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RightsUp: The Oxford Human Rights Hub Podcast

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RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions. RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann. (This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)

Location:

United States

Genres:

News

Description:

RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions. RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann. (This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)

Language:

English


Episodes

Discrimination Law - Part 1

3/1/2024
In this episode, we are exploring some of the key themes in Professor Sandra Fredman’s monograph, Discrimination Law – the new, third edition of which was published by Oxford University Press in December 2022. Sandra Fredman FBA KC is Professor of the Laws of the British Commonwealth and the USA at Oxford University, a fellow of Pembroke College Oxford, and Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub. She is joined in conversation by Rosalie Abella, formerly a Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada; Jayna Kothari, a Senior Advocate in the Supreme Court of India; and Helen Mountfield KC, a barrister practising at Matrix Chambers in the UK and Principal of Mansfield College Oxford.

Duration:00:43:23

A Historic Moment: Indian Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Decision

1/22/2024
In October 2023, a historic decision was made by the Indian Supreme Court that held that there was no fundamental right to marry, denying the legal recognition for same-sex marriage in India under the Special Marriage Act. Frances Hand sat down with Devina Malaviya, to discuss the intricacies of this case Supriyo v. Union of India. Devina Malaviya is an Assistant Professor of Legal Practice and Assistant Dean in Clinical Legal Education at O.P. Jindal Global University. Devina's interests lie in the area of family law, constitutional law and criminal law. After graduating from National Law University in Delhi in 2016, she worked as a law clerk, cum research assistant with Justice Kurian Joseph at the Supreme Court of India.

Duration:00:30:15

Catherine Briddick on the UK Rwanda Decision

12/5/2023
Vox pops on key human rights issues with human rights experts. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website (ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/).

Duration:00:09:56

Cathryn Costello on the UK Immigration Bill

3/24/2023
Vox pops on key human rights issues with human rights experts. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website (ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/).

Duration:00:15:40

Gendered Constitutionalism

1/24/2023
In this week's episode, we talk to Ruth Rubio, Professor in the School of Transnational Governance at the European University Institute, about her book, Global Gender Constitutionalism and Women’s Citizenship: A Struggle for Transformative Inclusion, published by Cambridge University Press (ISBN: 9781316630303). Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Duration:00:29:16

Protests in Iran and Human Rights

1/12/2023
In this episode, we spoke to Dr. Saeed Bagheri, lecturer of International Law at the University of Reading about the women-led protests in Iran, sparked in response to the arrest of Mahsa Amini by the morality police and her subsequent death. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Duration:00:22:34

A Conversation with Justice Majiedt of the South African Constitutional Court

12/1/2022
In this episode, we speak to Justice Steven Majiedt of the Constitutional Court of South Africa on the unique history of South African constitutionalism, whether the constitution can bring about transformation and the future of socio-economic rights protection in light of COVID and the cost-of-living crisis.

Duration:00:50:00

The Cost of Living Crisis and Human Rights

11/9/2022
In this episode we spoke to Allison Corkery and María Emilia Mamberti at the Centre for Economic and Social Rights about what human rights bring to the current cost of living crisis.

Duration:00:37:48

Gauri Pillai on the Indian Abortion Decision

10/11/2022
Vox pops on key human rights issues with human rights experts. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website (https://ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/).

Duration:00:12:04

Dobbs v Jackson: A Role for Equality?

8/4/2022
In this episode we speak to Professor Julie Suk about applying an equality lens to the right to abortion in light of the recent US Supreme Court ruling in Dobbs v Jackson. What do equality arguments bring? Is the US Constitution's understanding of equality helpful in grounding a right to an abortion? And if not, are there alternate constitutional pathways available to the Court? Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Duration:00:25:55

A Historic Moment: The Drafting of the New Chilean Constitution

7/22/2022
In advance of a nationwide referendum on the new draft Chilean Constitution, scheduled for the 4th of September, Gautam Bhatia interviews Professor Roberto Gargarella about the writing of this Constitution, its place in the history of Latin American constitutionalism, and the reasons why the draft Constitution deserves to be supported. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Duration:00:21:35

RightsUp Pops: Stéphanie Hennette-Vauchez on the Burkini judgment

7/5/2022
Vox pops on key human rights issues with human rights experts. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website (https://ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/).

Duration:00:10:11

Episode Four- “…that’s the key question”: Institutional Responsibility for Inequality

6/27/2022
We ask human rights experts who has ultimate responsibility for protecting the most vulnerable in times of crisis. This is the final episode of a four-part series. The series takes a deep dive into whether equality law is cut out to protect the most vulnerable in times of crisis, and if not, then why not and what can we do about it? This podcast series is part of the Exponential Inequalities project, led by Shreya Atrey as the Principal Investigator of the British Academy Leverhulme Small Research Grant on Equality Law in Times of Crisis. Transcript and show notes available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website at ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk. Producer, Presenter, Sound Editor: Christy Callaway-Gale Executive Producers: Shreya Atrey, Meghan Campbell, Sandra Fredman Assistant Producers: Mónica Arango Olaya, Gauri Pillai, Natasha Holcroft-Emmess Transcript and show notes: Sarah Dobbie Music: Rosemary Allmann

Duration:00:23:58

Episode Three- “...plug those gaps”: Reforms to Equality Law

6/20/2022
Human rights experts reveal how we could reform equality law to make sure it protects the most vulnerable in times of crisis. This is Episode Three of a four-part series. The series takes a deep dive into whether equality law is cut out to protect the most vulnerable in times of crisis, and if not, then why not and what can we do about it? This podcast series is part of the Exponential Inequalities project, led by Shreya Atrey as the Principal Investigator of the British Academy Leverhulme Small Research Grant on Equality Law in Times of Crisis. Transcript and show notes available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website at ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk. Producer, Presenter, Sound Editor: Christy Callaway-Gale Executive Producers: Shreya Atrey, Meghan Campbell, Sandra Fredman Assistant Producers: Mónica Arango Olaya, Gauri Pillai, Natasha Holcroft-Emmess Transcript and show notes: Sarah Dobbie Music: Rosemary Allmann

Duration:00:19:18

Episode Two- “…patriarchal mentality”: The Functioning of Equality Law in Crisis.

6/13/2022
Human rights experts help us determine whether equality law is set up to protect the most vulnerable in times of crisis. This is Episode Two of a four-part series. The series takes a deep dive into whether equality law is cut out to protect the most vulnerable in times of crisis, and if not, then why not and what can we do about it? This podcast series is part of the Exponential Inequalities project, led by Shreya Atrey as the Principal Investigator of the British Academy Leverhulme Small Research Grant on Equality Law in Times of Crisis. Transcript and show notes available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website at ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk. Producer, Presenter, Sound Editor: Christy Callaway-Gale Executive Producers: Shreya Atrey, Meghan Campbell, Sandra Fredman Assistant Producers: Mónica Arango Olaya, Gauri Pillai, Natasha Holcroft-Emmess Transcript and show notes: Sarah Dobbie Music: Rosemary Allmann

Duration:00:21:33

Episode One- “I can hear another ambulance”: The Rise of Exponential Inequalities During COVID-19

6/6/2022
Human rights experts tell stories of inequalities from around the world, revealing how these inequalities have been exacerbated during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. This is Episode One of a four-part series. The series takes a deep dive into whether equality law is cut out to protect the most vulnerable in times of crisis, and if not, then why not and what can we do about it? This podcast series is part of the Exponential Inequalities project, led by Shreya Atrey as the Principal Investigator of the British Academy Leverhulme Small Research Grant on Equality Law in Times of Crisis. Transcript and show notes available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website at ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk. Producer, Presenter, Sound Editor: Christy Callaway-Gale Executive Producers: Shreya Atrey, Meghan Campbell, Sandra Fredman Assistant Producers: Mónica Arango Olaya, Gauri Pillai, Natasha Holcroft-Emmess Transcript and show notes: Sarah Dobbie Music: Rosemary Allmann

Duration:00:18:49

Spotlight on an understudied institution: evictions and the Magistrate's Court in South Africa

6/2/2022
Evictions constitute gross violations of a range of internationally recognised human rights, including the rights to adequate housing, food, water, health, education, work, security of the person, security of the home, freedom from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, and freedom of movement. Evictions intensify inequality, segregation and ghettoization, and invariably affect the poorest, most socially and economically vulnerable and marginalised. In this episode, we speak to Nerishka Singh, a researcher at the Socio-Economic Rights Institute of South Africa (SERI), and Timothy Fish Hodgson, Legal Advisor to the International Commission of Jurists on Economic, Social and Cultural rights in Africa, about eviction cases before the Magistrate’s Courts in Johannesburg, South Africa. The Magistrate’s Courts fall lowest in the hierarchy of courts in South Africa, but are most accessible to the public, and yet these are least studied by researchers. This podcast delves into cutting-edge research by SERI on how the constitutional requirements of the right to adequate housing and right against arbitrary evictions under s 26 of the South African Constitution are implemented by the Magistrate’s Courts. Recorded August 2019. Transcript available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website (ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk).

Duration:00:21:22

The Free Speech Crisis in Universities

9/14/2021
In this episode, Gauri Pillai, Managing Editor of the Oxford Human Rights Hub, speaks to Professor Adrienne Stone, Director of the Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies at Melbourne Law School and Professor Eric Heinze, Professor of Law and Humanities, Queen Mary University of London on the human rights implications of the alleged free speech crisis in university campuses.

Duration:00:51:31

Understanding Institutional Racism: A Response to the Sewell Report (with Shreya Atrey)

4/13/2021
In this episode, Seun Matiluko, a journalist and a current BCL student at Oxford Law Faculty, speaks with Dr Shreya Atrey, an Associate Professor in International Human Rights Law at Oxford's Department for Continuing Education and Faculty of Law, about a recent report from the UK Government's newly formed Commission for Race and Ethnic Disparities. Hosted and recorded by: Seun Matiluko Edited by: Christy Callaway-Gale Produced by: Gauri Pillai Executive producer: Kira Allmann Show notes by: Sarah Dobbie Music by: Rosemary Allmann Additional thanks to: Sandra Fredman and Megan Campbell Full transcript available at: http://ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/ This episode is released under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives Creative Commons license. This allows you to republish the episode, but you must credit RightsUp and The Oxford Human Rights Hub.

Duration:00:25:42

Gender in Colombia's Peace Transition (with Isabel Jaramillo Sierra)

2/12/2021
In this episode, we speak with Dr Isabel Cristina Jaramillo from Los Andes University in Colombia about “Gender in Transition: Studies about the Role of the Law in the Distribution of Resources for Implementing the Transition in Colombia after the Peace Agreement." We explore what gender has meant during Colombia's transition to peace and reconciliation and what the peace agreement has meant to the construction of Colombian feminisms. Hosted and recorded by: Mónica Arango Olaya Edited by: Christy Callaway-Gale Co-produced by: Mónica Arango Olaya Executive producer: Kira Allmann Show notes by: Sarah Dobbie Music by: Rosemary Allmann Additional thanks to: Sandra Fredman, Megan Campbell, Gauri Pillai, and Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

Duration:00:32:49