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After the Fact

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Join experts from The Pew Charitable Trusts and other special guests for the story behind the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges. Whether it’s data on the financial plight of American families or research on how to protect the environment, you’ll hear evidence-based—and nonpartisan—conversations as we go after the facts that can inform, enlighten, and expand your worldview.

Join experts from The Pew Charitable Trusts and other special guests for the story behind the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges. Whether it’s data on the financial plight of American families or research on how to protect the environment, you’ll hear evidence-based—and nonpartisan—conversations as we go after the facts that can inform, enlighten, and expand your worldview.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Join experts from The Pew Charitable Trusts and other special guests for the story behind the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges. Whether it’s data on the financial plight of American families or research on how to protect the environment, you’ll hear evidence-based—and nonpartisan—conversations as we go after the facts that can inform, enlighten, and expand your worldview.

Language:

English


Episodes

Scientists at Work: Teaching Robots to Think

4/12/2019
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Stat: 20 percent. The share of Americans who find the concept of machines doing most human jobs in the future extremely realistic. Story: Will robots take our jobs? They’ll need a key human skill first—the ability to think. To find out just how near such a future is, we visited Ashley J. Llorens, chief of the Intelligent Systems Center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. There, researchers are bridging the gap between machines programmed by humans and those that can...

Duration:00:13:40

Who Is Generation Z?

3/29/2019
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Stat: 48%—Almost half the members of Generation Z—age 22 or younger—are racial or ethnic minorities. Story: Step aside, Millennials. There’s a new, younger group out there: Generation Z, which includes anyone born after 1996. To learn more about this generation, we sat down with Kim Parker, director of social trends research at the Pew Research Center. Listen in to hear about Gen Z’s social, cultural, and political inclinations, and what this might mean for the future.

Duration:00:13:27

Water, Water, Not Everywhere

3/15/2019
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Stat: 844 million. The amount of people worldwide who lack even a basic drinking-water service, according to the World Health Organization. Story: For many of us, it can be easy to take water for granted. Turn on the tap and it’s there. But today, the world faces a tipping point, with water security—having sufficient access to safe water for our daily lives—at risk. Listen in as our guest, Sandra Postel, discusses the challenges and shares options for fixing our broken water cycle.

Duration:00:15:50

Scientists at Work: Why Are Giraffes Dying?

3/1/2019
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Stat: 40%—Across Africa, the number of giraffes has declined by 40 percent since 1979. Story: Giraffes are dying, and experts are trying to figure out why. Host Dan LeDuc speaks to two giraffe experts, ecologist David O’Connor and researcher Jenna Stacy-Dawes of the San Diego Zoo, who are trying to learn more about these mysterious animals and help giraffes rebound.

Duration:00:15:44

The Grand Canyon National Park Turns 100

2/15/2019
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Stat: 1919—the year President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill establishing the Grand Canyon as a national park. Story: The Grand Canyon was dedicated as a national park 100 years ago. This anniversary commemorates the canyon’s legacy, but it has been around longer than that—at least 6 million years. Our host explores the beauty of this natural wonder with Wayne Ranney, a geologist who has spent his career studying the canyon. Listen in for a historical journey through this iconic landscape.

Duration:00:14:57

Living Longer: Our 100-Year Life

2/1/2019
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Stat: 100. More than half of children born in developed countries today will reach the age of 100. Story: If you knew you would live to 100, what would you do differently? Increasing longevity will expand and shift the traditional phases of life, according to London Business School professor Andrew Scott. In his conversation with host Dan LeDuc, he describes the challenges and opportunities facing individuals and society as life expectancy continues to rise.

Duration:00:18:57

Looks Can Be Deceiving: Deepfakes

1/18/2019
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Stat: 57 percent of social media news consumers expect what they see there to be largely inaccurate. Story: The rise of deepfakes—realistic fake videos made with artificial intelligence software—is beginning to make sorting fact from fiction even harder. In an interview with Dartmouth Professor Hany Farid, a digital forensics expert who advises governments and the media on how to meet this growing threat, we discuss the implications for people and societies when we can’t necessarily believe...

Duration:00:19:42

The American Dream: Does Your Zip Code Determine Your Destiny?

1/4/2019
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Stat: 50. The percentage of American children today who will grow up to earn more than their parents did. Story: That’s down from over 90 percent for children born in the 1940s and its says a lot about the current state of the American Dream. John Friedman, who’s a leader of Opportunity Insights which is working to help people get out of poverty, says the opportunity to move up the economic ladder depends a lot on where you live and even who your kindergarten teacher was. He speaks with...

Duration:00:19:49

The Power (and Peril?) of New Technologies

12/21/2018
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Stat: Four in 10 Americans say technology has improved their lives most in the past 50 years. Story: To end 2018, we look ahead at the promise of new technologies, which also bring challenges for societies. To understand the issues, we speak to Arati Prabhakar, former director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. From artificial intelligence to neurotechnology, she notes the “dazzling” new capabilities emerging and the thorny considerations they bring.

Duration:00:14:30

Scientists at Work: The Secret Life of Manatees

12/7/2018
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Stat: 21. The number of African countries where manatees live. Story: If you’ve ever seen a manatee, chances are you were in Florida, where these aquatic relatives of the elephant may have poked their faces above the water’s surface to get a look at you. But this episode’s guest studies manatees few have ever seen—the African species that live in remote, murky waters. Host Dan LeDuc talks to 2017 Pew marine fellow Lucy Keith-Diagne about what makes these creatures so fascinating—and the...

Duration:00:18:24

What Religious Type Are You?

11/21/2018
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Stat: 39 percent. That’s how many Americans say they are highly religious. Story: When asked about their religion, most Americans identify with a traditional faith: Christianity, Judaism, Islam. But the Pew Research Center recently looked beyond familiar classifications and analyzed patterns of American beliefs and behaviors across many faiths. Host Dan LeDuc talks with one of the authors of this analysis, Rich Morin, about how the researchers created this religious typology and what each...

Duration:00:17:09

From Idea to Art: Exploring the Creative Process

11/9/2018
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Stat: $764 billion. That’s how much the arts contribute to the U.S. economy each year. Story: The creative process for artists can seem mysterious—what sparks an artist’s initial idea and how does that idea become reality? Host Dan LeDuc talks to Pew Arts Fellow, and Pulitzer Prize- and Grammy Award-winning classical composer Jennifer Higdon about her creative process, and also interviews Paula Marincola from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage about supporting the arts.

Duration:00:23:41

Midterm Outlook: What’s on the Minds of Voters?

10/26/2018
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Stat: 61 percent. That’s how many voters say they’re enthusiastic about voting in November. Story: Traditionally, voters don’t flock to the polls for the midterm elections. But this year, the Pew Research Center has found that voters are more enthusiastic about voting than at any point during midterms in the past two decades. Why is that and what’s on voters’ minds? In this episode, Dan LeDuc talks with the center’s director of political research, Carroll Doherty, who will share his...

Duration:00:15:53

A World in Motion: Global Demographics Explained—Part 2

10/19/2018
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Stat: 7 out of 10 babies born in London have at least one parent who wasn’t. Story: London is on track to exceed 9 million people in three years and most of the new babies there have at least one foreign-born parent. One area in particular is emblematic of these changing world demographics: Brixton. Host Dan LeDuc went for a walk there with Ben Rogers and Denean Rowe from the Centre for London to see up close how it’s evolving from a quintessential South London neighborhood into a dense,...

Duration:00:14:21

A World in Motion: Global Demographics Explained-Part 1

10/12/2018
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Stat: 70 percent. That’s how many children now born in London have at least one foreign-born parent. Story: In many ways, the metropolis of London is a microcosm of what’s happening around the globe. People move across borders and flock to urban centers, causing their newfound homes to evolve and adapt. How are global demographic trends affecting and changing our world? To learn, host Dan LeDuc talks with Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and demography research at the Pew...

Duration:00:12:37

Dave Ramsey Talks American Debt

9/28/2018
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Stat: 7 in 10. That’s how many Americans say that debt is a necessity, even though they prefer not to have it. Story: Ten years after the global financial crisis, we explore Americans’ relationship with debt, and interview Dave Ramsey, the host of his own syndicated radio show, who talks to some 13 million listeners each week about how they can overcome financial setbacks and build wealth. Ramsey shares his thoughts about why so many Americans are in debt today, why they’re not stuck, and...

Duration:00:17:01

Scientists at Work: Craig Mello on the Mysteries of Genetic Code

9/14/2018
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Stat: Four. That’s how many letters in the DNA alphabet make up every living thing. Story: How does genetic information transmit across generations? While trying to find out, scientists Craig Mello and Andrew Fire quite by accident made a discovery in 1998 that would earn them a Nobel Prize—and pave the way for the first drug to take on harmful genes. Pew’s Dan LeDuc talks with Mello about science’s surprises. Additional audio licensed for use by the Nobel Foundation. All rights reserved....

Duration:00:15:59

The Future of Fish and Chips

9/7/2018
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Stat: North Atlantic cod have nearly tripled since 2006 to 118,000 tons. Summary: Overfishing has strained most global fish stocks. But the European Union has made progress bringing back one popular species: North Atlantic cod. The flaky white fish—a British staple when battered and served with chips—has rebounded after plummeting to critically low levels in the late 2000s. In this episode, we go to one of London’s oldest fish and chips restaurants and learn how quotas can be used to help...

Duration:00:14:06

Scientists at Work: Ira Flatow Talks Science

8/24/2018
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Stat: 44 percent. The percentage of Americans who think the public doesn’t know enough about science to understand new findings in the news. Story: Ira Flatow, the host of “Science Friday,” has been with National Public Radio since it went on the air in 1970. Although he knows the public loves science, he’s worried that most people don’t know how the scientific process works. Pew’s Dan LeDuc talks to him about why critical thinking is crucial, who asks the best questions, and how science...

Duration:00:12:58

The Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance

8/10/2018
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Stat: At least 2 million Americans get antibiotic-resistant infections each year. Story: Nearly a century after Alexander Fleming’s discovery of penicillin, bacteria continue to develop the ability to defeat antibiotics. Doctors worldwide are concerned about the spread of superbugs that are resistant to all antibiotics. Host Dan LeDuc visits Fleming’s London lab for some history and talks with Pew’s Allan Coukell about current efforts to reduce unnecessary use of these drugs and encourage...

Duration:00:15:19