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Footnoting History

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Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. The brainchild of Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge, Footnoting History began airing in February 2013 and has been growing ever since. Our rotating ensemble of podcasters all possess graduate degrees in the field of history. Each historian conducts his or her own research and creates the content of their episode. We are lucky to have members with varied passions, both in terms of periods and topics, and you never know what the next episode will be about!

Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. The brainchild of Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge, Footnoting History began airing in February 2013 and has been growing ever since. Our rotating ensemble of podcasters all possess graduate degrees in the field of history. Each historian conducts his or her own research and creates the content of their episode. We are lucky to have members with varied passions, both in terms of periods and topics, and you never know what the next episode will be about!
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. The brainchild of Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge, Footnoting History began airing in February 2013 and has been growing ever since. Our rotating ensemble of podcasters all possess graduate degrees in the field of history. Each historian conducts his or her own research and creates the content of their episode. We are lucky to have members with varied passions, both in terms of periods and topics, and you never know what the next episode will be about!

Language:

English

Contact:

6464963620


Episodes

History for Halloween VI

10/19/2019
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(Christine, Elizabeth, Kristin, Lesley, and Lucy) Ghosts, vampires, and more lurk in this year's installment of History for Halloween. Join us for our traditional episode featuring bits of history perfect for the creepiest time of the year.

Duration:00:27:17

The Chinese Exclusion Act

10/5/2019
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(Nathan) In the 19th century, the Qing government of China faced major setbacks in the wake of military conflicts with European powers, spurring economic downturn and an immigration exodus out of the country. Increasing numbers of Chinese began to arrive on the West Coast of the United States, drawn by the California Gold Rush and seeking new economic opportunities to support their extended families back in China. Soon, however, American economic conditions began to take on racist overtones,...

Duration:00:24:16

The Life and Travels of Newport Gardner

9/21/2019
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(Kristin) In the 1760s, Occramer Marycoo was taken to the American colonies against his will. When he re-crossed the Atlantic in 1826, he was a free man who also went by the name Newport Gardner. In between, he was a composer, a teacher, a small-business owner, and a prominent member of Newport, Rhode Island Free African community. In this episode, Kristin follows the remarkable journey of the man, who bought his freedom and returned to Africa, known as both Occramer Marycoo and Newport...

Duration:00:20:38

Evil Humors and the Common Cold

9/7/2019
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(Lucy) Ache in the head, running of the nose, and the throat being pierced by pain like a spear: medieval descriptions of common ailments are often familiar, as well as startlingly vivid. This podcast episode looks at everyday remedies in medieval Europe. From chicken and barley to spiced wine, many such remedies were delicious and nutritious. Administering medicine — from comfort food to careful concoctions — was based on both education and experience. Further Reading Winston Black, "I...

Duration:00:11:30

Revolutionary Notre-Dame de Paris

8/24/2019
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(Christine and Elizabeth) In April 2019, a fire at the French cathedral Notre-Dame de Paris had people around the world glued to their news feeds and televisions. Join Christine and Elizabeth for a discussion about some significant events that took place at Notre-Dame during one of France’s most turbulent periods, the span from the French Revolution to the exile of Napoleon III. Further Reading Diana Reid Haig, Walks Through Marie Antoinette’s Paris, Ravenhall Books, (2006). Christopher...

Duration:00:28:30

The Emu War

8/10/2019
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(Lesley) Of all the wars in the 20th century, no loss was more frustrating than the military operation against the emu in Western Australia in 1932. Learn about the treatment of these enormous flightless birds as an organized military formation and the subsequent disaster as no amount of military force could successfully and effectively defeat these warriors of the animal world. Further Reading Adrian Burton, "Tell me, mate, what were emus like?", Frontiers in Ecology and the...

Duration:00:15:30

An Extraordinary Medicine Called Theriac

7/27/2019
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(Kristin) Theriac was a medicine of legendary origins, multiple ingredients, and a reputation for efficacy that extended for hundreds of years. It was said to be able to cure everything from migraines to the plague. In this episode, Kristin looks at some of the ingredients and processes that went into making theriac, where it could be found, who was selling it, and whether there was anything behind its extraordinary claims. Further Reading Howard Brody, “Ritual, Medicine, and the Placebo...

Duration:00:19:17

Purgatory is Not the Medium Place

7/13/2019
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(Nathan) The landscape of the Christian afterlife has never been static, and over the last 2,000 years, the theology of what the hereafter looks like has evolved drastically. In this episode, we trace the origins and medieval development of one of the most significant and controversial Christian beliefs: Purgatory. Further Reading Jacques Le Goff, The Birth of Purgatory, Trans. Arthur Goldhammer., University of Chicago Press, 1986. Abagail Frey, ed. A New History of Penance. Brill,...

Duration:00:43:26

Jessie Pope, (In)Famous Poet of World War One

5/18/2019
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(Elizabeth) One of the most famous poets of WWI is largely unknown today. In this episode, Elizabeth reviews the life and poems of Jessie Pope to determine who she was, why Wilfred Owen hated her so, and why we don't know more about her today.

Duration:00:17:41

The Woman Who Signed the Declaration of Independence

5/4/2019
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(Lesley) The Declaration of Independence has many well-known men's names on it, especially that of John Hancock. But what of the woman whose name appears on the printed version of this auspicious document? In this episode, Lesley explores the life and role of early American printer Mary Katharine Goddard. An important contributor to the fledgling American government, Goddard's name should be better known for politics, journalism, and revolution.

Duration:00:14:15

King John and His Dogs

4/20/2019
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(Kristin) King John is often remembered as one of England’s most inept and disliked rulers. By the time he was forced to sign the Magna Carta in 1215, John lost authority, territory, and a lot of friends. Some, however, did remain loyal. In this week’s episode, Kristin looks at King John and his dogs.

Duration:00:10:38

Harlem Renaissance Man: James Weldon Johnson

4/6/2019
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(Lucy) Diplomat and hymn-writer, Broadway lyricist, activist, and historian, James Weldon Johnson was an early figurehead of the NAACP. This week's episode explores his life and multifaceted legacy.

Duration:00:14:10

Henry II and Thomas Becket, Part II: Rivals

3/23/2019
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(Christine) Not all friendships are meant to last, but some go the extra mile and turn into bitter rivalries. Picking up where we left off at the end of Part I, this episode follows the relationship between King Henry II and Archbishop Thomas Becket to the violent ending that left only one man standing.

Duration:00:18:58

Henry II and Thomas Becket, Part I: Friends

3/9/2019
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(Christine) Being King of England isn't an easy task, but Henry II was aided by his good friend, Thomas Becket, serving as Chancellor. Then, Henry saw an opportunity to place Thomas in the highest position of power in the English church. What could go wrong?

Duration:00:16:27

The History of Grading

2/24/2019
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(Nathan) B-, 3.85, 16/20, upper second--modern methods of gauging a student's performance in a class can vary widely from country to country. But most of these systems are shockingly recent developments, and for much of human history "grades" as such didn't exist. In this episode, we'll look at the history of American systems of educational evaluation from their emergence in the 18th century to their standardization in the 20th. Further Reading Jack Schneider and Ethan Hutt. "Making the...

Duration:00:16:39

The End is Nigh! The Apocalypse in the Renaissance

2/9/2019
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(Lucy) At the dawn of the 1500s, Europe was enjoying more wealth than ever before. Consumption was conspicuous, luxury was accessible… and sin was rife. Preachers like Savonarola foretold the end of the world, and people listened. In this episode of Footnoting History, learn about falling church towers, divine portents, papal curses, and how the European populace dealt with new identities and new opportunities at the opening of the early modern period.

Duration:00:15:39

American Indian Prisoners of War ​

1/26/2019
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(Elizabeth) Wars between British colonizers and American Indians were a constant part of life in Colonial America. In this episode, Elizabeth explains the myriad ways American Indians became prisoners of war as well as how they were treated, including being sent as slaves to Barbados and other places.

Duration:00:14:57

Mao and His Mango

1/12/2019
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(Lesley) In 1968, an act of diplomacy between the Government of Pakistan and China’s Chairman Mao set off a series of actions that would create a cult around the mango fruit. Chairman Mao did not taste this fruit. Instead, he passed it on to workers as a symbol of his gratitude for their allegiance to him. What followed was a stunning spread of the mango throughout China. Set against the backdrop of famine and the “Four Pests,” the worship of this single fruit created complexity and...

Duration:00:15:57

Potosí: The Silver Mine that Changed the World

11/17/2018
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(Nathan) In 1545, a new Spanish mining town was founded in the Andes mountains of modern-day Bolivia, and for next 250 years, the mines of Potosí would fund the Spanish crown and its imperial ambitions. But what the Spanish did not know is that having too much silver could have disastrous consequences. In this episode, we will examine the history of New World silver and its effect on the world economy, the lives of the people who mined it, and how Bolivian silver contributed to global...

Duration:00:13:28

King Henry I of England and the White Ship

11/3/2018
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(Christine) In 1120, just when King Henry I of England thought he had achieved a much-needed peace, tragedy struck. What happened to the White Ship that broke the king's heart and changed the trajectory of the English monarchy? Find out on this episode.

Duration:00:24:40