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American Indian Airwaves

Podcasts

American Indian Airwaves, an Indigenous public affairs radio and, perhaps, the longest running Native American radio programs within both Indigenous and the United States broadcast communication histories, broadcast weekly every Thursday from 7pm to 8pm (PCT) on KPFK FM 90.7 Los Angeles (http://www.kpfk.org). Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aiacr American Indian Airwaves is produced in Burntswamp Studio and started broadcasting on March 1st, 1973 in order to give Indigenous peoples and their respective first nations a voice about the continuous struggles against Settler Colonialism and Imperialism by the occupying and settler societies often referred to as the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Latin and South America countries located therein. American Indian Airwaves operates as an all-volunteer collective with no corporate sponsorship and no underwriters.

American Indian Airwaves, an Indigenous public affairs radio and, perhaps, the longest running Native American radio programs within both Indigenous and the United States broadcast communication histories, broadcast weekly every Thursday from 7pm to 8pm (PCT) on KPFK FM 90.7 Los Angeles (http://www.kpfk.org). Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aiacr American Indian Airwaves is produced in Burntswamp Studio and started broadcasting on March 1st, 1973 in order to give Indigenous peoples and their respective first nations a voice about the continuous struggles against Settler Colonialism and Imperialism by the occupying and settler societies often referred to as the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Latin and South America countries located therein. American Indian Airwaves operates as an all-volunteer collective with no corporate sponsorship and no underwriters.

Location:

United States

Genres:

Podcasts

Description:

American Indian Airwaves, an Indigenous public affairs radio and, perhaps, the longest running Native American radio programs within both Indigenous and the United States broadcast communication histories, broadcast weekly every Thursday from 7pm to 8pm (PCT) on KPFK FM 90.7 Los Angeles (http://www.kpfk.org). Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aiacr American Indian Airwaves is produced in Burntswamp Studio and started broadcasting on March 1st, 1973 in order to give Indigenous peoples and their respective first nations a voice about the continuous struggles against Settler Colonialism and Imperialism by the occupying and settler societies often referred to as the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Latin and South America countries located therein. American Indian Airwaves operates as an all-volunteer collective with no corporate sponsorship and no underwriters.

Language:

English


Episodes

The 28th Anniversary of the EZLN’s Indigenous Resistance, Self-Determination, & Successes in Chiapas

1/8/2022
Today on American Indian Airwaves, we recognize, celebrate, and reflect on the January 1st, 1994, historical event when the Zapatistas declared war on the Mexican government on behalf of the country’s indigenous people suffering from perpetual state and organized criminal violence throughout the Chiapas, Mexico region. Launched on the same day of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that went into effect, the EZLN seized government offices and occupied thousands of acres of...

Duration:00:58:49

Remembering William Yellow Robe Jr.: Sacred Stage: Talks with Native Playwrights and Artists

12/30/2021
“Sacred Stage: Talks with Native Playwrights and Artists” is an in-depth series of interviews with Indigenous activist, artist, actors/actresses, playwrights and more about their legacy work and how their activism intersects with Indigeneity and the contribution across and within Indigenous and non-Indigenous arts. Today’s program is in remembrance and honoring of William Yellow Robe Jr. (Assiniboine and Sioux Nations located at the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in Montana). He was a prolific...

Duration:00:59:31

Wounded Knee: Spirit, Resistance, and Remembrance

12/25/2021
December 29th of this year marks the 131st memorial and remembrance of the Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890 where the United States Calvary followed several ghost dancers and community members to Wounded Knee, opened-fired, and killed over 300 indigenous men, women and children. More than 80 later, the struggle continued at Wounded Knee from February 27th, 1973 to May 8th, 1973 when over 200 members of the American Indian Movement (AIM) and their supporters occupied Wounded Knee at Pine Ridge,...

Duration:00:58:01

Rejecting False Apologies: What Truth & Healing Means and the COVID-19 Pandemic’s Impact

12/25/2021
Valentin Lopez, Amah Mutsun Nation, is Chairman of the Amah Mutsun Nation, one of three historic California Indigenous Nations that are recognized as Ohlone. Valentin is Mutsun, Awaswas, Chumash and Yokuts (http://amahmutsun.org/governance/tribal-council) and he joins us for the entire program to discuss what California Governor Newsom’s Executive Order #1519 (https://www.gov.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/6.18.19-Executive-Order.pdf), a soft public apology “on behalf of California to...

Duration:00:58:09

The National Day Mourning & Dismantling the Thanksgiving Day Holiday

11/24/2021
Today on American Indian Airwaves we hear from two distinguished Indigenous elders on the National Day of Mourning first established in 1970. Both guest, Georgianna Sanchez (Chumash Nation), elder, cultural bearer, and scholar; and George “Tink” Tinker (Osage Nation), elder, cultural bearer, and scholar at the Iliff School of Theology, address the National Day of Mourning, what the settler colonial violent holiday, Thanksgiving Day, means to them, and what are Indigenous peoples’...

Duration:00:57:55

Manzanar Diverted: When Water Become Dust: From Payahuunadu (Owens Valley, CA) to Tongva (LA)

10/28/2021
Parts 1 and 2: From the majestic peaks of the snow-capped Sierras to the parched valley of Payahuunadü, “the land of flowing water,” (Owens Valley, CA) Manzanar Diverted: When Water Become Dust is a brand new film recounting more than 150 years of history, showing how Payahuunadu (Owens Valley, CA) is tied to the city of Los Angeles and how the forced removals of two peoples -the Nüümü (Paiute) and the Newe (Shoshone) who were marched out of the Valley in the 1860s and the Japanese Americans...

Duration:00:57:23

Protecting Chi’chil Bildagoteel (Oak Flat): The Apache Stronghold Spiritual Convoy

10/21/2021
Part 1: In 2015 the United States congress passed the annual National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which included the rider: The Southeastern Arizona Land Exchange and Conservation Act 2014 (“Act”). The “Act” will grant Resolution Copper, a joint venture between Rio Tinto and BHP, the 2,200 acres located in the Tonto National Forest in Arizona. If Resolution Copper succeeds in completing the land transfer, they will build one of the largest open ore and copper mining pits in the world,...

Duration:00:57:56

Indigenous Peoples Day as Performative, Disability and Indigenous Justice Intersections

10/16/2021
Part 1: United States President Biden recently, simultaneously, and problematically signed to the Indigenous Peoples Day and Columbus Day Proclamations. While Columbus Day is also a form of state-sponsored hate speech, acknowledging Indigenous peoples in the same breath is questionably troublesome. Has the settler colonial attention and support of Indigenous Peoples Day resulted in more performative gestures in the politics of inclusion? Meanwhile, Indigenous communities and nations remained...

Duration:00:58:28

Reclaiming & Renaming Patrick’s Point State Park to Sue-meg State Park & Indigenous Education

9/23/2021
Part 1: The California State Parks is currently seeking public feedback on a proposal to change the name of Patrick’s Point State Park in Humboldt County to Sue-meg State Park, the original place name for the area by the Yurok peoples since time immemorial. Patrick’s Point State Park was acquired by the California State Parks in 1930 with the place name of Patrick’s Point already in use, dating back to the mid-1800s in reference to a homesteader, Patrick Beegan, a notorious and complicit...

Duration:00:58:32

Sacred Stage: Talks with Native Playwrights and Artists with Opalanietet

9/16/2021
“Sacred Stage: Talks with Native Playwrights and Artists” – an in-depth series of interviews with Indigenous activist, artist, actors/actresses, playwrights and more about their legacy work and how their activism intersects with Indigeneity and the contribution across and within Indigenous and non-Indigenous arts. Special Guest Co-Host for today is Albert “Abby” Ybarra (Yaqui Nation). Guest: Ryan Victor Pierce, "Opalanietet," is a member of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Nation of New Jersey....

Duration:00:58:39

Mauna Kea & the NSF, State Violence, Targeting Elders, Militarization, & Tourism Escalates COVID-19

9/2/2021
Liko Martin and Laulani Teale (Hawaiian Nation). Liko Martin, Haku Mele, is one of Hawai’i’s renowned songwriters and activist; founder and co-founder of many Indigenous organizations; a farmer, fisherman, cultural practitioner, peacemaker and veteran; a Kupuna Advisor for Ho’opae Pono Peace Project, plus more. Laulani Teale is a musician, artist, cultural practitioner, public health practitioner, web/social media developer, and coordinator for the Ho’opae Pono Peace Project, plus more. Liko...

Duration:00:58:57

Organized Criminal Syndicate Wars: Indigenous Peoples in Chiapas in the Crossfire

8/26/2021
In Chiapas, Mexico, the territorial divisions between the major drug cartels have broken down resulting in open warfare which has spread to spread to Chiapas. Until recently, Chiapas has been relatively free from cartel violence. The criminal organizations have figured out that they can infiltrate municipal-level politics, run local candidates tolerating their operations, and heavily fund those campaigns (or intimidate or kill the other candidates), and gain control on the ground. The...

Duration:00:58:51

Mother Earth Scorching and Parched: the Dixie Fire, Drought, & Indigenous Fire Management Practices

8/19/2021
News headlines from Indigenous countries and an in-depth interview about the Dixie Fire, surrounding fires, the drought, historical trauma, and environmental grief are impacting California Indigenous peoples in northern California. We also discuss how traditional Indigenous fire management practices are a viable means for creating culturally sustainable spaces for future generations, plus more including commentary on the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 6th Assessment...

Duration:00:58:22

Part 2 of Red Nation Rising: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation

7/30/2021
Red Nation Rising is the first book ever to investigate and explain the violent dynamics of bordertowns. Bordertowns are white-dominated towns and cities that operate according to the same political and spatial logics as all other American towns and cities. The difference is that these settlements get their name from their location at the borders of current-day reservation boundaries, which separate the territory of sovereign Native nations from lands claimed by the United States. Despite...

Duration:00:58:02

Part 1 of Red Nation Rising: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation

7/23/2021
Today we interview two contributing authors of Red Nation Rising, the first book ever to investigate and explain the violent dynamics of bordertowns. Bordertowns are white-dominated towns and cities that operate according to the same political and spatial logics as all other American towns and cities. The difference is that these settlements get their name from their location at the borders of current-day reservation boundaries, which separate the territory of sovereign Native nations from...

Duration:00:58:02

Sacred Stage: Talks with Native Playwrights and Artists

7/15/2021
News Headlines from Indigenous countries and premiering: “Sacred Stage: Talks with Native Playwrights and Artists” – an in-depth series of interviews with Indigenous activist, artist, actors/actresses, playwrights and more about their legacy work and how their activism intersects with Indigeneity and the contribution across and within Indigenous and non-Indigenous arts. Guests: Albert “Abby” Ybarra (Yaqui Nation), Project Indigenous member, Environmental Education Specialist, actor,...

Duration:00:58:24

For the Future: The Children and Youth at Standing Rock

7/8/2021
Indigenous peoples have experienced tremendous amounts of trauma since the colonization of North America by the United States and earlier colonial forces. Historical trauma spans generations and has created widespread adverse effects such as substance abuse, breakdown of traditional values, depression, internalized oppression, high suicide rates, and post-traumatic stress, and other various forms of genocides. The Standing Rock Sioux Nation (North and South Dakota), its citizens, and...

Duration:00:58:43

Protecting Mauna Kea Update and Music

7/6/2021
Laulani Teale (Hawaiian Nation) is a musician, artist, cultural practitioner, public health practitioner, web/social media developer, and coordinator for the Ho’opae Pono Peace Project, plus more. Teale join us for this exclusive one-hour interview regarding protecting Mauna Kea, an Indigenous Hawaiian sacred site, from the $1.4 Billion Thirty Meter Telescope Project. Our guest addresses the November 8th, 2019, the University of Hawaii action assuming title over the Mauna Kea lands and the...

Duration:00:59:13

Protecting Cultural, Public Art and Chiapas/Jalisco Protracted Indigenous Land Thefts and more

7/6/2021
Part 1: The City of Santa Barbara, CA plans to completely renovate the Ortega Park in what is called the Ortega Park Restoration project. The “Project,” however, in its present composite will result in the desecration and permanent loss of culturally significant public murals as well culturally significant spaces. Guest: Mark Moses Alvarado, founder of the One Community Bridge Project, a culturally specific non-profit organization, joins us to discuss the work he and the One Community Bridge...

Duration:00:58:56

Pagans in the Promise Land: Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery

5/13/2021
Pagans in the Promised Land provides a startling challenge to U.S. federal Indian law and policy. Using history and cognitive theory, Steven Newcomb demonstrates how U.S. government officials have used religious concepts of Christendom, often unconsciously, to justify the taking of Native American lands and to deny the original independence of Indian nations. He demonstrates that the landmark case Johnson v. M'Intosh is premised in part on the Old Testament narrative of the "chosen people"...

Duration:00:58:39