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After the Fact

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Join experts from The Pew Charitable Trusts and other special guests for the story behind the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges. Whether it’s data on the financial plight of American families or research on how to protect the environment, you’ll hear evidence-based—and nonpartisan—conversations as we go after the facts that can inform, enlighten, and expand your worldview.

Join experts from The Pew Charitable Trusts and other special guests for the story behind the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges. Whether it’s data on the financial plight of American families or research on how to protect the environment, you’ll hear evidence-based—and nonpartisan—conversations as we go after the facts that can inform, enlighten, and expand your worldview.
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United States

Description:

Join experts from The Pew Charitable Trusts and other special guests for the story behind the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges. Whether it’s data on the financial plight of American families or research on how to protect the environment, you’ll hear evidence-based—and nonpartisan—conversations as we go after the facts that can inform, enlighten, and expand your worldview.

Language:

English


Episodes

From Idea to Art: Exploring the Creative Process

11/9/2018
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Stat: $764 billion. That’s how much the arts contribute to the U.S. economy each year. Story: The creative process for artists can seem mysterious—what sparks an artist’s initial idea and how does that idea become reality? Host Dan LeDuc talks to Pew Arts Fellow, and Pulitzer Prize- and Grammy Award-winning classical composer Jennifer Higdon about her creative process, and also interviews Paula Marincola from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage about supporting the arts.

Duration:00:23:41

Midterm Outlook: What’s on the Minds of Voters?

10/26/2018
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Stat: 61 percent. That’s how many voters say they’re enthusiastic about voting in November. Story: Traditionally, voters don’t flock to the polls for the midterm elections. But this year, the Pew Research Center has found that voters are more enthusiastic about voting than at any point during midterms in the past two decades. Why is that and what’s on voters’ minds? In this episode, Dan LeDuc talks with the center’s director of political research, Carroll Doherty, who will share his...

Duration:00:15:53

A World in Motion: Global Demographics Explained—Part 2

10/19/2018
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Stat: 7 out of 10 babies born in London have at least one parent who wasn’t. Story: London is on track to exceed 9 million people in three years and most of the new babies there have at least one foreign-born parent. One area in particular is emblematic of these changing world demographics: Brixton. Host Dan LeDuc went for a walk there with Ben Rogers and Denean Rowe from the Centre for London to see up close how it’s evolving from a quintessential South London neighborhood into a dense,...

Duration:00:14:21

A World in Motion: Global Demographics Explained-Part 1

10/12/2018
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Stat: 70 percent. That’s how many children now born in London have at least one foreign-born parent. Story: In many ways, the metropolis of London is a microcosm of what’s happening around the globe. People move across borders and flock to urban centers, causing their newfound homes to evolve and adapt. How are global demographic trends affecting and changing our world? To learn, host Dan LeDuc talks with Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and demography research at the Pew...

Duration:00:12:37

Dave Ramsey Talks American Debt

9/28/2018
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Stat: 7 in 10. That’s how many Americans say that debt is a necessity, even though they prefer not to have it. Story: Ten years after the global financial crisis, we explore Americans’ relationship with debt, and interview Dave Ramsey, the host of his own syndicated radio show, who talks to some 13 million listeners each week about how they can overcome financial setbacks and build wealth. Ramsey shares his thoughts about why so many Americans are in debt today, why they’re not stuck, and...

Duration:00:17:01

Scientists at Work: Craig Mello on the Mysteries of Genetic Code

9/14/2018
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Stat: Four. That’s how many letters in the DNA alphabet make up every living thing. Story: How does genetic information transmit across generations? While trying to find out, scientists Craig Mello and Andrew Fire quite by accident made a discovery in 1998 that would earn them a Nobel Prize—and pave the way for the first drug to take on harmful genes. Pew’s Dan LeDuc talks with Mello about science’s surprises. Additional audio licensed for use by the Nobel Foundation. All rights reserved....

Duration:00:15:59

The Future of Fish and Chips

9/7/2018
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Stat: North Atlantic cod have nearly tripled since 2006 to 118,000 tons. Summary: Overfishing has strained most global fish stocks. But the European Union has made progress bringing back one popular species: North Atlantic cod. The flaky white fish—a British staple when battered and served with chips—has rebounded after plummeting to critically low levels in the late 2000s. In this episode, we go to one of London’s oldest fish and chips restaurants and learn how quotas can be used to help...

Duration:00:14:06

Scientists at Work: Ira Flatow Talks Science

8/24/2018
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Stat: 44 percent. The percentage of Americans who think the public doesn’t know enough about science to understand new findings in the news. Story: Ira Flatow, the host of “Science Friday,” has been with National Public Radio since it went on the air in 1970. Although he knows the public loves science, he’s worried that most people don’t know how the scientific process works. Pew’s Dan LeDuc talks to him about why critical thinking is crucial, who asks the best questions, and how science...

Duration:00:12:58

The Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance

8/10/2018
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Stat: At least 2 million Americans get antibiotic-resistant infections each year. Story: Nearly a century after Alexander Fleming’s discovery of penicillin, bacteria continue to develop the ability to defeat antibiotics. Doctors worldwide are concerned about the spread of superbugs that are resistant to all antibiotics. Host Dan LeDuc visits Fleming’s London lab for some history and talks with Pew’s Allan Coukell about current efforts to reduce unnecessary use of these drugs and encourage...

Duration:00:15:19

Event Rebroadcast: U.S. Senator Susan Collins on Addressing Rising Drug Prices

8/3/2018
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Stat: $477 billion. That’s the amount spent on prescription drugs in the United States last year, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. Story: Skyrocketing prescription drug prices have long troubled U.S. Senator Susan Collins of Maine, who has championed bipartisan legislation to give consumers more affordable choices. In this rebroadcast of a Pew event, she discusses what can be done to manage drug costs and ensure that Americans get the medicine they need.

Duration:00:38:50

Save the Sharks

7/23/2018
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Stat: At least 63 million sharks are taken from the ocean every year. Story: And that’s the low estimate; others range as high was 273 million. That worldwide catch—for shark fins and increasingly for their meat—is threatening some species with extinction. In this episode, host Dan LeDuc talks with two unlikely advocates for protecting sharks: South African Paralympian Achmat Hassiem and Pew’s Debbie Salamone. Both have been bitten by sharks but have turned their experiences into...

Duration:00:22:15

What Is the Blue Economy?

7/13/2018
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Stat: The ocean generates $2.5 trillion of economic benefits around the world each year. Story: Fisheries, tourism, and shipping are some of the ways we quantify the monetary value of the ocean—but it also drives weather patterns and provides more than 1 billion people with their primary source of protein. As the ocean faces increasing environmental stresses, what would an economic approach mean for conservation efforts? We explore the issue with a fishing family in Florida and Pew’s Tom...

Duration:00:22:28

Our Flag Is Still There: A Visit to the Star-Spangled Banner

6/29/2018
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Stat: The flag that inspired our national anthem has 15 stars and stripes. Story: It flew over Fort McHenry in the Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812. And after the fight, it was what Francis Scott Key was looking for when he asked, “Oh say does that star-spangled banner yet wave.” It was, and it continues to inspire Americans today in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington. Host Dan LeDuc went there to talk to curator Jennifer Jones about...

Duration:00:13:26

Event Rebroadcast: The Southern Ocean—Where Sport, Diplomacy, and Marine Protected Areas Meet

6/15/2018
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Stat: Antarctica is home to more than 9,000 species found nowhere else on Earth. Story: They include Adélie and emperor penguins that depend on the nutrient-rich waters that surround the continent. In 2016, 24 countries and the European Union created the world’s largest marine protected area—encompassing 1.9 million square miles—in the Ross Sea. In this rebroadcast of a Pew event, the former president of Costa Rica and other ocean conservationists discuss the need to give other Antarctic...

Duration:00:41:40

Scientists at Work: 'The Jane Goodall of Penguins'

6/8/2018
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Stat: The penguin population in Punta Tombo, Argentina, has declined by 43 percent since 1987. Story: Not all of those birds are dying: Many are relocating to areas with more prey—a move aided by their ability to swim 170 kilometers a day—and 200,000 breeding pairs remain in Punta Tombo. But expert Dee Boersma, known as the Jane Goodall of penguins, says the decline may foretell worrying trends in the ecosystem. Host Dan LeDuc sits down with Boersma, and hears from a few of the penguins, to...

Duration:00:17:44

Event Rebroadcast: How Today's Generations are Changing the World

6/1/2018
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Stat: By midcentury, there will be 2 billion elderly people in the world—and 2 billion young Story: For the first time there will be as many of each group —and together they’ll account for more than 40 percent of the world’s population. This will have deep implications for the labor supply, family structures and finances, demands on health and welfare services, housing, and more. In this episode, we hear a rebroadcast of a Pew event in London: “How Today’s Generations Are Changing the...

Duration:00:44:17

Dental Care Gaps in America

5/25/2018
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Stat: 63 million Americans, many of them children, live in areas with a shortage of dental care. Story: To help alleviate this, a new kind of dental provider is being created: dental therapists, who are much like physician assistants in a medical office. In this episode host Dan LeDuc heads to Minnesota to join one of them, Christy Jo Fogarty, as she travels the state to bring dental care to children, many of whom have never been to a dentist before.

Duration:00:14:02

Finding Facts

5/11/2018
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Stat: 64 percent of Americans say fake news is causing confusion over basic facts, according to the Pew Research Center. Story: It’s becoming increasingly more difficult to sort fact from fiction in this digital age. In this episode, we talk to Alan Miller, who founded the News Literacy Project—an educational, nonpartisan nonprofit organization that is helping people determine what information to trust and share.

Duration:00:15:08

Serve the Country, Save the Parks

4/24/2018
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More than a third of America’s national parks are battlefields, cemeteries, and other sites that honor our military veterans. But those 156 landmarks are awaiting $6 billion in needed repairs—accounting for nearly half of the National Park Service’s $11.6 billion maintenance backlog. Host Dan LeDuc talks with two former service members about the peace, pride, and purpose they find at their favorite NPS sites, and why more funding is needed to restore America’s national parks.

Duration:00:09:48

The Value of Non-partisanship

4/9/2018
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With political discourse at a stalemate, we traveled to Middle America to find some middle ground. Former Representative Lee Hamilton (D) and former Senator Richard Lugar (R) represented Indiana for a combined 70 years and always kept talking to each other. They say the rest of us can keep it civil, too. We also talk with Pew President and CEO Rebecca Rimel about how civility and a reliance on facts have underpinned Pew’s work for the past 70 years. Hear the full episode at ...

Duration:00:29:45