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Then & Now

History Podcasts

Then & Now connects past to present, using historical analysis and context to help guide us through modern issues and policy decisions. Then & Now is brought to you by the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy. Then & Now is produced by Maia Ferdman and David Myers, and features original music by Daniel Raijman.

Then & Now connects past to present, using historical analysis and context to help guide us through modern issues and policy decisions. Then & Now is brought to you by the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy. Then & Now is produced by Maia Ferdman and David Myers, and features original music by Daniel Raijman.

Location:

United States

Description:

Then & Now connects past to present, using historical analysis and context to help guide us through modern issues and policy decisions. Then & Now is brought to you by the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy. Then & Now is produced by Maia Ferdman and David Myers, and features original music by Daniel Raijman.

Language:

English


Episodes

What is Afropessimism? A Conversation with Frank Wilderson

10/18/2021
This episode of Then & Now features a conversation with Frank B. Wilderson III, Chancellor's Professor of African American Studies at UC Irvine and author of the book Afropessimism. The conversation tracks his extraordinary life journey from youthful radical activism in Minnesota to a career as a stockbroker to participation in subversive activity for the African National Congress in South Africa. It also focuses on Wilderson's stark and unsparing philosophical stance of Afropessimism, which...

Duration:01:12:51

Leadership, Legacy, and Looking Ahead: A Conversation with Mayor Eric Garcetti

10/4/2021
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti joins this special episode in conversation with former LA County Supervisor and LCHP Board Member Zev Yaroslavsky. Mayor Garcetti reflects on his tenure as mayor, discussing his impact on issues ranging from homelessness to the 2028 Olympic Games, and sharing the surprises, lessons, and challenges of leadership.

Duration:00:51:17

What We Knew Then and What We Know Now: A Conversation about the COVID-19 Pandemic with Dr. Sharon Balter

9/20/2021
Dr. Sharon Balter, the Director of the Acute Communicable Disease Control Program at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, has had a busy 18 months. She joins then & now to discuss how knowledge about COVID-19 has shaped – and re-shaped – public health approaches throughout the course of the pandemic.

Duration:00:37:53

A Firsthand Account of a California Recall Election: A Conversation with Governor Gray Davis

9/2/2021
Gray Davis, the 37th Governor of the State of California, is uniquely positioned to comment on the current effort to recall Governor Gavin Newsom. He kicks off Season 2 of then & now by discussing his path into public service, his numerous legislative successes as governor, and his experience being recalled and replaced by Arnold Schwarzenegger. He also delves into the political and legal backdrop to the current recall effort and offers some important advice for dealing with adversity in...

Duration:00:51:32

Revisited - Political Polarization, Civility, and Deliberative Democracy: A Conversation with Carolyn Lukensmeyer

8/23/2021
Whether discussing COVID-19 vaccinations with different people, reading two different news sites, or merely glancing at any given Twitter feed, one might think that Americans across the country live in alternate universes. It is clear that political polarization has reached a boiling point. Dr. Carolyn Lukensmeyer, a nationally renowned expert in deliberative democracy and Executive Director Emerita of the National Institute for Civil Discourse, joins Then & Now producer Maia Ferdman to...

Duration:00:50:34

Revisited - How did Los Angeles become the “Homeless Capital” of the United States?

8/9/2021
UCLA researchers and graduate students Marques Vestal, Fernanda Jahn Verri, and Andrew Klein join Then & Now to discuss the Luskin Center for History and Policy's research report detailing the history of the homelessness crisis in Los Angeles County. They discuss how the last century of housing policy, racial dynamics, and policing practices all contributed to the crisis we find ourselves in today. This is the first episode in a series covering the report findings. Read the report, "The...

Duration:01:05:07

Revisited - How Endangered is the Right to Vote? A Conversation on the Past and Future of Voting Rights in the United States with Franita Tolson

7/26/2021
Months after the national election and despite numerous judicial decisions to the contrary, many Americans still believe the election was stolen from Donald Trump. In recent weeks various state legislatures have used the claim of voter fraud to propose new bills to change voting procedures, launching a new chapter in the long battle over the franchise in the United States. In this episode of "Then & Now," we discuss the history of voter suppression and the current state of play with election...

Duration:00:50:53

Revisited - The Banality of Evil and the Murder of George Floyd: A Conversation with Robin Kelley

7/12/2021
Political philosopher Hannah Arendt famously argued - in the case of SS officer Adolf Eichmann - that ordinary people can easily become complicit in evil acts as part of a larger system of injustice and inequality. In this special episode, we discuss the concept of "the banality of evil" with Robin Kelley, prominent scholar and professor of U.S. and African American History. As protests spread across the country over the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and so many...

Duration:00:48:55

Reimagining the American West: A Conversation with Autry Museum CEO Stephen Aron

6/29/2021
This week’s episode features Stephen Aron, outgoing UCLA historian and incoming CEO of the Autry Museum of the American West. Dr. Aron discussed the origins and persistence of the idea of the Western “frontier” in the American imagination, his approach to cultural “convergence” in the West, and his vision for the Autry Museum’s role in Los Angeles and the West today.

Duration:00:42:10

Fighting the First Wave: A Conversation on the Global Pandemic with Peter Baldwin

6/14/2021
As California lifts longtime public health restrictions and life in parts of the United States begin returning to a semblance of pre-pandemic normalcy, it is important to recall the unfolding crises of the past 15 months. In this episode, UCLA Historian Peter Baldwin, author of the recent book Fighting the First Wave: Why the Coronavirus was Tackled So Differently Across the Globe, looks back on the past year and offers intriguing historical insight into why some countries were more...

Duration:00:51:56

Déjà Vu All Over Again? Assessing the State of Affairs in Israel-Palestine with Three Leading Experts on Middle Eastern Affairs

5/26/2021
This special three-part episode of Then & Now features three experts in Middle East history and politics who examine multiple dimensions of the recent outbreak of violence in Israel and Palestine. Their incisive analysis provides listeners with a thorough overview of the historical context, political consequences, and potential impact on future peace in Israel-Palestine. The first segment features Hussein Ibish, senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington, who...

Duration:01:29:12

U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East: Changes in the Neoliberal Age

5/17/2021
UCLA undergraduate students Firyal Bawab and Mariam Aref Mahmoud and graduate student Phil Hoffman join Then & Now to discuss their forthcoming report on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. They track the historical effects of American “soft” or "non-military" foreign policy in the Middle East on regional governments and economies over time, including the consequences of neoliberalism in Egypt and Jordan. They also share their experiences conducting research with the Luskin Center for...

Duration:00:52:24

Extremism at UCLA: A Conversation with Student Researchers Talla Khelghati and Brandon Broukhim

5/3/2021
On January 6, 2021, hundreds of far-right protestors, many of them wearing white nationalist clothing and insignia, stormed the U.S. Capitol building. On February 16, UCLA student Christian Secor was arrested for his participation in the riot. In response to these developments, the Luskin Center for History and Policy released a report on white nationalism at UCLA titled “From Student Politics Capitol Insurrection: The Intensification of Extremism at UCLA and Beyond,” as a follow-up to prior...

Duration:00:52:34

The Complicated Legacy of Henry Kissinger: A Conversation with Thomas Schwartz

4/19/2021
Henry Kissinger is arguably one of the most important and controversial contemporary figures in U.S. foreign policy. As a former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor during the Nixon and Ford Administrations, a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and an accused war criminal, Kissinger is both revered and reviled. This week on Then & Now UCLA History Professor Kevin Kim interviews Vanderbilt University Professor Thomas Alan Schwartz on his recent book, Henry Kissinger and American...

Duration:00:38:59

The Path to Peace Runs Through Culture: A Conversation with André Azoulay, Senior Advisor to King Mohammed VI of Morocco

4/5/2021
From his childhood in Essaouira, Morocco, to his adolescence involved in Marxist politics, to his time as a successful banker in Paris, to his advocacy for peace and cross cultural understanding as senior advisor to two Moroccan kings, André Azoulay has lived an extraordinary life. He joins Then & Now in conversation with LCHP Director David Myers and Professor Aomar Boum (UCLA Department of Anthropology), to discuss his personal path, the importance of cultural connection and identity, his...

Duration:01:11:13

The Long History of Anti-Asian Hatred: A Conversation with Karen Umemoto and David Yoo

3/29/2021
Anti-Asian sentiment and violence has spiked dramatically over the last year. Most recently on March 16, a mass shooting in Atlanta, Georgia took the lives of eight people, six of whom were Asian women. UCLA Professors David Yoo and Karen Umemoto join this special episode of Then & Now to discuss this disturbing trend and situate it in the context of race and racism in American society. They discuss policies that have stigmatized and excluded Asian Americans, the development of the “AAPI”...

Duration:00:47:10

How Endangered is the Right to Vote? A Conversation on the Past and Future of Voting Rights in the United States with Franita Tolson

3/15/2021
Months after the national election and despite numerous judicial decisions to the contrary, many Americans still believe the election was stolen from Donald Trump. In recent weeks various state legislatures have used the claim of voter fraud to propose new bills to change voting procedures, launching a new chapter in the long battle over the franchise in the United States. In this episode of "Then & Now," we discuss the history of voter suppression and the current state of play with election...

Duration:00:50:23

​Is the University an Agent of Change? A Conversation with Historian Eddie Cole

3/1/2021
Higher education institutions in the United States can be seen as both bastions of liberalism and conservatism, as the realm of both radicals and establishmentarians. Eddie Cole, associate professor of higher education and organizational change at UCLA and author of The Campus Color Line: College Presidents and the Struggle for Black Freedom addresses this seeming contradiction. He discusses the dual nature of the university, as well as the role played by college presidents in moving their...

Duration:00:46:09

What is the role of a public historian?: A Conversation with Anthea Hartig

2/15/2021
In 2019, Anthea M. Hartig made headlines when she became the first woman director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, DC. Since then, she has been a fierce advocate for public history in the nation’s capital. Join us for this President's Day episode as we learn about how Hartig, a UCLA alumna, fell in love with history, developed a rich and challenging approach to the past, and sees history as a key to navigating the present.

Duration:00:58:51

Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness & Mental Health: A Conversation with Dr. Jonathan Sherin

2/1/2021
A recent LATimes investigation found that about 67% of the homeless population in Los Angeles County has either a mental illness or a substance abuse disorder. Yet, Dr. Jonathan Sherin wrote in a December op-ed, mental health policies are failing those who most need services. Dr. Sherin, the director of the LA County Department of Mental Health, joins Then & Now this week to discuss this challenge. He sits down with Dr. Kirsten Moore-Sheeley and Jessica Richards, two authors of LCHP’s...

Duration:00:37:36