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World War II Chronicles

Radio America

World War II Chronicles is a weekly look back to 'This Week in World War II, 75 Years Ago.' Originally produced in coordination with the National Archives to mark the 50th anniversary of the war, World War II Chronicles features original newsreel reports and archival footage to tell the story as it happened, week by week. Hosted by famed World War II newsreel anchor Ed Herlihy, World War II Chronicles is produced by the American Veterans Center.

World War II Chronicles is a weekly look back to 'This Week in World War II, 75 Years Ago.' Originally produced in coordination with the National Archives to mark the 50th anniversary of the war, World War II Chronicles features original newsreel reports and archival footage to tell the story as it happened, week by week. Hosted by famed World War II newsreel anchor Ed Herlihy, World War II Chronicles is produced by the American Veterans Center.
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United States

Networks:

Radio America

Description:

World War II Chronicles is a weekly look back to 'This Week in World War II, 75 Years Ago.' Originally produced in coordination with the National Archives to mark the 50th anniversary of the war, World War II Chronicles features original newsreel reports and archival footage to tell the story as it happened, week by week. Hosted by famed World War II newsreel anchor Ed Herlihy, World War II Chronicles is produced by the American Veterans Center.

Language:

English


Episodes

Episode 136: Buzz Bombs

7/10/2019
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On June 13, 1944, the German Air Force began launching one of the first guided missiles in history. In Britain, the bomb was commonly known as "the doodlebug" or the "buzz bomb," for the buzzing sound it made as it fell. The only way to combat the buzz bomb was to shoot it out of the sky with anti-aircraft guns or fighter planes.

Duration:00:04:22

Episode 135: The G.I. Bill of Rights

7/3/2019
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Congress passed the Serviceman's Readjustment Act in the Spring 1944 to aid veterans transitioning back home. Known as "The G.I. Bill of Rights," President Roosevelt signed it into law on June 22, 1944.

Duration:00:03:57

Episode 134: The Battle of the Philippine Sea

6/26/2019
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In preparation for invasion, the first bombing raids attacked the Marianas Islands on June 11, 1944. As soon as the bombing began, the Japanese fleet decided to attack the US carrier force, which was protecting the invasion of Saipan. On June 19, Japanese air & naval forces began their attack; it failed miserably. The two-day battle of the Philippine Sea saw a result similar to the Battle of Midway.

Duration:00:04:14

Episode 133: The Battle of the Marianas

6/19/2019
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In June 1944, the next targets for attack in the US Central Pacific campaign were the Marianas Islands. They were to be a staging area for a future invasion of Japan. Capturing the island of Saipan was the first objective.

Duration:00:04:20

Episode 132: D-DAY

6/12/2019
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As dawn broke on June 6, 1944, the Allied invasion force emerged from the mist along the coast of Normandy. Troops emerged along the mine-filled beaches of Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword. On Omaha, American casualties were especially heavy.

Duration:00:04:21

Episode 131: Allies Retake Rome & Launch D-Day Invasion

6/5/2019
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Since their breakout from the Anzio beaches in Italy, General Mark Clark's forces had been driving east. Instead of continuing in that direction, General Clark chose to move west on June 4, 1944, and enter Rome.

Duration:00:03:54

Episode 130: The B-29 Superfortress

5/29/2019
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In late April 1944, Gen. Henry "Hap" Arnold was commanding aircraft to make America's Air Force the mightiest in the world. The B-29 Superfortress was designed to be a global bomber, and around it was built an entire new Air Force. The 20th Air Force was enacted to carryout bombing operations specifically against Japan.

Duration:00:05:41

Episode 129: Destination, Rome!

5/22/2019
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The war of attrition in Italy continued during early 1944. After failed frontal assaults, the Allied commanders accepted the wisdom of a flanking movement. North African troops of the French Corps fought their way through seemingly impassable mountains, and by May 17, seized ground near German positions on Monte Cassino. Allied forces staged a breakout at Anzio on May 23.

Duration:00:04:24

Episode 128: The National Service Act

5/15/2019
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By the Spring of 1944, the number of Americans in uniform had severely strained the labor force. Millions of housewives, older children, and the elderly took on work, dropping unemployment to 1.2%. Yet there was a demand for even more workers.

Duration:00:03:57

Episode 127: The Liberation of Odessa

5/8/2019
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The Soviet offensive on the Eastern Front gained moment during the early months of 1944. In March, a sweeping offensive began in the direction of the Odessa-Lviv Railroad. The assault moved so swiftly, that by the end of March the Red Army had invaded Romania. In mid-April, the Soviets had recaptured the port city of Odessa.

Duration:00:03:19

Episode 126: The Black Market

5/1/2019
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The Black Market was just as much a problem on the home front as it was in Europe during WWII. On the home front, it was the take of the Office of Price Administration (OPA) to stamp it out.

Duration:00:03:05

Episode 125: MacArthur's Vow to Return

4/24/2019
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During the Spring of 1944, the Japanese - occupying the Dutch East Indies - anticipated an American attack from the east. However, the Japanese had little air cover and little resistance -- but they would hold out until August. Long before then, General MacArthur would prepare for his return to the Philippines.

Duration:00:04:38

Episode 124: America's Past Time During WWII

4/17/2019
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In early 1944, the sixteen major league baseball teams began spring training. By the time the season began in April, 60% of the starting players in 1941 were in the Armed Forces. With so many players drafted, the league began to fill their teams with teenagers and middle-aged men.

Duration:00:02:58

Episode 123: The Battle of Burma

4/10/2019
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The Japanese offensive on the Burma-India front had reached Kohima and Imphal on April 6, 1944. A quick assemblage of British and Indian troops held out against a Japanese force six times the size, in bitter hand-to-hand combat.

Duration:00:03:59

Episode 122: The Test of Neutrality

4/3/2019
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To maintain neutrality during WWII was to court the wrath of belligerents on both sides. Only six nations in Europe remained neutral, and it was constantly tested. In April 1944, the Swiss were outraged when US planes mistakingly bombed a Swiss town.

Duration:00:04:01

Episode 121: Air Warfare Climax

3/27/2019
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During March of 1944, Allied Air Forces were engaged in massive dogfights over Axis territory. American pilots consciously attacked special targets to lure the Luftwaffe into battle.

Duration:00:04:18

Episode 120: Attacks on U.S. Air Fields

3/20/2019
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Since American forces landed on the island of Bougainville in November 1943, they protected their newly won air fields which would enable air strikes. By early 1944, advances towards Rabaul became more intense and the Japanese realized they needed to relieve the pressure. They prepared to attack American positions during the first week in March.

Duration:00:06:00

Episode 119: The U.S. Joins the Battle of Berlin

3/13/2019
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Until March 4, 1944, the lack of long-range fighter escort prohibited U.S. participation in bombing raids over Berlin. Over the next week, massive squadrons of bombers swarmed over the German capital. American bombing over Berlin would continue to cripple German forces.

Duration:00:05:30

Episode 118: Occupation of the Admiralty Islands

3/6/2019
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During February 1944, officers under General MacArthur's command were counseling him to launch a reconnaissance attack against the Admiralty Islands. Their occupation would complete the encirclement against the Japanese stronghold at Rabaul. MacArthur ordered an invasion for February 29, 1944.

Duration:00:05:59

Episode 117: The LST

2/27/2019
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The Landing Ship Tank, known as the 'LST' served as the backbone of Allied landings in the Pacific and Italy throughout early 1944. The first LST was completed in December of 1942, and these vessels became critical ships in warfare over the next year. They could obtain a remarkable amount of damage and still survive.

Duration:00:06:51