a book- https://www.addressinggettysburg.com/books Joining our book club: Email addressinggettysburgbookclub@gmail.com to get in! Joining our Film Club: Email AGFilmClub1863@gmail.com to get in! Supporting Our Sponsors: You best be visiting our Studio Sponsor, The Gettysburg Museum of History- www.gettysburgmuseumofhistory.com Go to the Gettysburg Film Festival! https://gettysburgfilmfestival.org/2024-festival/ Help Historian Eric Wittenberg Fight Cancer: https://www.gofundme.com/f/please-consider-helping-eric-and-susan-wittenberg Baer Sign- www.baersign.com The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides https://gettysburgtourguides.org/albgseminar/ Mike Scott Voice- https://www.mikescottvoice.com Seminary Ridge Museum- https://www.seminaryridgemuseum.org/ For the Historian- Mention us for 20% off retail sales (in store) plus free shipping (online)- https://www.forthehistorian.com The Badgemaker- https://www.civilwarcorpsbadges.com Civil War Trails- https://www.civilwartrails.com Bantam Roasters Use "HANCOCK" for 10% off your order https://www.raggededgerc.com/ Buy Billy Webster's Album "Marching Through Georgia - https://billysongs.com Check out Jonathan Lucci's new novel: https://www.theheavensfalling.com/ Join the NACWM- https://www.nacwm.org/ TRHistorical: www.trhistorical.com Music possibly by: "Garryowen" by Billy Webster: www.billysongs.com Camp Chase Fifes & Drums: https://www.campchasefifesanddrums.org California Consolidated Drum Band check them out here: https://www.facebook.com/CCDrumBand Kevin MacLeod: www.incompetech.com The Federal City Brass Band- www.jvmusic.net

Duration:02:36:19

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Frederick Douglass Comes to Gettysburg 1869 with LBG Kevin Bryant

5/20/2024
In January of 1869, Frederick Douglass came to Gettysburg. He faced death threats, but he delivered his own "Gettysburg Address" nonetheless. We don't know exactly what he said, but historians are able to glean what he most likely said based on speeches he gave elsewhere during his speaking tour of that time. LBG Kevin Bryant joins us once again to talk about Frederick Douglass at Gettysburg. There are hundreds more episodes like this available in our Officers' Club at www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg . Becoming a patron helps us produce more educational and entertaining shows that help to keep history alive. We appreciate your support in this endeavor.

Duration:00:15:48

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Ask A Gettysburg Guide #89- Confederate Officers' Wounds with LBG Rick Schroeder

5/13/2024
LBG Rick Schroeder is back with the companion episode to our "Famous Union Officers' Wounds" episode . In this one we talk about those famous Confederate wounds. For those of you interested in Civil War medicine, these episodes are MUST-LISTEN episodes. Support the Show by: Becoming a Patron- https://www.patreon.com/addressinggettysburg . Now with a FREE TRIAL for 2nd Lieutenants Subscribing to our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@addressinggettysburg Donate via PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=6394Y8C2XUH38 Grabbing some merch- https://www.addressinggettysburg.com/shop Getting a book- https://www.addressinggettysburg.com/books Joining our book club: Email addressinggettysburgbookclub@gmail.com to get in! Joining our Film Club: Email AGFilmClub1863@gmail.com to get in! Supporting Our Sponsors: You best be visiting our Studio Sponsor, The Gettysburg Museum of History- www.gettysburgmuseumofhistory.com Go to the Gettysburg Film Festival! https://gettysburgfilmfestival.org/2024-festival/ Help Historian Eric Wittenberg Fight Cancer: https://www.gofundme.com/f/please-consider-helping-eric-and-susan-wittenberg Baer Sign- www.baersign.com The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides https://gettysburgtourguides.org/albgseminar/ Mike Scott Voice- https://www.mikescottvoice.com Seminary Ridge Museum- https://www.seminaryridgemuseum.org/ For the Historian- Mention us for 20% off retail sales (in store) plus free shipping (online)- https://www.forthehistorian.com The Badgemaker- https://www.civilwarcorpsbadges.com Civil War Trails- https://www.civilwartrails.com Bantam Roasters Use "HANCOCK" for 10% off your order https://www.raggededgerc.com/ Buy Billy Webster's Album "Marching Through Georgia - https://billysongs.com Check out Jonathan Lucci's new novel: https://www.theheavensfalling.com/ Join the NACWM- https://www.nacwm.org/ TRHistorical: www.trhistorical.com Music possibly by: "Garryowen" by Billy Webster: www.billysongs.com Camp Chase Fifes & Drums: https://www.campchasefifesanddrums.org California Consolidated Drum Band check them out here: https://www.facebook.com/CCDrumBand Kevin MacLeod: www.incompetech.com The Federal City Brass Band- www.jvmusic.net

Duration:02:18:00

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SPOTLIGHT ON: Michael "Six Questions" Lentz

5/6/2024
Everybody knows Michael "Six Questions" Lentz. But do we REALLY know him? Well, by the end of this episode, you will. Mike sat down with me in 2023 to do a SPOTLIGHT ON while we were still in the shed studio with no electricity. Ah the good old days! Anyway, we discussed myriad topics from his birth in Oregon, childhood in Colorado, his discovery of the Civil War, his first trip to Gettysburg; his career in politics, the state of our political system and how our community at AG could be the antidote the nation needs right now (ok, maybe I'm exaggerating there a bit...or am I?) and the time Mike wore a mascot's costume and was beaten by children. All this and MORE in this SPOTLIGHT ON

Duration:00:15:53

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Get Out of the Car 2024- Abner Doubleday On July 1, 1863- May 25th

5/1/2024
ABNER DOUBLEDAY ON JULY 1, 1863 (MAY 25 – 10:00 A.M.) “General Reynolds was killed early this morning. In my opinion, there seems to be no directing person”. When Brigadier General John Buford sent this message to Major General Alfred Pleasonton on the afternoon of July 1, 1863, did it plant the seed in Major General George Meade’s mind that a new commander was needed for the Union First Corps? Join us as we explore the leadership of Major General Abner Doubleday on July 1, 1863. MEET AT DOUBLEDAY MONUMENT. ENDS AT LUTHERAN SEMINARY. PARK WHERE LEGAL

Duration:00:16:29