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On each episode of Parts Per Billion, we’ll feature interesting environmental policy discussions about what’s happening in Congress, in the courts and in federal agencies. We’ll cover everything from air pollution to toxic chemicals to corporate sustainability and, of course, climate change.

On each episode of Parts Per Billion, we’ll feature interesting environmental policy discussions about what’s happening in Congress, in the courts and in federal agencies. We’ll cover everything from air pollution to toxic chemicals to corporate sustainability and, of course, climate change.
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United States

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On each episode of Parts Per Billion, we’ll feature interesting environmental policy discussions about what’s happening in Congress, in the courts and in federal agencies. We’ll cover everything from air pollution to toxic chemicals to corporate sustainability and, of course, climate change.

Language:

English


Episodes

Bees Are Big Business, Believe It or Not

5/17/2019
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Bees are a symbol of industriousness, but they've also been the cause of no small amount of panic in recent years amid reports that the flying honey makers may be going extinct. We took a deep dive into these issues with our new special podcast series, Business of Bees, and its producers join Parts Per Billion to talk about what they’ve learned. Host: David Schultz. Producers: Marissa Horn and Jessica Coomes.

Duration:00:13:03

Action on Climate in House, But Not Enough for Some

5/8/2019
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The House passed its first major climate change bill in a decade last week, but few environmentalists are cheering. Bloomberg Environment's Tiffany Stecker joins Parts Per Billion to talk about where Congress is at on climate change and where it may be heading in the months and years to come. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Jessica Coomes, Marissa Horn. Listen and subscribe to Parts Per Billion from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via Overcast | Via Stitcher | Via Spotify

Duration:00:09:58

Forget Carbon Neutral, Let's Go Carbon Negative

4/22/2019
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Scientists have developed ways to suck greenhouse gasses out of the atmosphere. So climate change is solved then, right? Bloomberg Environment's Abby Smith tells us why this technology isn't yet ready for widespread use and why the government's policies toward what some call "carbon capture" aren't totally coherent right now. Host: David Schultz Editors: Jessica Coomes, Marissa Horn

Duration:00:10:23

Saving Water—and Money—With the Power of Plumbing

4/3/2019
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San Antonio's water utility has discovered a way to help its low-income residents and simultaneously conserve water: it sends a plumber out to their house, for free. On the latest episode of Parts Per Billion, we speak with the official who runs this program in San Antonio to learn about the intersection of water affordability and water conservation.

Duration:00:09:17

The Pro-Tax, Anti-Climate Denialism Republican

3/19/2019
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Alex Flint believes climate change is real and the best way to deal with it is to raise taxes on carbon emissions. He's also a Republican. On this episode of Parts Per Billion, we speak with Flint about how a carbon tax would work, how it could appeal to conservatives, and why he thinks the carbon tax in the Democrats' Green New Deal won't become a reality.

Duration:00:16:06

How to Sell a Power Plant No One Wants to Buy

3/6/2019
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The owners of Arizona's Navajo Generating Station are having a hard time finding someone who wants to take the power plant off their hands before its lease expires at the end of the year. But while few if any want to buy the plant, there lots of people who don't want to see it close. Bloomberg Environment's Stephen Lee joins us to talk about why the future of the largest coal-fired power plant west of the Mississippi is so uncertain. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Marissa Horn and Jessica...

Duration:00:11:29

Regulatory Future Murky for 'Forever Chemicals'

2/22/2019
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Bloomberg Environment's Sylvia Carignan joins Parts Per Billion to talk about the future of PFAS, also known as "forever chemicals," a family of man-made substances that have been found in groundwater across the country and have been linked to numerous health problems. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Marissa Horn and Jessica Coomes.

Duration:00:09:24

Wheeler Likely to Breeze Through Senate

2/1/2019
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The President wants Andrew Wheeler to be the permanent chief of the EPA, but first he'll have to get through the Senate. Bloomberg Environment's Dean Scott joins us to talk about how Wheeler's nomination will almost certainly succeed, although the vote may be pretty close. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Jessica Coomes and Marissa Horn.

Duration:00:09:21

Wheeler Likely to Breeze Through Senate

1/31/2019
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The President wants Andrew Wheeler to be the permanent chief of the EPA, but first he'll have to get through the Senate. Bloomberg Environment's Dean Scott joins us to talk about how Wheeler's nomination will almost certainly succeed, although the vote may be pretty close. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Jessica Coomes and Marissa Horn.

Duration:00:09:22

Mercury Rising in Debate Over EPA Mercury Limits

1/24/2019
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Mercury's not just for thermometers anymore—it also comes out of power plants. Bloomberg Environment's Amena Saiyid joins us to talk about what the EPA is doing about mercury pollution from power plants and which special interests are pushing the agency which way on this issue. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Marissa Horn and Jessica Coomes.

Duration:00:07:47

Mercury Rising in Debate Over EPA Pollution Limits

1/23/2019
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Mercury's not just for thermometers anymore—it also comes out of power plants. Bloomberg Environment's Amena Saiyid joins us to talk about what the EPA is doing about mercury pollution from power plants and which special interests are pushing the agency which way on this issue. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Marissa Horn and Jessica Coomes.

Duration:00:07:47

No Clear Path Forward on Climate After Poland

1/8/2019
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The United Nations’ recent climate change conference in Poland didn’t yield much in the way of breakthroughs. That raises the question: How long before catastrophic climate impacts become unavoidable? Bloomberg Environment’s Bobby Magill joins us on our podcast to summarize what went down in Poland and what that means for how the world will respond to global climate change. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Jessica Coomes and Marissa Horn.

Duration:00:15:08

The Surprisingly Sturdy Legacy of Ryan Zinke

12/20/2018
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Ryan Zinke is gone from President Trump's cabinet, but Bloomberg Environment's Stephen Lee says he won't soon be forgotten. Lee joins us to talk about the long-lasting consequences of Zinke's 22 months atop the Department of the Interior, and who may potentially be his successor. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Jessica Coomes and Marissa Horn.

Duration:00:10:43

The EPA’s Disastrous Disaster Response

12/13/2018
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How well did the EPA handle last year’s hurricanes and wildfires? Bloomberg Environment reporter Sylvia Carignan found a copy of the agency’s “warts and all” self-assessment of its disaster response, and she said it contains a lot of warts. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Jessica Coomes and Marissa Horn.

Duration:00:09:43

UN's Climate Conference Convenes in Poland, and So Do We

12/5/2018
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The UN's 24th annual climate change conference begins in Poland this week amid increasing signs that a global environmental catastrophe is afoot. Bloomberg Environment's Bobby Magill is there and he spoke with the head of the UN's General Assembly about what needs to happen to fix this problem, or at least prevent it from getting significantly worse. Host: David Schultz. Producer: Jessica Coomes. Editor: Marissa Horn.

Duration:00:13:46

Talking Pesticides on Turkey Day

11/21/2018
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Just in time for Thanksgiving, we have Bloomberg Environment’s Tiffany Stecker on to talk about the pesticides that might be in your food. Specifically, she talks about a particularly potent bug-killing chemical that hasn’t gone away in the developing world, even though the U.S., Europe, and other developed areas have largely declared it unsafe. Host: David Schultz. Editors: Marissa Horn and Jessica Coomes.

Duration:00:10:28

New Congress Will Bring Oversight, Policy Changes

11/7/2018
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Congress will look very different when it gavels in next year with a new House Democratic Majority and an expanded Republican Senate. On this special post-election episode of "Suspending the Rules," our reporters and legislative analysts break down the implications of a divided Congress for a variety of key issues. In this episode: • Bloomberg Government senior congressional reporter Nancy Ognanovich dives into the election returns and dynamics in the new Congress. • Bloomberg Government...

Duration:00:31:03

Tiny Power Plants, Tiny Chemicals & Tiny Plaintiffs

11/6/2018
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On this week's episode of our weekly podcast, Parts Per Billion, we get small: small power plants, small amounts of chemicals in your breakfast, and an update on a lawsuit from some small people. Bloomberg Environment's Adam Allington and Bobby Magill join us to discuss the future of coal and the future of litigation that could change the way the government addresses climate change. Host: David Schultz Producers: Jessica Coomes & Marissa Horn

Duration:00:05:43

Are You Smarter Than an Environmental Reporter?

10/31/2018
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This week, we introduce a new segment on our weekly environmental policy podcast, Parts Per Billion: a news quiz where you can test your knowledge of current events against Bloomberg Environment’s finest journalists. We also hear from one of those journalists, climate reporter Abby Smith, about an on-again-off-again lawsuit from a group of young people who are arguing that the government has a constitutional duty to combat climate change. Host: David Schultz. Producer: Jessica Coomes.

Duration:00:08:46

The New Gold Rush 3 Miles Under the Ocean

10/12/2018
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The conditions may finally be right for deep sea mining. Demand for rare minerals is peaking thanks to consumer electronics, and technology has developed enough that drilling three miles underwater can be done safely. Or can it? This week on Parts Per Billion, Bloomberg Environment's Adam Allington tells us about why some environmentalists and scientists think mining isn't actually better down where it's wetter. Host: David Schultz Editors: Marissa Horn & Nicholas Anzalotta-Kynoch Producers:...

Duration:00:10:51