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Placing the right people at the right dinner parties, funding research centers to control the science on which regulation is based, weekly advertorials in The New York Times for 30 years. These are just some of the ways oil companies created climate denial and made it viral. Join us as we uncover the most elaborate—and most effective—propaganda campaign of the century.

Placing the right people at the right dinner parties, funding research centers to control the science on which regulation is based, weekly advertorials in The New York Times for 30 years. These are just some of the ways oil companies created climate denial and made it viral. Join us as we uncover the most elaborate—and most effective—propaganda campaign of the century.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Placing the right people at the right dinner parties, funding research centers to control the science on which regulation is based, weekly advertorials in The New York Times for 30 years. These are just some of the ways oil companies created climate denial and made it viral. Join us as we uncover the most elaborate—and most effective—propaganda campaign of the century.

Language:

English

Contact:

4153416350


Episodes

Winning the War

11/18/2018
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Fossil fuel industry influence campaigns ensured that we lost a critical 30 years not taking action on climate change. But all is not lost. The technology to address climate change exists, and if there's one thing history teaches us about America it's that radical social change is entirely possible here.

Duration:00:20:04

Campaigns So Successful They've Landed in Court

11/17/2018
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The fossil fuel industry's decades-long information war was so successful that even though oil companies themselves began publicly accepting climate science years ago, the public remains skeptical. Fewer Americans believe in the need to act on climate today than did 30 years ago, despite insurmountable evidence. Industry campaigns were so successful they've now landed oil companies in court, facing multiple suits attempting to hold them accountable for the damages inflicted by unchecked...

Duration:00:15:48

The First Step to Influencing Policy: Setting Research Agendas

11/17/2018
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If you unravel climate policy back to its origins, eventually you get to academic research. Although oil companies dramatically reduced their own scientific research on climate in the 1990s, by the early 2000s they began funding research centers at prestigious universities throughout the country, subtly shaping the research that any eventual policy would be based upon.

Duration:00:15:33

Aggressive Think Tanks, Shouty Pundits, and a New Religious Argument

11/17/2018
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To make media manipulation and lobbying truly effective, oil companies and their public relations firms also had to shift the culture, influencing everything from civil discourse to how religious groups viewed the issue of climate change.

Duration:00:17:27

Exploiting Scientists' Kryptonite: Certainty

11/17/2018
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In addition to using journalists' views on their own objectivity against them, oil companies exploited various weaknesses in science, namely scientists' tendency toward not prioritizing or valuing good communication skills, and their absolute refusal to be certain about anything.

Duration:00:13:11

Weaponizing False Equivalence

11/16/2018
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As climate disinformation campaigns ramped up in the 1990s, oil companies and their PR firms exploited weaknesses in the U.S. media system and propped up "contrarian" scientists to push the narrative of scientific uncertainty and shift how journalists covered the issue.

Duration:00:17:38

The Turn

11/15/2018
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As the price of oil dipped in the early 1980s, management changed at most oil companies and the industry as a whole became more concerned with preserving its core business than expanding in new directions and being "energy companies." Then the campaigns to undermine the science began.

Duration:00:17:56

The Bell Labs of Energy

11/14/2018
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In the 1970s and early 1980s, Exxon wanted to be the Bell Labs of energy. It hired brilliant scientists who conducted cutting-edge research on everything from the "greenhouse effect" to renewable energy. At the time, there was bipartisan support around the idea of tackling global warming, and a sense that American innovation was up to the task. To see the documents referenced in this episode, check out the timeline on drilledpodcast.com.

Duration:00:16:15

Drilled: A True Crime Podcast about Climate Change

10/21/2018
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Launching November 14th, Drilled is a limited series investigative true-crime podcast about the crime of the century: the creation of climate denial.

Duration:00:02:26