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Making Contact

NRP

Making Contact, is an award-winning 29-minute weekly magazine/documentary-style public affairs program heard on 140 radio stations.

Making Contact, is an award-winning 29-minute weekly magazine/documentary-style public affairs program heard on 140 radio stations.
More Information

Location:

Oakland, CA

Networks:

NRP

Description:

Making Contact, is an award-winning 29-minute weekly magazine/documentary-style public affairs program heard on 140 radio stations.

Language:

English

Contact:

1714 Franklin Street #100-251 Oakland, CA 94612 510-251-1332


Episodes

Your Home, Your Right… or My Business?

6/20/2018
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The stage is set for a battle between two world-views. Is housing a human right, or a commodity? And where on that continuum is California’s common ground? This week, we look at the fight over rent control, and police policies that affect the homeless.

Duration:00:28:55

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

6/13/2018
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Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools is an examination of the experiences of black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged "by teachers, administrators, and the justice system" and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish.

Duration:00:29:10

The Cost of Deportations

6/6/2018
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This week, Making Contact looks at The Cost of Deportations through the lens of one Central American nation that sends migrants north— Guatemala. Will Guatemala and the other countries these migrants left be prepared for an influx of returnees?

Duration:00:29:19

Finding Home: Displacement and Homelessness from Cape Town to California (Encore)

5/30/2018
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On this edition of Making Contact we go from Cape Town, South Africa to Los Angeles and Oakland, California— three cities grappling with evictions, displacement, and homelessness.

Duration:00:29:13

Korea: The Ghosts of the Gwangju Uprising (ENCORE)

5/23/2018
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On May 18, 1980, the people of Gwangju, South Korea rose up for reunification and an end to U.S.-backed military dictatorships.Their actions changed the course of Korean history. We hear from survivors of the Gwangju Uprising about how they took on the tasks of history and the lesson they carry.

Duration:00:29:13

She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry – The Personal Is Political

5/16/2018
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For this edition of Making Contact, we’ll present the documentary, “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry,” a reflection on the rise of the women’s liberation movement in the United States, between 1966 and 1971. She’s Beautiful explores the emergence of political thought that challenged systems of patriarchy.

Duration:00:29:08

SPECIAL FOR MOTHER’S DAY-Mothering: Love on the Front Lines

5/9/2018
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For Mother's Day: we bring you a discussion by women of color writers and poets who contributed to the anthology, Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Front Lines. You'll also hear about a recent investigation into Black maternal and infant mortality.

Duration:00:29:08

Protecting People and Water in Mexico City

5/2/2018
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Fresh water is one of our most precious natural resources. This week contributor Maria Doerr looks at what's being done to protect the watersheds of Mexico City-- natural water systems that provide water to one of the largest metropolises in the world.

Duration:00:28:55

Specters of Attica: Reflections from Inside a Michigan Prison Strike

4/25/2018
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On the 45th anniversary of the Attica prison uprising, hundreds imprisoned inside Michigan’s Kinross Correctional Facility refused to report to work or lock down in their barracks. Instead, they joined the largest prisoner labor strike in U.S. history.

Duration:00:29:08

Daze of Justice

4/18/2018
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Daze of Justice is the story of trailblazing Cambodian-American women who break decades of silence, abandoning the security of their American homes on a journey back into Cambodia's killing fields, as witnesses determined to resurrect the memory of their loved ones before the UN Special Tribunal prosecuting the Khmer Rouge.

Duration:00:29:13

The Nakba, the Naksa, and the Future of Palestine (ENCORE)

4/11/2018
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In 1948, Zionist militias expelled over 700,000 Palestinians from their villages and towns. The event, and the ongoing destruction and occupation of Palestine are referred to as the Nakba " the catastrophe. How did the events of 1948 shape Palestine and its diaspora? And generations later, how are Palestinians fighting to return home?

Duration:00:29:08

A Dream Remembered?: Martin Luther King Jr and the Grassroots Civil Rights Movement (ENCORE)

4/4/2018
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Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated 50 years ago, and is widely remembered for his speech, ‘I Have a Dream.’ Journalist Gary Younge analyzes the King’s speech, highlighting the importance of remembering the entirety of King’s message and evolution as a critical activist.

Duration:00:29:14

The Seekers, Pt. 1: Freedom from Violence

3/28/2018
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The Seekers, is the first in a two-part documentary series that examines the experiences of Central American migrants seeking asylum in the US. In this episode, we look at women fleeing violence from Guatemala.

Duration:00:28:55

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, “When They Call You A Terrorist”

3/20/2018
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Patrisse Khan-Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter reflections on humanity, the end of policing and her new book, WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir.

Duration:00:29:13

The Spirit of Vietnam Is Stronger Than U.S. Bombs

3/14/2018
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Fifty years ago, the Vietnamese Liberation Front inspired people of color around the world who were building movements for self-determination. Today, we hear from people who were organizing in the Spirit of Viet Nam fifty years ago, and those who are building on that work today.

Duration:00:29:08

Guardians of the Amazon Rainforest - Women Rising Radio #35

3/7/2018
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Gloria Ushigua and Aura Tegria, two legendary indigenous heroines of the Amazon rainforest, tell us about their activism to keep big oil and other exploitative industries off their ancestral territories, and out of the Amazon. They describe their struggles to guard and conserve their own cultures, which depend on the health and safety of the Amazon.

Duration:00:28:55

Mrs. Hamer Echoes (Encore)

2/28/2018
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Civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, spoke words that are all too relevant today. In this episode, we hear archival recordings and excerpts from a new film featuring Fannie Lou Hamer. You’ll hear about the context of her life, and the lives of other sharecroppers in Mississippi.

Duration:00:29:12

I Am Not Your Negro: James Baldwin (Encore)

2/21/2018
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I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond.

Duration:00:29:12

The End of Policing, Alex Vitale

2/14/2018
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Producer Robert Raymond interviews Alex Vitale, author of The End of Policing--a critical examination on the history of the police, and the police’s evolution as a tool for social control that exacerbates race and class divisions.

Duration:00:28:55

Ghosts of the Korean War: Stop THAAD (Encore)

2/7/2018
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We head to Soseongri, a small village nestled in the mountains of Seongju County. There, grandmas and grandpas in the 70s, 80s, and 90s are organizing daily protests and blockades to stop THAAD. THAAD is part of a missile defense system that gives the U.S. the ability to carry out a nuclear first strike.

Duration:00:29:46