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This Way Up

RNZ New Zealand

This Way Up is a weekly two-hour show that explores the things we use and consume.

This Way Up is a weekly two-hour show that explores the things we use and consume.
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Location:

Wellington, New Zealand

Description:

This Way Up is a weekly two-hour show that explores the things we use and consume.

Twitter:

@upthisway

Language:

English


Episodes

This Way Up: seismic stories

7/6/2018
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For This Way Up's last shows, presenter Simon Morton and longtime producer Richard Scott have trawled through the archives of 600 shows recorded over the past (nearly) 13 years. This week, they mark the major seismic events that occurred during their time on the airwaves; the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes.

Duration:00:48:45

This Way Up's DIY dimensions: chickens, bees and sourdough

6/29/2018
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With This Way Up's last show on Saturday 7 July, presenter Simon Morton and longtime producer Richard Scott have trawled through the archives of 600 shows recorded over the past (nearly) 13 years. This week, some highlights of all the DIY stuff we've done along the way...the sourdough, the bees, and of course those chickens! Next week, recording some of the major seismic events that have punctuated some of This Way Up's time on the airwaves. Please note from Saturday 14 July This Way Up...

Duration:00:48:45

This Way Up archive: The People

6/22/2018
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With This Way Up's last show on Saturday 7 July, presenter Simon Morton and longtime producer Richard Scott have trawled through the archives of 600 shows recorded over the past (nearly) 13 years. This week, the people and the characters they've met along the way; from scambaiters, to roadkill counters, to mountain man Derek who's made cleaning up other people's rubbish his life's work. One of the most enjoyable parts of the job has been getting out and about and meeting you, the people...

Duration:00:48:46

How natural is your wine?

6/15/2018
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There's a battle going on in the world of wine. In one corner the $250 billion dollar global wine industry using the latest scientific production methods and agricultural tools to produce consistent, highly engineered wines that are often built to please the wine critics' palate. In the other corner are devotees of so-called 'natural' wines: wines that are ethically produced and made without pesticides, chemicals or preservatives. These wines tend to be a bit more fragrant and funky,...

Duration:00:12:07

BITS+BYTES: a hi tech World Cup

6/15/2018
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In BITS+BYTES with Peter Griffin and Emily Wang, a big reform of European privacy laws that critics worry could have a chilling effect on free speech on the internet. Plus the FIFA World Cup has kicked off, so how hi tech is the tournament? And we review the latest music streaming service, YouTube Music.

Duration:00:20:47

China's recycling ban: where will your rubbish go?

6/15/2018
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First up this week, why has China stopped taking many of our recycled plastics? Adam Minter covers Asia for Bloomberg and is a man obsesed with rubbish, junkyards and the huge economies that underpin the recycling industry.

Duration:00:13:23

This Way Up for Saturday 16 June 2018

6/15/2018
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After China's restrictions, where's your recycling going to go now? BITS+BYTES: hi tech World Cup and how natural is your wine?

Duration:00:48:46

Bits+Bytes: another Facebook data breach?

6/8/2018
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Bits and Bytes with Peter Griffin, and this week another big data breach involving Facebook, as the New York Times reports that it's been allowing dozens of handset makers (including Nokia, Sony Ericsson and Apple) to access personal information about its users. In other news, why has Microsoft just paid US$7.5 billion for GitHub, an online community of computer coders and web developers with 28 million users that's become the world's largest library of computer code? Plus a listener...

Duration:00:28:14

Walking your way to better health?

6/8/2018
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When you next go for a walk or a tramp, it might pay to pick up the pace a bit! A study of just over 50,000 walkers living in Britain has shown the health benefits of walking at a higher speed. Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the Charles Perkins Centre and the School of Public Health at the University of Sydney has just published the results in the British Journal of Sports Medicine and we ask him to explain the key findings.

Duration:00:16:30

This Way Up for Saturday 9 June 2018

6/8/2018
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Walk your way to better health, and another Facebook data breach?

Duration:00:48:40

Apple TV: will Apple start making its own shows?

6/1/2018
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Bits and Bytes with Peter Griffin, helping you navigate the world of tech and analysing the latest news from the digital world. For years now there's been rumours that Apple will launch its own video streaming service to take on Amazon and Netflix. Now it's being reported that it's hired a bunch of TV execs and is commissioning its own content. Plus Apple Music's rumoured to be launching a global publishing arm to sign artists direct. In other news, influential tech analyst Mary Meeker...

Duration:00:24:19

Eyebrows: why we have them

6/1/2018
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Why do we have eyebrows? One theory is that they stop sweat getting in our eyes, but Penny Spikins and her colleagues at York University in England think that there might be something else going on.

Duration:00:06:47

Assessing gut health with a sensor you swallow

6/1/2018
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With conditions like depression, Celiac disease, cancer and obesity now being linked to our gut health, a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed an edible gut sensor. This sensor is swallowed and measures chemicals in the gastro-intestinal tract that can be linked to particular health issues, with the results transmitted to a smartphone app. We speak to one of the team behind this sensor, Mark Mimee of MIT.

Duration:00:11:18

Tagging tech: Graffiti detection in real time

6/1/2018
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Max Voskob uses a mix of wireless sensors, cameras, and machine learning to detect graffiti and tagging incidents in real time. He shows us how the system works in Auckland.

Duration:00:08:44

This Way Up for Saturday 2 June 2018

6/1/2018
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Graffiti detection in real time, assessing gut health with swallowed sensors, eyebrows: why you have them, and will Apple start making its own shows?

Duration:00:48:45

DNA is not destiny

5/25/2018
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The market for consumer DNA testing is booming, with an estimated 1 billion people expected to have their genomes sequenced by 2025. But how readily should we accept our genetic 'fate'? Well not so much, according to Steven Heine. He's a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver who in his book 'DNA is Not Destiny: The Remarkable, Completely Misunderstood Relationship Between You and Your Genes' (Norton) argues that we've been over sold and over promised...

Duration:00:12:37

Developing the next generation of non-addictive painkillers

5/25/2018
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A new way to measure pain could help break our dependence on addiction forming opioid painkilling drugs. Before a drug ever gets to a clinical trial on humans, researchers have to do extensive animal trials: but how can you prove a painkiller is working on a mouse or a rat? David Roberson of Blue Therapeutics thinks he has found an answer using a touch screen that measures an animal's paw prints to give valuable insights into how they are really feeling.

Duration:00:08:30

Recycling polystyrene

5/25/2018
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Polystyrene is the protective packaging material that encases many parts of our consumer lives. Packed safely and soundly within it, everything from TVs, ovens, computers and even meat arrive safely at our doors protected for our use. But it's a problematic byproduct of modern life: in many places around New Zealand you can't recycle it, so it has to be dumped at the tip, or broken into smaller pieces and smuggled into rubbish bags destined for landfill. Well perhaps no longer! We meet a...

Duration:00:18:12

This Way Up for Saturday 26 May 2018

5/25/2018
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Recycling polystyrene, developing the next generation of non-addictive painkillers, low wage jobs in the digital economy, and are consumer genetic tests worth it?

Duration:00:48:46

Better bowel cancer testing?

5/18/2018
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A blood test for detecting bowel cancer is being developed right here in New Zealand using genetic information produced by tumours, and the hope is that this could be used for earlier detection and better treatments for the disease. Dr Kirsty Danielson, from the University of Otago, Wellington, has just been awarded a Health Research Council grant to develop a way to detect chemicals in the blood that are linked to the presence of cancerous tumours.

Duration:00:11:38