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KQED's Forum

KQED

Forum tells remarkable and true stories about who we are and where we live. In the first hour, Alexis Madrigal convenes the diverse voices of the Bay Area, before turning to Mina Kim for the second hour to chronicle and center Californians’ experience. In an increasingly divided world, Mina and Alexis host conversations that inform, challenge and unify listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints. Want to call/submit your comments during our live Forum program Mon-Fri, 9am-11am? We'd love to hear from you! Please dial 866.SF.FORUM or (866) 733-6786 or email forum@kqed.org, tweet, or post on Facebook.

Forum tells remarkable and true stories about who we are and where we live. In the first hour, Alexis Madrigal convenes the diverse voices of the Bay Area, before turning to Mina Kim for the second hour to chronicle and center Californians’ experience. In an increasingly divided world, Mina and Alexis host conversations that inform, challenge and unify listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints. Want to call/submit your comments during our live Forum program Mon-Fri, 9am-11am? We'd love to hear from you! Please dial 866.SF.FORUM or (866) 733-6786 or email forum@kqed.org, tweet, or post on Facebook.

Location:

San Francisco, CA

Networks:

KQED

Description:

Forum tells remarkable and true stories about who we are and where we live. In the first hour, Alexis Madrigal convenes the diverse voices of the Bay Area, before turning to Mina Kim for the second hour to chronicle and center Californians’ experience. In an increasingly divided world, Mina and Alexis host conversations that inform, challenge and unify listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints. Want to call/submit your comments during our live Forum program Mon-Fri, 9am-11am? We'd love to hear from you! Please dial 866.SF.FORUM or (866) 733-6786 or email forum@kqed.org, tweet, or post on Facebook.

Language:

English


Episodes

FBI Search of Trump Residence Prompts Republican Outcry

8/10/2022
The FBI executed a search of Donald Trump’s Palm Beach, FL residence on Monday, suggesting that the Department of Justice could be edging closer to bringing criminal charges against the former president. News of the raid prompted house minority leader Kevin McCarthy to issue a statement accusing the DOJ of “weaponized politicization” and warning Attorney General Merrick Garland to “preserve your documents and clear your calendar.” Meanwhile, a federal appellate court ruled Tuesday that the...

Duration:00:52:03

Cold Soup and Hot Tea: What We Eat When Summer Heats Up

8/10/2022
Temperatures have been reaching what passes as warm in and around San Francisco, and in other parts of the Bay Area it’s legitimately hot. We’ll talk about what we eat and drink when the temperatures soar. Do you sweat it out with a spicy hot soup or cool down with a block of cold tofu? Do you seek out halo-halo, Italian ice or a bomb pop? We’re talking about hot weather foods in a summer edition of All You Can Eat, our regular segment with KQED Food Editor Luke Tsai. Guests: Luke Tsai, food...

Duration:00:52:26

What Makes a Summer Movie?

8/9/2022
“Top Gun: Maverick,” the Tom Cruise-starring sequel to the 1986 Tom Cruise-starring classic, is topping this summer’s domestic box office — and it’s now the U.S.’ seventh highest-grossing film, ever. “Nope,” the third movie from horror visionary Jordan Peele, has friends swapping interpretations around the campfire. And “Minions: The Rise of Gru” wasn’t just a big hit with little kids, but also with teens who grew up with the franchise — and showed up to screenings in suits, calling...

Duration:00:38:05

What the Massive Climate Change Bill Could Mean for You and the Planet

8/9/2022
After decades of attempts to enact climate change legislation, the Senate passed a massive bill this weekend. The Inflation Reduction Act directs nearly $370 billion dollars in new spending to slash carbon emissions in the next eight years by giving Americans more access to clean energy. Robinson Meyer, staff writer at The Atlantic, will join us to break down what’s in the largest federal clean energy investment in U.S. history and what you need to know. Guests: Robinson Meyer, staff writer,...

Duration:00:38:27

Catherine Ceniza Choy on The Multiplicity of Asian American Histories

8/8/2022
Americans of Asian descent are commonly lumped together under the broad identifier of “Asian American.” But such a general term can overlook powerful histories and distinctions among ethnicities. In her new book “Asian American Histories of the United States,” author Catherine Ceniza Choy reminds us that Asian Americans are not a monolith. “Like a galaxy of stars,” she writes, “the multiple origins of Asian American history are distinctive, but most meaningful when collectively visible as in...

Duration:00:52:23

Ingrid Rojas Contreras’ New Memoir Explores Amnesia, Family History and Ghosts

8/8/2022
In her new memoir, “The Man Who Could Move Clouds,” Ingrid Rojas Contreras tells the story of a journey she took with her mother to her native Colombia to exhume her grandfather’s remains. She intricately weaves family histories involving her curandero grandfather, her mother who could appear in two places at once and her own magical inheritance sparked by a bout of amnesia. Rojas Contreras, who now calls the Bay Area home, joins us to talk about infusing magic into story telling and how...

Duration:00:52:31

Oakland Museum’s “Hella Feminist” Asks Visitors to Challenge, and Expand, Meaning of Feminism

8/5/2022
The Oakland Museum’s new exhibit, Hella Feminist, was scheduled to open two years ago to mark the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote. The pandemic pushed the opening into a drastically changed climate for women after the Supreme Court overturned the federal right to an abortion. Through the works of contemporary artists responding to our current moment and an examination of historical items from the museum’s archive, the exhibit challenges visitors to interrogate the...

Duration:00:52:29

Birth Mothers Share Their Adoption Experiences

8/5/2022
Adoption is frequently cited, particularly among those opposed to abortion, as a solution to an unwanted pregnancy. But in fact, fewer than one in ten people denied abortion care chooses to put their child up for adoption, according to UCSF studies. We’ll explore why, and we’ll hear from women who did choose adoption about their experiences. Guests: Angie Swanson-Kyriaco, birth mother; executive director, MPower Alliance Gretchen Sisson, sociologist in the department of obstetrics and...

Duration:00:52:33

As Cases Rise, Gov. Newsom Declares State of Emergency to Address Monkeypox

8/4/2022
California reported more than 1,100 probable or confirmed cases of monkeypox on Tuesday, a day after Governor Newsom declared a public health state of emergency to address the rapid spread of the disease in the state. Monkeypox, which spreads through close physical contact, has disproportionately affected gay and bisexual men, and LGBTQ activists are protesting the long wait times and limited availability of vaccines in many California counties. We’ll take your questions about monkeypox, the...

Local Grocers Break Down the Impact of Inflation on Your Shopping List

8/4/2022
Inflation has driven prices skyward for all kinds of goods from gas to home goods. Even grocery store staples like cereal, milk and eggs have seen price hikes. While big chain brands might be able to weather these increases better, independent retailers are feeling these costs much more sharply. We’ll talk to local grocers from around the Bay Area to hear how they are dealing with the impact of inflation on their businesses and communities. Guests: Chi Dixon, marketing and communications...

Duration:00:53:23

How to Replace Your Water-Intensive Lawn

8/3/2022
Landscape irrigation accounts for about half of residential water use in California, according to state data. That’s leading some drought-conscious residents to consider tearing up their lawns in favor of less water-intensive gardens. We’ll talk about how to embark on removing your lawn and the plants, grasses and trees you might consider replacing it with. Guests: Flora Grubb, owner, Flora Grubb Gardens in San Francisco Shawn Maestretti, founder and principal, Studio Petrichor - a landscape...

Duration:00:52:19

Ethiopian Community in Bay Area Agonize As Humanitarian Crisis, Civil War Largely Ignored

8/3/2022
A violent civil war has raged in Ethiopia for nearly two years, claiming 500,000 lives and displacing millions. Despite the current ceasefire, humanitarian aid is struggling to reach those who need it, leaving millions more at risk of starvation. Watching from afar, the Bay Area community of Ethiopians are trying to raise awareness about the crisis abroad. But the divisions between ethnic groups in Ethiopia are also finding their way closer to home. We’ll discuss the situation abroad and...

Duration:00:52:24

How Has the Crypto Crash Affected You?

8/2/2022
Popular cryptocurrencies have plunged in 2022: both Bitcoin and Ethereum have lost about half their value since the first of the year, and Dogecoin has fallen by more 90% since its peak in 2021. But while wealthy and early crypto investors have weathered the downturn, smaller players have fared less well, revealing what New York Times fintech reporter David Yaffe-Bellany calls "a yawning divide." We talk about the crypto collapse and hear from you, if you're a crypto investor: about how has...

Duration:00:52:25

'Losing It' Investigates Myths and Realities of Dieting

8/2/2022
Polls show that roughly a quarter of Americans are dieting. That’s despite research showing that very few people succeed in losing weight and keeping it off over time. A new Bloomberg podcast, Losing It, investigates the myths and realities of nutritional science and the power of the dieting industry. Forum talks with the podcast creators about the invention of the calorie as a weight loss tool, the branding of the South Beach Diet, and the complex relationship between health and the numbers...

Duration:00:52:28

The Future of Sex Education in a Post-Roe America

8/1/2022
Researchers estimate that as many as half of pregnancies in the United States were not planned and roughly one in five pregnancies ends in an abortion. With the U.S. Supreme Court’s reversal of Roe v. Wade and the end of the federal right to an abortion, many sexual health educators and advocates are calling to enhance reproductive education – for people of all ages. Advocates say prevention and education can help people take charge of their reproductive health, but in many states sex...

Duration:00:52:10

The Future of Storytelling, as Charted by Disabled Artists

8/1/2022
Even as we’re seeing more on-screen depictions of disability in films like “CODA” and “Sound of Metal,” the number of disabled people behind the camera remains low. That affects what stories are told — and their accuracy. As disabled artists push for more opportunities to tell their stories — on film, in visual art and through dance — we’ll talk with some in California who are advancing the cultural landscape of disability storytelling. We want to hear from you: What stories would you like...

Duration:00:51:44

What Would Your Ideal Third Party Stand For?

7/29/2022
Former presidential candidate Andrew Yang together with dozens of other Democratic and Republican politicians announced on Wednesday that they're launching Forward, a new political party designed to appeal to centrists. But historically, third political parties have gained little traction in the United States. We'll talk about why and what could be different this time. And we'll hear from you: Would you support a third political party? What would it stand for? Guests: Eric Schickler,...

Duration:00:52:38

Logging in to The World of Collegiate Esports

7/29/2022
While the concept of spectators packing an arena to watch competitive video gaming at a college level may be perplexing to more traditional sports fans, the popularity of collegiate esports is growing in the Bay Area. in the Bay Area. In 2018 the streaming platform Twitch, which hosts esports competitions, moved their headquarters to San Francisco. In 2021, San Jose State University’s Bay Area Vandals competed in the biggest international Valorant tournament and the Chase Center is hosting...

Duration:00:52:44

Family Heirlooms — Unexpected and Traditional — And What They Mean to Us

7/28/2022
For New Yorker staff writer Hua Hsu, they’re cardboard cutouts that decorated his parents’ wedding, “each the size of a 45-r.p.m. single: an orange Snoopy and two Woodstocks, one white and one light blue.” For artist Ari Bird, it’s a tree pompom that her grandfather painted gold and gave to her as a child. Whether it's a portrait, a wedding dress, an album or a Snoopy cutout, the objects we inherit speak to who our families are, who we were, and what we value. We want to hear from you:...

Duration:00:52:39

“80 over 80” Celebrates San Franciscans in Their 9 Decade and Beyond

7/28/2022
After seeing yet another ‘30 under 30’ and ‘40 under 40’ list celebrating the achievements of young people, San Francisco geriatric doctor Anna Chodos decided it was time people started hearing about the remarkable achievement of living into old age. She started the 80 over 80 project to share the stories and experiences of San Franciscans over the age of 80. Forum talks with Chodos and participants about their rich and rewarding lives, their experiences during the pandemic, and aging in a...

Duration:00:52:39