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St. Louis on the Air

News & Politics Podcasts

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air host Sarah Fenske brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air host Sarah Fenske brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

Location:

St. Louis, MO

Description:

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air host Sarah Fenske brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

Twitter:

@STLonAir

Language:

English

Contact:

3651 Olive St. St. Louis, MO 63108 (314) 382-8255


Episodes

Veteran Chef Who Quit Food Service Industry Says It Needs To Evolve

5/11/2021
Restaurateurs across the region are grappling with staff shortages. Former chef Patrick Tague, who spent about 30 years in the industry, hopes that the demand for workers will lead to a kinder, gentler culture for food service workers, and more jobs with employee benefits like health insurance.

Duration:00:13:50

Critical Race Theory Seeks To Tell ‘A More Accurate Story,’ Supporters Say

5/11/2021
At a time when opinions about critical race theory and inclusive pedagogy are loud and manifold, two experts from Webster University offer a closer look at what critical race theory is — and what to make of the controversy surrounding it.

Duration:00:21:52

Alex And Carly Garcia Open Up About ‘Having My Best Friend All Over Again’

5/11/2021
In late February, Honduran immigrant and longtime Missourian Alex Garcia left the Maplewood church where he'd been living in sanctuary for 1,252 days. He and his wife, Carly, join host Sarah Fenske to discuss their reunited life and remaining challenges ahead.

Duration:00:16:29

Opera Theatre Of St. Louis On Its Sold-Out 2021 Season — And That Pandemic Parenting Opera

5/10/2021
Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ sold-out 2021 season moves outdoors for the first time. Among its world premieres: A timely comic opera about parenting in a pandemic

Duration:00:25:27

Shankar Vedantam Of 'Hidden Brain' On The ‘Useful Delusions’ That Sustain Humanity

5/10/2021
We talk with "Hidden Brain" host Shankar Vedantam, His new book is "Useful Delusions: The Power & Paradox of the Self-Deceiving Brain."

Duration:00:27:28

St. Louis Muslims Find New Ways To Celebrate Ramadan During Pandemic

5/7/2021
Last year, COVID-19 restrictions put a damper on festivities. But this year, precautions and vaccines helped return a sense of normalcy to the religious traditions. Producer Lara Hamdan checks in with local Muslims to hear how they are observing Ramadan.

Duration:00:15:09

How St. Louis Journalists Kept Print Alive As Pandemic Raged

5/7/2021
The Webster-Kirkwood Times and the Riverfront Times faced an uncertain future last March. As the coronavirus spread across the U.S., management at both newspapers sought to suspend print editions. Journalists from both organizations share how they battled back from the brink.

Duration:00:27:52

Revival Runway Connects Refugee Teens With The Fashion Industry

5/6/2021
Aloha Mischeaux, program director of Revival Runway, shares details about the new collaborative group where local models, photographers and designers mentor refugee students interested in the fashion industry.

Duration:00:10:35

Tracing St. Louis Activists' Evolving Fight For Black Lives And Police Reform

5/6/2021
Rebecca Rivas' new two-part series looks and how and why Ferguson activists gave up trying to reform local police departments and decided instead to take control of them. They’ve found huge political success in the last five years.

Duration:00:17:21

‘It’s A Reckoning’: Restaurateurs Grapple With Staff Shortages As Customers Return

5/6/2021
Restaurants across the metro continue to reopen and expand their service as diners return to restaurants. There’s just one problem: They can’t find enough good help. St. Louis Magazine’s George Mahe and Tom Schmidt of Salt + Smoke join us to discuss what's going on.

Duration:00:24:10

In ‘Snow Blind,’ St. Louisan Finds Path Forward After Losing Sight In Random Shooting

5/5/2021
Thirty years ago this summer, an act of random violence stole William Johnson’s eyesight, and the lives of two of his colleagues, during a business trip to Atlanta. Johnson describes what happened — and how he adapted to his new reality in the months and years that followed his return home to St. Louis — in his new memoir.

Duration:00:22:50

Newly Inaugurated Chancellor Discusses Program Cuts, State Of Higher Ed And Why She’s Hopeful About UMSL’s Future

5/5/2021
Chancellor Kristin Sobolik joins host Sarah Fenske to share her vision for the University of Missouri-St. Louis as well as her perspective on some of the biggest challenges currently facing UMSL and higher education as a whole.

Duration:00:21:52

How Pickleball Took St. Louis By Storm

5/4/2021
Pickleball has seen explosive growth in the St. Louis metro. Certified instructor Mike Chapin explains how he brought the first permanent courts here and why demand shows no signs of lessening.

Duration:00:21:31

Rockwood Controversy Spurs GOP Push To Ban Critical Race Theory In Schools

5/4/2021
A proposal introduced by Missouri Republicans — and its roots within a debate raging among teachers, administrators and parents within the Rockwood School District — is the subject of Tony Messenger’s latest column, “Missouri Republicans embrace racism and censorship in trying to ban the 1619 Project.”

Duration:00:30:35

One Year In, St. Louis County Police Chief Barton Defends Her Record On Race

5/3/2021
STLPR reporter Rachel Lippmann spoke with Chief Mary Barton about her controversial tenure. Hear most of that conversation.

Duration:00:12:08

Pernicious Effects Of Racially Restrictive Housing Covenants Still Felt Today

5/3/2021
Though racially restrictive covenants have been illegal for more than 70 years, their impact can still be felt today. That’s the focus of a new paper by Colin Gordon in the Journal of Urban History.

Duration:00:25:34

How St. Louis Nearly Became The Nation’s Capital

5/3/2021
In the 1860s, a plan to move the U.S. Capitol from D.C. to St. Louis garnered substantial support. Journalist Livia Gershon gives a crash course in this long-forgotten history.

Duration:00:14:36

How A ‘Small Object With A Large Story’ Traveled From A Concentration Camp To St. Louis

4/30/2021
As a 14-year-old imprisoned in a satellite camp to Auschwitz in 1944, Ben Fainer crafted a bracelet engraved with his name, his ID number and some decorative elements. We explore Fainer's story and how the bracelet made it's way to St. Louis.

Duration:00:31:20

This Week's Friday Legislative Roundup With The Missouri Independent

4/30/2021
Missouri Independent editor-in-chief Jason Hancock explains what’s happening in the Missouri legislature. The discussion delves into various topics, including the decision to not fund Medicaid expansion, COVID-19 liability and vaccine passports.

Duration:00:20:33

‘Lights Out Heartland’ Aims To Keep Migrating Songbirds Flying Safe Over St. Louis

4/29/2021
When migrating songbirds get to a major city like St. Louis, light pollution can cause them to become disoriented or exhausted, and sometimes die. A new effort seeks to address the problem by encouraging businesses and individuals in the Midwest to turn off exterior lights during May and September.

Duration:00:20:36