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The Number in the News

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One number. One story. Every day. From the number of hours an American athlete spent swimming across the English Channel (54) to the number of Michelin stars a French chef lost for using cheddar cheese (1), we’ll tell you a number you won’t forget. Hear the day’s shareable story via The Number in the News, our smart speaker series. Produced from The World’s newsroom in Boston.

One number. One story. Every day. From the number of hours an American athlete spent swimming across the English Channel (54) to the number of Michelin stars a French chef lost for using cheddar cheese (1), we’ll tell you a number you won’t forget. Hear the day’s shareable story via The Number in the News, our smart speaker series. Produced from The World’s newsroom in Boston.
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United States

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Podcasts

Description:

One number. One story. Every day. From the number of hours an American athlete spent swimming across the English Channel (54) to the number of Michelin stars a French chef lost for using cheddar cheese (1), we’ll tell you a number you won’t forget. Hear the day’s shareable story via The Number in the News, our smart speaker series. Produced from The World’s newsroom in Boston.

Twitter:

@pritheworld

Language:

English


Episodes

2030: Using storytelling to combat climate change

12/9/2019
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Per Grankvist is the chief storyteller at Viable Cities, a program working to make Swedish cities carbon-neutral. He talks about why he thinks storytelling can be a powerful tool to change behavior.

Duration:00:02:13

10: Tax-exempt atheists

12/8/2019
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An atheist church in Canada has been denied tax-exempt status after a court ruled that they did not fit the definition of a religion.

Duration:00:01:20

18: Farewell punctuation -- and all things civilized

12/7/2019
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The Apostrophe Protection Society has grudgingly accepted that English language is changing and the organization is closing down after 18 years.

Duration:00:01:57

90: When France is on strike, bring out the bikes

12/6/2019
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In France Thursday, 90% of all the trains were shut down due to a nationwide transportation workers strike. So, people turned to bikes. "Paris à vélo, c'est sympa” shop owner Mohamed Salhi sees a spike in bike rentals whenever Paris goes on strike. He's anticipating to see more people renting out bikes from his shop to bypass the recent transportation strike in the coming days.

Duration:00:01:56

18,000: Is Dogor a wolf or a dog?

12/5/2019
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The 18,000-year-old specimen was found preserved in permafrost in Russia last summer, but DNA sequencing still hasn't been able to determine if the animal is a dog or a wolf. Dave Stanton, research fellow at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm, tells the details.

Duration:00:02:10

12: Baby Shark’s next video will be in Navajo

12/4/2019
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The Navajo Nation Museum is partnering with South Korean entertainment company Pinkfong to release a video of the viral hit in the Navajo language.

Duration:00:01:59

6: Researchers go to extreme depths to bring fish back to Great Barrier Reef

12/3/2019
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Coral reefs are noisy places. At least, they are when they're healthy. But because of climate change and pollution, these ecosystems are dying. And in the process, they're getting quieter and quieter. Now, researchers are trying to broadcast the sounds of healthy reefs underwater to lure fish back to degraded ones and, hopefully, rebuild them. Marine biologist Steve Simpson at the University of Exeter talks about the research.

Duration:00:02:12

59.1: US fertility rates hit a record low in 2018

12/2/2019
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The fertility rate in the US has been declining for four years now. William Frey, a senior demographer at the Brookings Institution, tells us why it’s low and how we compare to other countries.

Duration:00:02:13

28: Who let the cats out?

12/1/2019
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In light of the growing scientific evidence on cats’ wildlife impacts, legal experts at Tilburg University in the Netherlands analyzed the nature conservation legislation of the European Union. Tilburg University Professor Arie Trouwborst says EU member states must protect birds by ensuring all cats stay inside.

Duration:00:02:15

400: Sustainability activists urge customers to shop responsibly

11/30/2019
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Enjoy Black Friday while you can, it you're in France that is. The French parliament adopted an amendment in committee this week that would ban ads around this massive day-after-Thanksgiving shopping spree.The amendment is part of the country's anti-waste law. It criticizes Black Friday for its "disastrous environmental record." Anne-Christine Carpentier is with ENVIE, one of the groups behind the anti-Black Friday initiative "Green Friday" in France and Belgium.

Duration:00:02:19

7: K-Pop stars are not exempt from military service

11/29/2019
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K-pop stars, including members of the wildly popular BTS boy band, will not be exempt from serving in South Korea's military. That word came down from the country's Ministry of Defense earlier this month.

Duration:00:01:55

1,000: Tractors, farmers protest in Paris

11/28/2019
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Around one thousand tractors blocked Paris Wednesday. French farmers are protesting President Emmanuel Macron's agricultural policies that remove the use of weed killing pesticides such as glyphosate. Farmers are calling this "agri-bashing," or criticism of agriculture over issues ranging from pesticide use to animal welfare.

Duration:00:01:53

3: Michelin Guide excludes world’s “most popular” sushi restaurants

11/27/2019
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Tokyo restaurants Sukiyabashi Jiro and Sushi Saito were each given three stars in the 2019 Michelin Guide. But in 2020, they’re not even included in the book. Restaurant critic Andy Hayler tells host Marco Werman how private membership restaurants are more common in Japan.

Duration:00:01:56

1.2 billion: Largest art heist since World War II

11/26/2019
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Treasures worth up to 1.2 billion dollars were stolen from the Dresden Museum in Germany Monday. Thieves allegedly started a fire at Grüne Gewölbe (or Green Vault), which led to a breakdown of power and failure of security alarms. Hundreds of artifacts were stolen. Police are calling the break-in the largest art heist in postwar history.

Duration:00:01:45

0: Elderly students enroll in class to save South Korean elementary school

11/25/2019
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South Korea has one of the lowest birth rates in the world. One elementary received 0 new students last year. So they came up with a plan to fill the seats: local elders.

Duration:00:01:39

2: The Earth is singing

11/24/2019
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The European Space Agency has released two recordings of a solar storm colliding with Earth’s magnetic field. And it's bizarre.

Duration:00:01:18

12: Kids given chickens in Indonesia

11/23/2019
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A new initiative in one Indonesian city is trying to get kids off their cell phones - by having them take care of baby chicks.

Duration:00:01:23

1: City in India turns pink for cricket match

11/22/2019
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For centuries, cricket was played in daylight only. But in the past few years, more and some programs have played under stadium lights, with a highly visible pink ball. Today, India's national team plays a historic first pink ball match.

Duration:00:01:28

25,000: Is Helsinki the next start-up capital of the world?

11/21/2019
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Finland regularly is named the happiest country on earth. Might be hard to believe with its grey and cold weather. But this week, Helsinki is selling its reputation for work-life balance and quality of life, and trying to become a start-up capital. It's hosting Slush, a tech conference of 25,000 people.

Duration:00:02:08

22: Love around the world

11/20/2019
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When Fleur Pierets and Julian Boom got married in 2017, same-sex marriage was legal in only 22 countries. They set out to get married in all 22. Sadly, Boom died from brain cancer seven weeks after their fourth wedding in France. In a new children's book, “Love Around the World,” Pierets finishes her journey with her wife.

Duration:00:01:53