I SEE U with Eddie Robinson-logo

I SEE U with Eddie Robinson

News & Politics Podcasts

I SEE U is a unique new program that gives voice to those who have often been unheard. Hosted by Houston Public Media’s Eddie Robinson, I SEE U explores cultural identity through the stories of people and places that have been transformed by the effects of long-standing biases. Eddie guides fascinating conversations with newsmakers who share their personal histories, their struggles and their triumphs. In listening, we learn to empathize and hopefully experience a few ‘a-ha’ moments for ourselves.

I SEE U is a unique new program that gives voice to those who have often been unheard. Hosted by Houston Public Media’s Eddie Robinson, I SEE U explores cultural identity through the stories of people and places that have been transformed by the effects of long-standing biases. Eddie guides fascinating conversations with newsmakers who share their personal histories, their struggles and their triumphs. In listening, we learn to empathize and hopefully experience a few ‘a-ha’ moments for ourselves.

Location:

United States

Description:

I SEE U is a unique new program that gives voice to those who have often been unheard. Hosted by Houston Public Media’s Eddie Robinson, I SEE U explores cultural identity through the stories of people and places that have been transformed by the effects of long-standing biases. Eddie guides fascinating conversations with newsmakers who share their personal histories, their struggles and their triumphs. In listening, we learn to empathize and hopefully experience a few ‘a-ha’ moments for ourselves.

Language:

English

Contact:

7137488888


Episodes

59: Real Hot Girl Inspiration

9/23/2022
Members of a group of community-based organizations recently embarked upon a month-long bus caravan that stretched across several cities throughout the southern region of the country, including places like Atlanta; Birmingham; Little Rock, Arkansas; Houston and Jackson, Mississippi. The tour was designed specifically to support Black girls and young women by providing them with resources and networking tools to help build on their personal and professional career goals. Appropriately titled,...

58: Slavery Ties That Bind Freedom

9/16/2022
Betty Ann Kilby and her family were terrorized when they defied their local school board and the governor of Virginia to desegregate the only high school in their county in 1959. And yet, nearly 50 years later, in 2007, she was willing to talk to a descendant of a family who had once enslaved her ancestors. It was a defining move reminiscent of a well-known quote in Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have a Dream’ speech of 1963. The passage read in part: “I have a dream that one day… the sons...

Duration:01:09:29

57: How to Add Color to White Supremacy

9/10/2022
Author Jill Nagle is not intimidated by facilitating open and honest conversations about white supremacy. She’s even designed workshops and programs to help counsel and coach white people to help them better understand how racism works and how they can use their white privilege to make a difference. But are these programs and teachings really working? Find out as I SEE U takes a provocative look at what some people are doing to overcome racist attitudes and behaviors. Host Eddie Robinson...

Duration:00:52:31

56: Play That Funky Music, Brian Culbertson

9/2/2022
Veteran jazz keyboardist Brian Culbertson has a 25-album discography that offers up his signature sounds of funky instrumentals, sexy soul jams and straight-up, smooth R&B grooves. With a career of delivering some 40 Billboard No. 1 singles, he’s performed and recorded with the industry’s finest – from Stevie Wonder and Bootsy Collins to the late Prince and Maurice White, the founder of the iconic band, Earth Wind & Fire. Culbertson has also earned a very loyal fan base, including online...

Duration:00:52:16

55: Feeding Souls During Harvey

8/26/2022
Brian Greene is President of Houston Food Bank, the largest food distribution bank in the nation. Greene, who once headed the New Orleans food bank, arrived in Houston on the tailwinds of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina when his own Crescent City home flooded with water – only to be pummeled by Hurricane Harvey in 2017, where the first floor of his Houston home took on three feet of storm water. Join I SEE U Host Eddie Robinson as we reflect on one of Houston’s costliest and most devastating...

Duration:00:52:20

54: The Future of Blacks Looks Green

8/19/2022
A native of Houston’s Third Ward, Derryl Bohanna Sr., knows the importance of being industrious, enterprising and disciplined. A product of the U.S. Army and a father of seven, Bohanna quickly realized he needed to figure out a way to financially support his children. But he also learned some very interesting lessons about the concept of saving money and creating generational wealth—early. Join us as I SEE U Host Eddie Robinson chats candidly with children’s book author, Derryl Bohanna, as...

Duration:00:52:21

53: The Valley of the Shadow of Life

8/12/2022
P-VALLEY is a provocative drama series on the cable television network, STARZ. The series follows the lives of employees and exotic dancers who work at a strip club in a fictional town in northern Mississippi. The show’s creator and executive producer, Katori Hall, presents a captivating look at the nuances of southern Black culture. P-VALLEY explores the complexities of our humanity – using extraordinary color, piercing dialogue and remarkable cinematography to tell unique stories and...

Duration:00:52:17

52: A Concealed Treasure Once Incognito

8/4/2022
Acclaimed jazz vocalist and Baltimore native, Maysa Leak, admits to I SEE U that she’s always felt hidden. Starting out as a member of the legendary Stevie Wonder’s background singer entourage, Maysa has been performing in the music business for over three decades. She landed her first lead vocal gig with a British soul collective ironically called, Incognito. But music reps told her she could not appear in a music video for the group because of her weight. And yet, despite her challenges of...

Duration:00:52:16

9: Vietnamese Fishermen v. the KKK [Encore]

7/22/2022
In 1981, militant Klansmen in East Texas waged a terror campaign against recently immigrated Vietnamese fishermen who were trying to make a living near Galveston Bay. As tensions heated up, some began to label the conflict a “race war.” But a legal argument brought justice to the vulnerable community of Vietnamese refugees. Join us we take you on a journey through the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico featuring 87-year-old South Vietnamese army colonel, Nguyen Van Nam; his son Michael; and...

Duration:00:52:21

10: Black A I = Artificial Inclusion [Encore]

7/15/2022
A young computer scientist who grew up in Mississippi is focusing her efforts on fairness and identifying biases in technology. Though she’s working in Atlanta as an artificial intelligence researcher for Amazon, she’s reinvesting much of her earnings towards the development of a multi-million dollar innovation center that’s set to transform her native downtown Jackson. Dr. Nashlie Sephus is also CEO of The Bean Path — a non-profit that works to bridge the “tech gap” in communities where...

Duration:00:52:23

51: Someday, Will We Ever Be Free?

6/17/2022
Many view Juneteenth as a celebration for slaves in Texas who finally received word on June 19, 1865, that they were free. But it took more than two years for that news to reach the ears of those enslaved after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. While it took several more months for slavery to be abolished in 1865, a system known as convict leasing had emerged in Southern states where Blacks were forced into unpaid labor. Historians note that these factors along with...

Duration:00:52:11

50: Good Will Hunting for Great Teachers

5/27/2022
As the nation continues to mourn those killed in a violent elementary school shooting, teachers in classrooms across Texas are saying, ‘enough is enough.’ Reports of a teacher shortage continue to dominate local and regional headlines. One Houston-area union leader put it best—as fresh faces of new teachers enter classrooms through the front door, more and more seasoned, veteran educators are starting to leave through the back door. Join Host Eddie Robinson as I SEE U presents our 50th...

Duration:00:52:26

49: A Trans' Mission Never Ends

5/20/2022
Lou Weaver is a queer, transgender man who grew up in Colorado, but now lives in Houston as a much sought-after speaker for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and trans community. After his transition from female to a man, Weaver discovered something about himself that shook him to his core: White male privilege! Join I SEE U Host Eddie Robinson for an insightful look at what it really means to be transgender. University of Texas medical researcher, Lou Weaver, shares his powerful story of...

Duration:00:52:20

48: WILL D.E.I. D.I.E.?

5/13/2022
As we approach another anniversary of Houstonian George Floyd’s death, I SEE U examines company and organizational initiatives that had been triggered once calls for racial justice and global protests erupted two years ago. But are employers today fully committed to these measures of growth? Experts say many companies are simply checking boxes and have no real intentions of undergoing major, meaningful change when it comes to fostering and promoting a diverse, equitable and inclusive...

Duration:01:00:48

47: What U Focus On, U Become

5/7/2022
Interdisciplinary scholar and curator Laura Marshall Clark has maintained a love for the arts, a thirst for the humanities, along with a passion for literature and Native American history throughout her life. But what happens when you embrace and infuse religion into those interests? And with religion and spirituality playing such key roles in Native American art, why does she still feel intimidated by her belief system in Christianity? Find out as I SEE U explores aspects of identity,...

Duration:00:52:14

46: Sugar Land Not So Sweet

4/29/2022
Convict leasing, a gruesome practice that started in 1867, was highly profitable for states across the South and for the families who owned plantations. It was a time when Sugar Land, Texas was known to carry a network of sugar cane farms and state-sanctioned labor camps after the abolition of slavery. It also wasn't uncommon for Black men to be arrested for often times bogus or trumped up charges, so that plantation owners could build a solid workforce of leased laborers. But in February of...

Duration:00:52:17

45: A Higher Power To The People

4/22/2022
Dr. Victoria Massie is a professor of anthropology at Rice University. This fall, she’s introducing students to a new course that explores concepts and theories related to Black women’s lived experiences and how those narratives help shape discussions around race and gender. Interestingly enough, Dr. Massie’s late grandfather, Dr. Samuel Massie, was a renowned chemist who worked as a technician on The Manhattan Project during World War II. He was also the first African-American professor at...

Duration:00:52:40

44: We Shall Not Be Moved

4/15/2022
Only a few descendants of West African slaves remain on a coastal Georgia portion of land called, Sapelo Island. In the early 1800s, ancestors of the Gullah Geechee community were brought to these barrier islands along the nation’s southeast Atlantic coast to work on plantations. These slaves acquired land on the island – but decades later, that ownership is almost diminished. Many of the residents say they’ve been squeezed out due to deliberate tax hikes and gentrification of the area. Join...

Duration:00:16:07

43: Black Films, White Profits

4/8/2022
Blacks have historically been portrayed in films as pimps, hustlers, prostitutes, maids, gang-bangers, drug addicts, alcoholics, junkies and crime-ridden thieves. Though filmmakers would describe these roles as simply reflecting life’s realities in technicolor. But were these depictions, subconsciously, impacting the essence of Black creativity, culture and identity for decades to come? Join I SEE U host Eddie Robinson for a provocative and very candid conversation with one of the only...

Duration:00:52:36

42: The Gay Black Civil Rights Financier

4/1/2022
His father, born into slavery, had become one of the first African American millionaires in the United States. His mother, though devoted to Black civil rights, was a renowned actress and had kept her racial background a secret. And in 1897, Alonzo and Adrienne Herndon had a son – their only child – named Norris Herndon, who would become the second President, inherited by his father, of the historic, Black-owned Atlanta Life Insurance Company. Behind the scenes, Norris was a major financier...

Duration:00:52:49