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Mongabay Newscast

News & Politics Podcasts

News and inspiration from nature’s frontline, featuring inspiring guests and deeper analysis of the global environmental issues explored every day by the Mongabay.com team, from climate change to biodiversity, tropical ecology, wildlife, and more. The show airs every other week.

Location:

United States

Description:

News and inspiration from nature’s frontline, featuring inspiring guests and deeper analysis of the global environmental issues explored every day by the Mongabay.com team, from climate change to biodiversity, tropical ecology, wildlife, and more. The show airs every other week.

Twitter:

@mongabay

Language:

English


Episodes
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'Biotic pump’ theory could explain how forests effect weather, wind and climate

6/18/2024
The biotic pump theory has been controversial in the climate science community ever since Anastassia Makarieva and Victor Gorshkov published their paper about it to the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics in 2010. If true, the theory sheds light on how the interior forests of vast continents influence wind and the water cycles that supply whole nations, flipping traditional hydrological and atmospheric science on its head. Anastassia Makarieva joins this episode to discuss the theory and its implications for future climate modeling with co-host Rachel Donald. Want more? Read a related Amazon-specific interview with Makarieva and Antonio Nobre here. Love this conversation? Please share it with a friend! And if you really enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing. Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet, and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Please send your ideas and feedback to submissions@mongabay.com. Image: Physicist Anastassia Makarieva co-developed the biotic pump theory of how forests direct the movement of moisture. Image ZED/Grifa Filmes. --- Timecodes (00:00:00) Introduction (00:02:41) Understanding the Biotic Pump Theory (00:09:38) Tipping Points (00:15:31) The Climate Regulating Function of Ecosystems (00:25:51) Lagging Behind the Data (00:33:20) Building a Different Climate Model (00:41:04) Addressing the Controversy (00:45:41) Territory, Boundaries and Water (00:52:13) Credits

Duration:00:54:07

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Unmasking the illusion of renewable biomass energy with Justin Catanoso

6/11/2024
Burning wood to generate electricity – ‘biomass energy’ – is increasingly used as a renewable replacement for burning coal in nations like the UK, Japan, and South Korea, even though its emissions are not carbon neutral. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, reporter Justin Catanoso details how years of investigation helped him uncover a complicated web of public relations messaging used by industry giants that obscures the fact that replanting trees after cutting them down and burning them is not carbon neutral or renewable and severely harms global biodiversity, and forests. Catanoso lives near biomass industry giant Enviva in North Carolina and has reported on their practices extensively, including the claim that they only use sustainable wood waste in their product, which his investigation disproved. Though it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy this year, it remains the single largest producer of wood pellets globally. “When those trees get ripped out, that carbon gets released. And that comes before we process this wood and ship it…then we burn it and don't count those emissions. This is just [an] imponderable policy,” he says in this episode. Read Justin's coverage of the UK biomass firm Drax and their attempt to open two large wood pellet plants in California to ship 1 million tons annually to Japan and South Korea, where they will be burned in converted coal plants. If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing. Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet, and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Please send your ideas and feedback to submissions@mongabay.com. Image: Wood pellets for biomass energy. Image courtesy of Dogwood Alliance. --- Timecodes (00:00:00) Introduction to Biomass and Carbon Emissions (00:03:08) Understanding the problems with biomass fuel (00:08:18) Clear-Cutting in North Carolina and British Columbia (00:12:48) Physics Doesn't Fall for Accounting Tricks (00:19:55) Understanding the Arguments from the Industry (00:25:30) Picking Apart the Logic (00:28:26) Why We Don't Have Long-term Solutions (00:34:27) Overcoming an Impossible Situation (00:39:55) Post-chat (00:49:28) Credits

Duration:00:51:02

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Indigenous economics offers alternative to Wall Street's financialization of nature

6/4/2024
Putting a dollar amount on a single species, or entire ecosystems, is a contentious idea, but in 2023, the New York Stock Exchange proposed a new nature-based asset class which put a price tag on global nature of 5,000 trillion U.S. dollars. This financialization of nature comes with perverse incentives and fails to recognize the intrinsic value contained in biodiversity and all the benefits it provides for humans, argues Indigenous economist Rebecca Adamson, on this episode. Instead, she suggests basing economies on principles contained in Indigenous economics. "The most simple thing would be to fit your economy into a living, breathing, natural physics law framework. And if you look at Indigenous economies, they really talk about balance and harmony, and those aren't quaint customs. Those are design principles," she says. Hear a related Mongabay podcast interview on the connection between nature and financial systems with author Brett Scott, here. We also recently spoke with National Geographic photographer Kiliii Yuyan about what Indigenous knowledge has to offer conservation, here. If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing. Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet, and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Please send your ideas and feedback to submissions@mongabay.com. Image: The doll orchid. Image courtesy of Bhathiya Gopallawa. --- (00:00:00) Introduction (00:01:30) The Financialization of Nature (00:07:35) Indigenous Economic Principles (00:14:04) Can Putting a Price on Nature Save it? (00:27:15) Redistribution and Reciprocity (00:33:15) The Ubiquity of Violence (00:38:37) The Wealth Gap and Its Implications (00:41:31) The Power of Shareholder Activism (00:44:36) Indigenous Economic Systems and Modern Applications (00:51:57) A Critical Analysis of the Financialization of Nature (01:00:27) Religious Perspectives on Environmental Awareness (01:04:24) Credits

Duration:01:05:52

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Koala conservation delayed while government pursues faulty offset schemes

5/28/2024
Two experts join the Mongabay Newscast to discuss the decline in koala populations in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW), even as city councils and the government green light development projects on koala habitats that aren't being replaced by biodiversity offset schemes, ecologist Yung En Chee of the University of Melbourne, explains. Meanwhile, the promised Great Koala National Park has been delayed by NSW Premier Chris Minns, even as his state allows logging of koala habitat within the park borders while he tries to set up a carbon credit scheme to monetize the protected area, says journalist Stephen Long with Australia Institute. “I'm not sure how long this failure has to persist before we decide that we really ought to change course,” says Chee of the biodiversity credit schemes, which seem to be based on outdated data, and don’t come close to satisfying their ‘no net loss’ of biodiversity goals. See related coverage: How a conservation NGO uses drones and artificial intelligence to detect koalas that survive bushfires, here. If you want to read more on biodiversity offsetting and 'no net loss,' please read this resource from the IUCN. If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing. Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet, and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Please send your ideas and feedback to submissions@mongabay.com. Image: Gumbaynggirr Country is home to the dunggiirr, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), one of the totem animals for the Gumbaynggirr people. Koalas numbers are estimated to be in the tens of thousands in the state of New South Wales. Image by Steve Franklin via Unsplash (Public domain). -- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (01:34) The Koala Crisis in New South Wales (04:33) Where is the Great Koala National Park? (06:39) Logging Activities and Government Delays (09:53) The Problem with Carbon Credits (16:46) Interview with Yung En Chee (18:38) Biodiversity Offsets: Concept and Criticism (20:15) Failures in Biodiversity Offset Implementation (31:23) Double Dipping and Offset Market Issues (35:22) Conclusion

Duration:00:38:56

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Can the 'Right to Roam' boost nature connection and restoration?

5/21/2024
On this episode of Mongabay’s podcast, Rachel Donald speaks with campaigner and activist Jon Moses about the ‘right to roam’ movement in England which seeks to reclaim common rights to use private and public land to reconnect with nature and repair the damage done from centuries of exclusionary land ownership. In this discussion and the new book Wild Service: Why Nature Needs You he's co-edited with Nick Hayes, Moses recounts the history of land ownership change in England ('enclosure') and why re-establishing a common ‘freedom to roam’—a right observed in other nations such as the Czech Republic or Norway—is needed. English citizens currently only have access to 8% of their land, for example. “There needs to be a kind of rethinking really of [what] people's place is in the landscape and how that intersects with a kind of [new] relationship between people and nature as well,” he says on this episode. If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing. Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet, and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: Participants of the 'Love Your River' event on the River Derwent. Image courtesy of Jon Moses. --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (02:19) The 'Right to Roam' (06:06) The historical context of 'enclosure' (13:42) The modern struggle to reclaim access to nature (27:49) Cross cultural perspectives, and breaking the barriers (38:32) Post-chat (50:19) Credits

Duration:00:51:54

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What's unique about Canada's environment? 'The Narwhal' brings top news and views

5/7/2024
On this episode of Mongabay’s podcast, we speak with a co-founder of the award-winning Canadian nonprofit news outlet ‘The Narwhal,’ Emma Gilchrist. She reflects on Canada’s unique natural legacy, her organization's successes, the state of environmental reporting in the nature-rich nation, how she sees ‘The Narwhal’ filling the gaps in historically neglected stories and viewpoints, and why something as universally appreciated as nature can still be a polarizing topic. She also details a legal battle her organization is involved in that could have significant implications for press freedom in Canada. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: Bow Lake in Banff, Canada. Photo credit: Rhett A. Butler. --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (02:30) The mission and impact of 'The Narwhal' (05:16) The Canadian environmental paradox (24:40) Fighting for press freedom (29:31) An uncertain political landscape (34:50) Post-chat: independent outlets make waves (45:58) Credits

Duration:00:47:47

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How a grassroots legal effort defeated a giant Australian coal mine

4/29/2024
In recognition of her leadership and advocacy, Indigenous Wirdi woman Murrawah Maroochy Johnson has been awarded the 2024 Goldman Environmental Prize. She joins the Mongabay Newscast to discuss a landmark victory for First Nations rights in Australia, led by her organization Youth Verdict against Waratah Coal, which resulted in the Land Court of Queensland recommending a rejection of a mining lease in the Galilee Basin that would have added 1.58 billion tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere over its lifespan. The court case set multiple precedents in Australia, including being the first successful case to link the impacts of climate change with human rights, and the first to include on-Country evidence from First Nations witnesses. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: 2024 Goldman Prize winner Murrawah Maroochy Johnson. Photo courtesy of Goldman Environmental Prize. --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (02:51) An unprecedented victory (05:33) Including on-Country evidence (16:17) Future legal implications (20:34) Challenges of navigating the legal system (26:14) Looking to the future (28:16) Credits

Duration:00:30:09

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Energy transition minerals: questions, consent and costs are key

4/23/2024
Indigenous rights advocate and executive director of SIRGE Coalition, Galina Angarova, and environmental journalist/author of the Substack newsletter Green Rocks, Ian Morse, join us to detail the key social and environmental concerns, impacts, and questions we should be asking about the mining of elements used in everything from the global renewable energy transition to the device in your hand. Research indicates that 54% of all transition minerals occur on or near Indigenous land. Despite this fact, no nation anywhere has properly enforced Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) protocols in line with standards in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). Further, local communities too seldom benefit from their extraction, while suffering their consequences in the form of reduced air and/or water quality. This conversation was originally broadcast on Mongabay's YouTube channel to a live audience of journalists but the conversation contains detailed insight and analysis on a vital topic listeners of the Newscast will appreciate. Those interested in participating in Mongabay's webinar series are encouraged to subscribe to the YouTube Channel or sign up for Mongagabay's Webinar Newsletter here. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: A symbol for a renewable charging station. (Photo courtesy of Nicola Sznajder/Flickr) --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (02:57) Why are they called 'transition minerals?' (07:04) Geopolitical tensions and complications (16:04) Realities of mining windfalls (26:30) Cartelization concerns (32:50) Environmental and human rights impacts (39:46) Reporting on Free Prior and Informed Consent (46:49) Recycling (54:45) Additional Indigenous rights concerns (57:04) Certification schemes and community-led mining initiatives (01:03:22) Deep-sea mining (01:09:21) Credits

Duration:01:11:00

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The high costs of resource-based conflicts for people & planet

4/16/2024
On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, journalist Dahr Jamail joins co-host Rachel Donald to discuss the ways many international conflicts are based on resource scarcity. Notable as an unembedded reporter during the US-led Iraq invasion, Jamail expands on the human and ecological costs to these conflicts, the purported reasons behind them, how those justifications are covered in the media, and the continued stress these conflicts put on society. "There was a saying a ways back by Lester Brown [who] said 'land is the new gold and water is the new oil.' And I think that that perspective is really kind of driving what we're seeing," Jamail says. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: A U.S. Army soldier watching a burning oil well at the Rumaila oil field in Iraq in April 2003. Image by Arlo K. Abrahamson/DoD via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain). --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (01:57) From Alaska to Iraq (10:59) Resource scarcity and the geopolitics of war (29:31) New horizons and new tensions (35:09) Post-show discussion (50:05) Credits

Duration:00:51:42

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How young activists navigate a hostile climate with honest conversations

4/9/2024
On today's episode, climate activist and founder of the non-profit Force of Nature, Clover Hogan, details list of challenges activists face both from outside and within their movements. Not only do environmental activists face growing legal and physical threats across the globe, they are also vulnerable to burnout, exhaustion, and ridicule as they navigate a host of other social challenges while doing this work that is poorly compensated. Hogan speaks with co-host Mike DiGirolamo about these challenges and the way forward for more inclusive movements while navigating the noise: “It's no accident that we spend so much of our time thinking about our individual lifestyles and not thinking about how [to] actually hold these systems accountable,” she says. Attention, Google Podcasts users—although that podcast provider is being closed by Alphabet, which is moving all podcasts to its YouTube Music service—you can find our show via any of the podcast apps, so please find and follow the Mongabay Newscast via any of those to not miss an episode! If you enjoy the show, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: Clover Hogan speaking in Paris, France. Photo courtesy of Clover Hogan. --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (02:10) Force of Nature (05:36) The challenges activists face (08:52) The myth of 'perfection' (16:50) Hostile environments (25:59) The most surprising 'confessions' of a climate activist (32:51) Throwing soup on paintings: helpful or harmful? (39:49) 'Hope' is a verb (43:53) Climate activism is an intersectional movement

Duration:00:51:01

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Jane Goodall on turning 90 and building empathy for nature

4/2/2024
On today's episode of the Newscast, world-renowned primatologist and conservation advocate Dr. Jane Goodall sits down with Mongabay founder and editor-in-chief, Rhett Butler. Goodall is celebrating her 90th birthday this week and reflects upon her long (and continuing) career, sharing reflections, lessons, stories and inspirations that guide her philosophy toward protecting the natural world. Widely recognized for her pioneering work on animal behavior, she explains the importance of having empathy for animals and why it is crucial for meeting conservation goals now and into the future. The iconic conservationist also shares why she thinks that, despite 'doom & gloom' news, humanity can overcome the adversity of its many environmental challenges. "I've come to think of humanity as being at the mouth of a very long very dark tunnel and right at the end there’s a little star shining. And that's hope. But it's no good sitting, wondering when that star will come to us...We must gird our loins, roll up our sleeves, and navigate around all obstacles that lie between us and the star." View a print version of this interview at the Mongabay website: https://news.mongabay.com/2024/04/jane-goodall-at-90-on-fame-hope-and-empathy/ Editor's Note: Jane Goodall is a member of Mongabay's advisory council. Subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever you get podcasts, and if you enjoy the show, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Feedback? Send a message to submissions@mongabay.com. Image credit: Photo of Jane Goodall by Rhett Butler/Mongabay. --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (04:09) Reflections on conservation and changes (05:04) How do you keep hopeful? (06:40) How can individuals make a positive impact? (08:36) How can people make their voices heard? (09:34) Ways to rally around nature (11:53) Why do you think people connect with your work? (20:08) Overlooked conservation solutions (22:29) The importance of empathy (27:44) Collaboration and hope in conservation (32:22) Choosing the impact we make

Duration:00:35:22

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Forest elephants, the endangered "gardeners" of the Congo Rainforest

3/26/2024
African forest elephants play a crucial role in shaping the Congo rainforest ecosystem, two experts explain on this episode. As seed dispersers and maintainers of forest corridors and clearings, they are sometimes referred to as "gardeners of the forest." Their small and highly threatened population needs additional study and conservation prioritization, since the loss of this species would fundamentally change the shape and structure of the world's second-largest rainforest. Guest Fiona "Boo" Maisels is a conservation scientist at the Wildlife Conservation Society, while Andrew Davies is assistant professor of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard University, and they speak with host Mike DiGirolamo about these charismatic mammals. Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: A calf attempts to sneak its trunk into a mineral pit that mom is drinking from. Protest calls are often heard from calves in this behavioral context, as mom sometimes pushes them away and they in turn express their displeasure with a little yell. Photo Ana Verahrami, Elephant Listening Project. --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (02:00) There are two African elephant species? (06:06) Can the "value" of an elephant be quantified? (19:30) The value of forest bais (27:25) Impacts of climate change (30:30) The future of forest elephants in the Congo Basin (38:44) Credits

Duration:00:38:43

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Show us the money: Are giant pledges by major conservation funders effective?

3/19/2024
Billionaires, foundations, and philanthropists often make massive, headline-grabbing pledges for biodiversity conservation or climate change mitigation, but how effective are these donations? How do these huge sums get used, and how do we know? These questions are among the considerations that conservationists and environmental reporters should keep in mind, two guest experts on this episode say. On this edition of the Mongabay Newscast, Holly Jonas, global coordinator of the ICCA Consortium, and Michael Kavate, staff writer at Inside Philanthropy, break down some of the more overlooked issues these giant gifts raise, and story angles that reporters should consider when covering philanthropy for the environment. "I think what the public really needs is more critical and in-depth coverage of the ideologies and the approaches behind their kinds of philanthropy, the billionaire pledges and so on, how they're being rolled out in practice, where the funding's actually going," says Jonas. Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: Great Green Macaw in Las Balsas reserve. Photo credit: José León. --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (01:55) Biggest trends in environmental philanthropy (07:23) Follow the money, follow the power (20:23) Tools and techniques for reporters (24:09) Localization & accountability (37:37) Funding transparency (53:25) Project finance for permanence (01:06:14) Western influence in philanthropy (01:13:37) Credits

Duration:01:15:33

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Cultural survival through reclaiming language and land, with author Jay Griffiths

3/12/2024
Today’s guest is Jay Griffiths, award-winning author of several books, including the acclaimed Wild: An Elemental Journey. She speaks with co-host Rachel Donald about the importance of language for preserving communities and their cultures, the impact of colonization and globalization on Indigenous communities, and the innate human connection with the natural world in the land of one's birth. Roughly 4,000 of the world’s 6,700 languages are spoken by Indigenous communities, but multiple factors (such as the decimation of human rights) continue to threaten their existence along with their speakers’ cultures. The guest also explores parallels between humans, nature and culture: “There’s great research that suggests that we learned ethics from wolves [by taking] an attitude to the world of both me the individual, and of me the pack member,” in caring for all members of the group, she says. Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: Kali Biru (Blue River) on Waigeo Island in Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia. Photo credit: Rhett Ayers Butler --- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (01:45) The power of language (09:03) Colonialism and globalization (17:40) The trickster in myth to modern governance (23:24) Reclaiming belonging (20:27) Championing Indigenous voices (34:45) Against mechanic modernity (40:35) West Papua, a brief explainer (46:22) Land and identity (51:50) A world of climate refugees

Duration:00:55:20

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Restoring an Irish rainforest by simply leaving nature alone

2/27/2024
Eoghan Daltun has spent the past 14 years restoring 75 acres of farmland in southwest Ireland to native forest, a wildly successful and inspirational effort that has welcomed back long-absent flora and fauna, which he details in his book, An Irish Atlantic Rainforest: A Personal Journey Into the Magic of Rewilding. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, host Rachel Donald speaks with Daltun about how easily he achieved this feat, its seemingly miraculous results, and the historical context behind the near-total ecological annihilation of Ireland, a country that today has only 11% forest cover. Daltun provides an honest but hopeful perspective on how humans can shift their relationship with nature and rekindle a powerful partnership with it. Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: Part of the guest's Irish Atlantic rainforest on the Beara Peninsula. Photo courtesy of Eoghan Daltun. --- Timecodes: (00:00) Introduction (01:14) Eoghan’s journey (05:55) Getting out of the way (10:42) Removing invasive species (13:50) What lies underneath (17:26) A connection with the land (22:48) A brutal history (29:22) Hope for the future (35:48) Reflections on forests (40:45) What is a temperate rainforest? (54:25) Credits

Duration:00:56:09

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Exploring a jewel of the Coral Triangle

2/20/2024
On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, host Mike DiGirolamo takes you on a journey through the most biodiverse marine region in the world, Raja Ampat. He speaks with three guests about how ecotourism has provided stable incomes through conservation, including documentary filmmaker Wahyu Mul, veteran birding guide Benny Mambrasar and resort owner Max Ammer, whose biological research center trains and employs local people in a variety of skills. Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, mongabay.com, or follow Mongabay on any of the social media platforms for updates. Image credit: Cape Kri, Sorido Bay Resort, Raja Ampat Regency, by Rhett Butler for Mongabay. ---- Timecodes (00:00) Introduction (02:20) The Role of Ecotourism in Raja Ampat (03:01) Wahyu Mul (10:03) The Raja Ampat Research and Conservation Centre (15:00) Max Ammer (39:36) Into the Forest - Benny Mambrasar (47:00) Threats of Development (52:47) Credits

Duration:00:54:37

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Is media objectivity possible during our environmental crisis?

2/13/2024
Objectivity is a pillar of journalism, but its definition and application are loosely defined and humanly impossible to achieve, experts say. Podcast guest Emily Atkin argues that an uncritical adherence to objectivity (over trust) has led to gaslighting readers about the real-world causes and urgency of the climate crisis. She quit her day job to launch the acclaimed newsletter “HEATED,” which was spurred by a desire to report on the human causes of climate change and ecological destruction more directly. She discusses why with host Rachel Donald on this episode. Subscribe to or follow the Mongabay Newscast wherever you get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, and you can also listen to all episodes here on the Mongabay website, or download our free app for Apple and Android devices to gain instant access to our latest episodes and all our previous ones. Image: An abstract AI-generated photo of a wildfire in the forest. Image from CharlVera via Pixabay. --- Timecodes: (00:00) Introduction (02:48) The Birth of Heated: A Climate Journalism Venture (05:19) The Challenges of Mainstream Media (14:17) The Role of Objectivity in Journalism (32:34) The Role of a Journalist and Power Dynamics (35:49) The Relationship Between Press and Government (38:48) The Role of Independent Journalism (47:33) Journalism Ethics (50:41) The Roots of Objectivity (01:00:35) Conclusion

Duration:01:02:45

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The many social and ecological benefits of a 'degrowth' world

1/30/2024
Can 'degrowth' solve our economic, social, and ecological problems? Economist Timothée Parrique thinks so. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, he joins co-host Rachel Donald to interrogate this 20+ year-old concept that critiques the notion of limitless growth in a finite world, and which offers tangible gains for people and planet. The current economic model stretches the ecological limits of the planet – the Planetary Boundaries. Parrique says degrowth is a pathway for rich countries to scale back production and consumption – much of which contributes nothing to human well-being, research indicates – making room for low and middle-income nations to raise their standards of living, while allowing natural systems to continue supporting the ecosystem services humanity needs, like clean air and water. Related reading: ‘It’s Not the End of the World’ book assumptions & omissions spark debate The nine boundaries humanity must respect to keep the planet habitable Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find and follow Mongabay on all the social media platforms. Image Caption: A bicycle lane in Fürth, Germany. Image by Markus Spiske via Unsplash. --- Timecodes: (00:00:00) Introduction (00:02:35) What is degrowth exactly? (00:07:46) Is 'decoupling' the answer? (00:12:52) Will 'limitless growth' improve quality of life? (00:18:23) Wasted GDP in the USA (00:25:28) Pushing the 'GDP button' (00:35:20) Implementing degrowth (00:47:57) A degrowth future (00:56:44) Rachel & Mike post-chat (01:12:45) Rachel asks Mike to imagine a day in a post-growth world (01:16:42) Credits

Duration:01:18:12

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Is "Not the End of the World" author's 'techno-realism' enough to solve our ecological problems?

1/16/2024
Data scientist and head of research at Our World in Data, Hannah Ritchie, says her 'radically hopeful' new book that's getting a lot of press, "Not the End of the World: How We Can be the First Generation to Build a Sustainable Planet," offers a pathway to solving the multiple environmental crises our world faces. However, co-host Rachel Donald finds that key geopolitical challenges are left unaddressed by the book, leaving out important frameworks such as the planetary boundaries, and attempts to ride an "apolitical" line on solutions that inherently need policy shifts in order to be effectively implemented. In this podcast interview, Donald challenges Ritchie on these questions and more. To hear specific topics discussed, refer to the chapter marks noted below. Related reading at Mongabay: The nine boundaries humanity must respect to keep the planet habitable Mongabay Series: Planetary Boundaries Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple Store or Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find and follow Mongabay on all the social media platforms. Episode artwork by Pawel Czerwinski via Unsplash. --- Timecodes: (00:00:00) - Introduction (00:03:57) - Renewable Energy and Political Will (00:07:06) - Realism of Tech Solutions (00:09:03) - Degrowth & Decoupling (00:17:33) - Doomerism, Inequality & Politics (00:28:45) - How does a transition happen? (00:36:51) - Hannah defends terminology used in the book (00:44:58) - Deforestation (00:53:11) - Our World In Data & Bias (01:06:19) - Mike & Rachel post-chat (01:26:19) - Credits

Duration:01:28:02

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When independent journalism exposes crimes against people and planet

1/9/2024
In 2015, independent journalist Clare Rewcastle Brown and Sarawak Report uncovered the beginnings of what is now considered the world’s biggest money-laundering scandal. The crime resulted in billions stolen from the 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) fund. While former prime minister Najib Razak is now facing a 12-year prison sentence for his role in the crime, Rewcastle Brown herself has also faced legal actions against her, including an arrest warrant and an attempt to place her on Interpol’s Red Notice list of wanted fugitives. Mongabay podcast co-host Rachel Donald speaks with Rewcastle Brown, the founder of the Sarawak Report, about what led her to investigate this scandal, as well as environmental destruction in Borneo. Related reading: Amid corruption scandal, Malaysia switches track on future of rail network INTERPOL rejects Malaysia’s request to place journalist on Red Notice list Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find and follow Mongabay on all the social media platforms. Image Caption: Kelumpang Sarawak (Sterculia megistophylla) in Malaysian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

Duration:00:49:09