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At the forefront of growth & development in Asia and the Pacific The Asian Development Bank Institute (adbi.org), Tokyo, is the think tank of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Manila. It is the top regional studies center and the second-ranked government-affiliated think tank in the world. ADBI helps policy makers in developing Asia through research that focuses on medium- to long-term development, and through training that helps reduce poverty.

At the forefront of growth & development in Asia and the Pacific The Asian Development Bank Institute (adbi.org), Tokyo, is the think tank of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Manila. It is the top regional studies center and the second-ranked government-affiliated think tank in the world. ADBI helps policy makers in developing Asia through research that focuses on medium- to long-term development, and through training that helps reduce poverty.
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Location:

Tokyo, Japan

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Podcasts

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At the forefront of growth & development in Asia and the Pacific The Asian Development Bank Institute (adbi.org), Tokyo, is the think tank of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Manila. It is the top regional studies center and the second-ranked government-affiliated think tank in the world. ADBI helps policy makers in developing Asia through research that focuses on medium- to long-term development, and through training that helps reduce poverty.

Language:

English

Contact:

+81 3 35935500


Episodes

Indonesia rice subsidy program improves children’s health

4/19/2018
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Hundreds of thousands of children in Indonesia are growing taller and heavier thanks to the government’s rice subsidy program, which ensures better nutrition despite flaws in the scheme. The government started RASKIN—rice for the poor—in 1998 to help poor and near-poor families cope with high food prices in the wake of the Asian financial crisis. Under the program, currently the largest in-kind subsidy scheme in Indonesia, eligible households across the country receive subsidized rice. Rice...

Duration:00:05:57

Green bonds offer a sustainable alternative for Asian development funding

4/11/2018
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Green bonds, which first appeared in 2007, finance projects that deliver environmental or climate benefits such as climate change mitigation and adaptation investments. The global green bond market is rapidly growing, from $3 billion in 2012 to more than $100 billion in 2017. The Nordic region, particularly Sweden, Norway, and Finland, has pioneered the issuance of green bonds and used specific mechanisms to access debt markets to issue green bonds. These bonds could be used by developing...

Duration:00:05:32

Japanese investors are looking overseas for returns, but avoiding developing Asia

4/4/2018
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Negative interest rates in Japan are leading banks, pension funds, and other investors to look overseas for better returns, but they are mostly ignoring developing Asia, and with rates rising in the US and Europe, that is unlikely to change. Alicia Garcia-Herrero, a prominent economist who has worked at the International Monetary Fund and is now chief economist for Asia-Pacific at the French investment bank Natixis, told the annual conference of the Asian Development Bank Institute that...

Duration:00:05:28

Low rates are hurting developing countries, says Bank of Thailand head

3/28/2018
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Ultra-low or negative interest rates in Japan, the United States, and Europe placed a difficult burden on other central banks and may threaten their independence in the future. Veerathai Santiprabhob, governor of the Bank of Thailand, told the annual conference of the Asia Development Bank Institute that, with interest rates low, central banks have taken to using macroprudential tools. They are tinkering with regulations to affect the actions of markets, investors and consumers, and...

Duration:00:05:21

Central banks are losing power to influence markets as interest rates hit zero

3/28/2018
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Central banks are running out of wiggle room, having lowered interest rates, in some cases to zero or negative, and are losing influence over markets becoming accustomed to a low-rate regime. “Forward guidance” is losing traction. Narayana Kocherlakota, former president of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank, says central banks can try to guide public perception by hinting at their intentions, a practice known as forward guidance in banking circles, and he used to think that once interest...

Duration:00:05:08

The global agenda is evolving, and big players need to change the rules

3/22/2018
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Global governance has undergone significant change since the late 1990s, with the number of global players in health, trade, and development finance rapidly increasing, mobilizing more funds for health and development in developing countries, and spurring global trade. This trend has challenged the three most prominent intergovernmental bodies in these areas—the World Health Organization, the World Trade Organization, and the World Bank. They now need to adapt to a new world order where...

Duration:00:09:46

A crisis is coming in trade and water, part 2

3/14/2018
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Water may be saved through trade provided it moves from countries that use water wisely to those lacking water, as a coming water crisis—driven by climate change, neglect of infrastructure, and misguided policies—threatens global economic growth in countries struggling to develop, and in developed countries. Savings don’t refer to the volume of virtual water of the imported product, but to the volume of water the importers would have required to produce the same quantity of product....

Duration:00:19:49

China’s “shadow banking” after the 2007 global crisis yields unexpected results

3/7/2018
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China’s 2009 economic stimulus program after the global financial crisis led to the growth of shadow banking as local governments scrambled to pay off their obligations under the program. Regulators loosened borrowing rules to avoid a debt crunch, posing risks to the financial system, but in doing so accelerated China’s financial liberalization. Asian Development Bank Institute research details the unintended effects of the four-trillion-yuan stimulus plan launched to insulate China’s...

Duration:00:04:37

A crisis is coming in trade and water, part 1

3/7/2018
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A coming water crisis, driven by climate change, neglect of infrastructure, and misguided policies, is threatening global economic growth in countries struggling to develop, and in developed countries, too. The water crisis is partly due to climate change and the increasing unpredictability of weather, but a lot has to do with the behavior of global trade, trade policies, and institutions that believe water is inexhaustible. It is not. By 2050, global demand for water will have risen by...

Duration:00:12:20

Developing countries need to fix domestic problems to best benefit from globalization

2/28/2018
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Developing countries can benefit from globalization if they fix potential problems at home before opening their economies. Failing to do so can multiply local problems as money streams across borders, suggests ADBI research. For a number of reasons, developing countries might end up worse off if they allow their currencies to float freely and remove controls on money flowing in and out of their country before putting in place strong financial foundations. Economists generally agree that...

Duration:00:03:29

Who would have thought that punctuation could influence borrowing and lending?

2/28/2018
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Peer-to-peer or P2P lending is a way of financing debt online so that people can borrow and lend money without going through a financial institution, like a bank. P2P, also known as social lending or crowd lending, has no need for a middleman and has emerged as an alternative to traditional lending institutions around the world. An Asian Development Bank Institute study using data from Renrendai, one of the largest P2P lending platforms in the People’s Republic of China, found something...

Duration:00:08:14

Lessons from Korea, food insecurity, US trade imbalance, inequality in China, urbanization in India

2/22/2018
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Analysts and economists explain: What emerging economies can learn from South Korea, and how it weathered the Asian financial crisis and came out of it even stronger. Read the transcript: http://bit.ly/2G4YerO How corruption and weak national institutions can undermine food security in countries big and small, regardless of their natural resources. Will the world’s two most populous countries—China and India—be able to feed their people when food consumption is expected to go up by 50% in...

Duration:00:29:55

Better sanitation systems lead to economic growth

2/14/2018
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Providing total and improved sanitation services is a challenge across Asia, as population growth—up 5.7% on average in the past two decades—overwhelms existing infrastructure and outpaces planning. In Central Asia, South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia, 1.7 billion people do not have access to safe sanitation, 780 million still practice open defecation, and 80% of waste water is dumped without proper treatment. The region needs to invest more than $71 billion to provide sanitation...

Duration:00:07:25

SMEs in Asia need easier access to credit

2/11/2018
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Small and medium-sized enterprises are the backbone of Asia’s economies. The Asian Development Bank’s most recent SME survey covered 20 countries in Central, East, South, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific and showed that SMEs accounted for an average of 96% of all enterprises and 62% of the national labor force. SMEs contributed an average of 42% of the gross domestic product or manufacturing value added in these countries, and continued to influence trade. The latest data show that SMEs in...

Duration:00:05:58

Community sanitation can be cheaply improved with money-making technology

2/1/2018
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Basic household sanitation has long been outside the reach of cost-effective comprehensive solutions, especially in communities dependent on septic rather than sewage systems. But this is changing. Groups as varied as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and a coalition of private-sector water technology interests are attacking the problems of fecal sludge management, or FSM, particularly in underserved communities. Thanks to innovative products and platforms and the collaboration of the...

Duration:00:08:03

Women business owners surf the Internet to access credit

1/25/2018
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Women who own small businesses are increasingly turning to digital platforms to source capital for growth as they battle discrimination from formal channels. Small and medium-sized enterprises consistently cite access to credit as the biggest constraint on growth and trade, and a 2016 survey commissioned by the Asian Development Bank confirmed that export firms headed by women reported greater difficulties getting finance than other trading firms. Globally, 10.1% of all formal-sector firms...

Duration:00:05:09

Burgeoning migrant labor is changing economic structures worldwide

1/25/2018
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Recent demographic and societal changes in both developing and developed countries have affected the employment of migrant workers in economies worldwide, and few sectors illustrate the international impact of these changes more than domestic work and home-based care. An increase in women’s employment, rapid population aging, increasing life expectancy, and lower fertility rates have strained traditional care arrangements in the developed and developing world. But tight fiscal policies...

Duration:00:07:10

Emerging economies can learn a lot from how Korea faced down financial crises

1/17/2018
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Emerging economies can learn a lot from how the Republic of Korea faced down the financial crises of 1997 and 2008, and emerged from hard economic slowdown stronger than ever. Painful macroeconomic and financial reforms plugged structural weaknesses and restored investor confidence, and have put Korea in a better position to weather similar shocks, offering lessons for emerging Asian economies. Read the working paper...

Duration:00:08:44

Inequality will worsen as people in the PRC get older

1/17/2018
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An already widening gap between rich and poor in the People’s Republic of China is likely to worsen due to its rapidly aging population. Increasing life expectancy and the effect of a decades-long family planning policy that limited the number of children people could have is felt throughout the economy. At the end of 2011, the number of people over 60 years old in the PRC reached 185 million or 14 percent of the population. By 2030, the PRC is expected to become the world’s most aged...

Duration:00:05:19

Corruption is starving the poor in developing economies

1/10/2018
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Robust institutions and low levels of corruption are more important to reducing hunger than population size or the state of a country’s natural resources. Food security—the ability of a country to feed its people—will become even more important in coming years as Asia’s population rises and resources grow scarcer. A study of 10 countries in Asia and the Middle East found that food security grows alongside the development of political democracy, economic growth, strong judicial systems, and...

Duration:00:04:39

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