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KQED's Forum

KQED

Forum finds the most interesting stories about where we live, who we are, and charts where our region and world are headed. Hosts Mina Kim and Alexis Madrigal invite communities in the Bay Area and California to engage in meaningful conversation in a two-hour live show that informs and challenges listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints.

Forum finds the most interesting stories about where we live, who we are, and charts where our region and world are headed. Hosts Mina Kim and Alexis Madrigal invite communities in the Bay Area and California to engage in meaningful conversation in a two-hour live show that informs and challenges listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints.

Location:

San Francisco, CA

Networks:

KQED

Description:

Forum finds the most interesting stories about where we live, who we are, and charts where our region and world are headed. Hosts Mina Kim and Alexis Madrigal invite communities in the Bay Area and California to engage in meaningful conversation in a two-hour live show that informs and challenges listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints.

Language:

English


Episodes

Checking in on Bay Area Ferries

7/26/2021
Not much can beat sipping a coffee or drink from the cafe as you gaze over the SF skyline heading to work — or returning home — on one of the ferries that crisscross the San Francisco Bay. But the pandemic lockdown hit the ferries hard: From one day to the next, the Golden Gate Ferry went from operating six vessels a day, to two. In this hour, we get the latest on when ferry service will be restored to pre-pandemic levels, hear about new routes and plans for a “green fleet” and learn why...

Duration:00:53:56

'Orca' Explores Extinction Crisis Facing Pacific Northwest Whales

7/26/2021
In 2018, science journalist Lynda Mapes drew international attention for her day-by-day coverage of the female orca known as "Tahlequah," who carried her dead newborn calf more than 1000 miles through the Salish Sea before finally letting her go. That reporting formed the basis for Mapes's newest book "Orca: Shared Waters, Shared Home," which explores the sophisticated social networks that orcas form and the environmental threats that are driving them to extinction.

Duration:00:53:56

Newest ‘Washington Week’ Moderator Yamiche Alcindor Makes Her Mark

7/23/2021
Yamiche Alcindor may be the ultimate Washington multi-tasker. She’s the White House correspondent for the PBS Newshour, a political contributor for NBC News and MSNBC, and as of this May, she is the new moderator of “Washington Week,” the current affairs program that has been on air since 1967. At “Washington Week,” Alcindor follows in the footsteps of her mentor, Gwen Ifill, who previously hosted the show and died of cancer in 2016. We’ll talk to Alcindor about covering Washington, her...

Duration:00:19:19

The Science of Sweat

7/23/2021
To sweat is human. That’s according to science journalist Sarah Everts, whose new book “The Joy of Sweat” explores the biology of what she calls our “oddly flamboyant” way of controlling body temperature. We’ll hear why some of us are more profuse -- and smellier -- perspirers than others, what drives our cravings for sweaty workouts and hot soaks and why we still spend billions annually on products to hide the effects of our natural cooling system.

Duration:00:33:12

How to Picnic in Style in the Bay Area

7/23/2021
There’s no better time than now to head out for a picnic. There are few weather impediments in the Bay Area — besides fog and wind — and the pandemic taught us that enjoying life outdoors is a good way to go. Whether you’re just having a sunset cocktail (or mocktail) or going full-on three-course meal, we’ll talk about how to picnic in style, which foods are best to bring and where to find that perfect picnic spot. We’ll get ideas to liven up your picnic with San Francisco Chronicle’s...

Duration:00:19:17

Electronic Artist Nam June Paik Celebrated in SFMOMA Retrospective

7/23/2021
In the first retrospective of his work on the West Coast, SFMOMA’s current exhibition on electronic art pioneer Nam June Paik features more than 200 works from the artist whose five-decade career “changed the way we look at screens.” One of most acclaimed of the first generation of video artists, Paik’s early work in the 1960s changed perceptions of television, video and the boundary between art and spectator through its integration of camera, video, music and performance. We’ll talk about...

Duration:00:35:02

July Book Club: ‘Preparatory Notes for Future Masterpieces’ by Maceo Montoya

7/22/2021
For our inaugural Forum Book Club, we’ve picked Maceo Montoya’s “Preparatory Notes for Future Masterpieces.” The book interweaves its narrative with drawings and scholarly footnotes to tell the story of an aspiring painter with grand ambitions. This would-be artist faces several roadblocks: he is coming of age in 1940s New Mexico with no economic means to support his dreams and, instead of painting, he writes long notes for future works of art. Montoya takes readers along the narrator’s...

Duration:00:54:06

Space Travel for Everyone. The Final Frontier?

7/22/2021
Recent space flights by Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson have raised the tantalizing question of whether space travel is in our near future. Space exploration has traditionally been the venture of governments, but with last November’s launch of an astronaut crew to the International Space Station by Elon Musk’s company SpaceX, commercial flights to deep space seem more tangible. But is privatized space travel by billionaires just a vanity project? Or is this a huge step towards tackling space,...

Duration:00:33:02

To Reduce Fire Risk, PG&E to Bury 10,000 Miles of Power Lines

7/22/2021
PG&E announced yesterday that it will bury power lines in high wildfire risk areas of California, amounting to 10,000 miles of lines, enough to reach about halfway around the earth. The utility says the plan would also eliminate the need to order power shutdowns during high fire risk events. We’ll talk with an expert about the advantages of underground power lines and what they cost.

Duration:00:14:09

California Approves Reparations for Survivors of Forced Sterilization

7/21/2021
In the first half of the 20th century, California forcibly sterilized more than 20,000 people in state hospitals and other institutions, under a 1909 eugenics law that remained on the books for seven decades. The victims, deemed by the state as "feeble-minded" or otherwise unfit to have children, were disproportionately women and racial minorities. Now, the state is set to pay reparations to hundreds of survivors, as well as to victims who were involuntarily sterilized in state prisons well...

Duration:00:52:37

'An Ugly Truth' Examines Facebook's Desire To Dominate

7/21/2021
President Joe Biden lashed out at Facebook last week, saying the site was killing people by spreading coronavirus-vaccine misinformation. As New York Times reporters Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frenkel highlight in their new book An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebooks Battle for Domination, conspiracy theories and hate speech are not just problems that plague the company, they are the inevitable byproducts of the company's algorithms which keep users glued to the screen and mines their data. Relying on...

Duration:00:52:27

The Cultural Relevance of ‘Boyz N The Hood,’ 30 Years Later

7/20/2021
Writer and director John Singleton’s 1991 debut film “Boyz N the Hood,” centered on the coming of age of a Black man in South Central Los Angeles named Tre. Played by Cuba Gooding Jr., Tre learns lessons about Black manhood, cyclical violence and gentrification from his father, played by Laurence Fishburne, and his neighbors, with standout performances by Ice Cube and Morris Chestnut. Some critics called the film the cinematic equivalent of N.W.A.’s music, from which it draws its title, for...

Duration:00:20:14

Even the Wealthiest Nations are Unprepared for a Hotter Planet

7/20/2021
In Germany, searches for the missing continue in the wake of recent catastrophic flooding that destroyed villages and claimed almost 200 lives so far. That disaster, together with wildfires that rage in Canada and the western U.S. and record-breaking temperatures in Russia, led New York Times climate correspondent Somini Sengupta to conclude that “the world as a whole is neither prepared to slow down climate change, nor live with it.” We’ll talk to Sengupta about why even wealthy countries...

Duration:00:32:42

Drought, Warming Temperatures Threaten Endangered California Salmon Population

7/20/2021
California’s ongoing drought and predicted heatwave is causing overly warm and low level waters and threatening to kill off the entire populations of already endangered species like the chinook salmon. Negotiations between the State Water Resources Control Board and the federal Bureau of Reclamation approved a plan for managing water levels. However, experts predict that releasing water into the irrigation system this early will disrupt salmon spawning season and could kill as many as 88% of...

Duration:00:19:19

State Allocates Additional $500 Million for Wildfire Prevention

7/20/2021
Fuel breaks and prescribed burns are some of the tools used by firefighters to help reduce the severity of wildfires. California Governor Gavin Newsom was recently criticized for misrepresenting his track record when it comes to wildfire prevention, clearing just a fraction of the acreage claimed. The state has now set aside an additional $500 million for wildfire prevention, but will it be enough? As we head toward peak fire season this fall, we’ll get the latest science around wildfire...

Duration:00:33:03

After Texas Court Ruling, What’s the Future for Young Immigrants and DACA Recipients?

7/19/2021
Hundreds of thousands of immigrants in the U.S. are in limbo, after a Texas judge ruled on Friday that former President Barack Obama illegally launched the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in 2012. The ruling does not end legal protections for the roughly 650,000 current DACA participants who came to the United States as children and who are not residents or citizens. However the legal decision does suspend approvals of new applications and leaves open the door for DACA to end...

Duration:00:52:37

Next Steps for a Childcare System in Crisis

7/19/2021
California has almost 3 million children 5 years old and under. Hundreds of thousands of these kids lack affordable childcare because of backlogs in the state’s subsidized childcare program. The pandemic --which led to the closure of 8,500 childcare facilities--only worsened the bottleneck. And lack of childcare means that in many households one--or both parents--won’t be able to work. In this hour, we examine the long term access and affordability problems in early childhood care and how it...

Duration:00:52:32

Why Talking to Strangers is Good for Us

7/16/2021
Many of us spent the better part of the last pandemic year taking pains to minimize interactions with people outside our households or pods. With social venues now reopened, many vaccinated adults have the chance to meet new people and chat at length again — but do we remember how to talk to strangers? Journalist Joe Keohane joins us to remind us how and to explain why even small talk and passing interactions with those we don’t know can enhance happiness, cognitive functioning and our sense...

Duration:00:39:16

UCSF Scientists Translate Brain Signals to Words on a Screen

7/16/2021
In a major breakthrough, scientists at UC San Francisco developed technology to decode words from the brain activity of a paralyzed man who is unable to speak and translate them to text that appears on a screen. The technology, known as a “speech neuroprosthesis,” may hold promise for the thousands of people each year who lose speech owing to a stroke, accident or disease. We’ll talk to the researchers about their achievement.

Duration:00:13:44

Tell Us Your Summer Reading Picks

7/16/2021
It's summer in the Bay Area, which means it’s time to cozy up by the fire and read some books about tropical islands, deserts and other warm places. We’ll gather a panel of Bay Area booksellers and bookworms to discuss summer reading trends and the best books coming out this summer. They’ll take your questions on what to stick in your bag for that campervan trip, whether you’re looking to dive into a weighty historical biography or plow through a pile of pulpy fun. And we’ll want to hear...

Duration:00:51:41