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The Current

CBC

CBC Radio's The Current is a meeting place of perspectives with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.

CBC Radio's The Current is a meeting place of perspectives with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.

Location:

Toronto, Ontario

Description:

CBC Radio's The Current is a meeting place of perspectives with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.

Language:

English

Contact:

The Current CBC Radio P.O. Box 500 Station A Toronto, ON Canada, M5W 1E6 (877) 287-7366


Episodes

Political fallout of long-term care reports; Ricky L. Jones on America’s problem with white supremacy; Director Steve James on City So Real; How a choir helping dementia patients is overcoming pandemic restrictions

5/29/2020
What are the political repercussions of the military’s damning reports on long-term care homes? We ask our national affairs panel: CBC senior reporter on Parliament Hill Salimah Shivji, Queen's Park bureau chief for the Toronto Star Robert Benzie, and the Montreal Gazette’s Aaron Derfel. Then, the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man in police custody in Minneapolis, has sparked days of protests in the U.S. We talk to Dr. Ricky L Jones about why America needs to have a frank...

Duration:01:15:47

Canada and China’s complicated relationship; David Frum on Trump’s re-election bid; Calgary teens set up joke hotline for seniors; Should for-profit model of long-term care be replaced?

5/28/2020
What does the Meng Wanzhou decision mean for relations with China, and the two Canadians, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, currently being held there? We talk to Rob Malley, who worked with Michael Kovrig, and ex-CSIS director Richard Fadden. Then, is U.S. President Donald Trump’s re-election bid in trouble? David Frum thinks it might be. He explains why, and weighs in on the president’s week of spreading conspiracy theories about his political opponents. Plus, heard the one about the...

Duration:01:15:45

Disturbing report on long-term care home conditions; Concerns over rushing COVID-19 vaccine; Calls for an inquiry into Nova Scotia mass shooting

5/27/2020
Soldiers deployed to shore up staffing at Ontario long-term care homes have made shocking reports about the conditions they saw in five facilities, including cockroaches, reused syringes, and residents left in soiled diapers. After years of warning signs, is this finally the moment for change? Then, with the accelerated search for a COVID-19 vaccine, some experts warn corners are being cut. We talk to William Haseltine and Françoise Baylis about the concerns. Plus, Premier of Nova Scotia...

Duration:01:15:49

Introducing Season 3 of Other People’s Problems

5/26/2020
On Season 3 of Other People’s Problems, host Hillary McBride takes you where microphones rarely go, into her therapy office where her clients hurt, heal, and ultimately thrive. This is what people sound like when they talk with someone they trust about difficult childhoods, ongoing mental health struggles, and the sudden changes we’re all facing right now living through a pandemic. Here’s the first bonus episode of Season 3 of the CBC podcast, Other People’s Problems. More episodes are...

Duration:00:27:27

How provinces differ on COVID-19 testing; Rural internet access; André Picard on public gatherings; Frustration over refunds for cancelled flights

5/26/2020
As Ontario revamps its COVID-19 testing plans, we discuss where provinces are going right — or wrong — and what they can learn from each other. Then, it's a very different lockdown if you don’t have a robust internet connection, as many rural Canadians don’t. We hear from people struggling to get online, as well as an advocate for greater access, and ask Rural Economic Development Minister Maryam Monsef about the country’s digital divide. Plus, The Globe and Mail’s health columnist André...

Duration:01:15:31

WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agency’s pandemic response, Reopening Italy, Kids write about lockdown, and end of life planning spurred by COVID-19

5/25/2020
As COVID-19 spread around the world, so did questions about whether the World Health Organization could have done more to contain it, as well as accusations from U.S. President Donald Trump that the organization was under undue influence from China. Guest host Rosemary Barton puts those questions to Peter A. Singer, special adviser to the director general of the WHO. Then, Italy eased lockdown almost three weeks ago, and a declining death toll suggests social distancing, mask wearing and...

Duration:01:15:48

WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agency’s pandemic response

5/25/2020
As COVID-19 spread around the world, so did questions about whether the World Health Organization could have done more to contain it, as well as accusations from U.S. President Donald Trump that the organization was under undue influence from China. Guest host Rosemary Barton puts those questions to Peter A. Singer, special adviser to the director general of the WHO.

Duration:00:20:56

Limited childcare risks a ‘she-cession’; Calls to decentralize meat processing after COVID-19; Saskatchewan Roughriders superfan; Zoo animals wondering where all the noisy humans went

5/22/2020
The economy is slowly reopening, but many childcare options aren’t — forcing some working moms to choose between work and taking care of the kids. If that choice falls on working moms, it’s bad news for the economy and could mean a “she-cession,” says economist Armine Yalnizyan. Then, meat processing plants have become COVID-19 epicentres, exposing the weaknesses in that part of the food chain. We discuss calls to revamp and address the problems around how meat is produced, and solutions...

Duration:01:12:53

Dr. Bonnie Henry on COVID-19’s second wave; Path to a vaccine; Calling incel violence terrorism; Hawksley Workman wants to write a song about your pet

5/21/2020
B.C.'s provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, talks to Matt Galloway about the likelihood of a second wave of COVID-19, and how lessons learned so far will help Canadians to be ready. Then, we talk to a panel of experts about the progress being made in the search for a vaccine, and whether the public should temper expectations. Plus, police say the killing of a woman at a Toronto massage parlour in February was an act of terrorism, carried out by a 17-year-old who identified as an...

Duration:01:15:41

B.C.'s top doctor Bonnie Henry says 2nd wave of COVID-19 inevitable, but current lessons will guide response

5/21/2020
B.C.'s provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, talks to Matt Galloway about the likelihood of a second wave of COVID-19, and how lessons learned so far will help Canadians to be ready.

Duration:00:21:27

Pandemic pushing restaurants out of business; National affairs panel on border restrictions; How can schools reopen safely?; Dr. Catherine Hankins on AIDS research and COVID-19

5/20/2020
Federico’s Supper Club has been an institution in Vancouver for more than 20 years, but is among a number of Canadian restaurants that recently closed their doors forever. We discuss the challenges facing your favourite restaurants in the pandemic, and beyond. Then, our national affairs panel discusses Ottawa's decision to extend the Canada-U.S. border closure amid COVID-19. We hear from Toronto Star columnist Susan Delacourt, The Globe and Mail’s political reporter Justine Hunter, and...

Duration:01:12:22

Reopening Canada-U.S. border; International travel during pandemic; Health writer André Picard; Remembering Capt. Jenn Casey; Dr. David Fajgenbaum on Castleman disease and COVID-19

5/19/2020
Keep it open, and risk the spread of infection. Keep it closed, and risk further effects on the economy. When is the right time to reopen the Canada-U.S. border? Former acting U.S. Secretary of Labor Seth Harris and former Minister of Foreign Affairs John Manley join Matt Galloway to discuss. Then, what will international travel look like in the months — or years — before we have a COVID-19 vaccine? Photojournalist Laurel Chor recently travelled to Hong Kong, where arrivals are tested and...

Duration:01:16:04

How can Canada curb a second wave of COVID-19?; Gardening in the pandemic; Canadian sailor Alan Mulholland starts long journey home; Vinyl Cafe: Odd Jobs

5/18/2020
What are the prospects of a second wave in Canada? We start today looking to Germany and South Korea, where efforts to reopen are underway, and ask what Canada can learn from those countries. Then, whether you have a backyard, a community plot or a tiny balcony — you can get a little green in your life. We talk to garden lovers across the country about growing from the ground up, and its meditative benefits, during the pandemic. Plus, Canadian sailor Alan Mulholland has been stuck in...

Duration:01:14:39

Documentary: The Sugar Bush

5/15/2020
The pandemic has upended the plans, and even traditions, of so many people in this Country. On a reserve just outside Thunder Bay, freelance journalist Jolene Banning has spent the spring trying to carry on with a practice her ancestors began well over a century ago: tapping the sugar maples.

Duration:00:11:52

May 15, Part 2: Mother-daughter TikTok team; Tapping maple syrup in The Sugarbush; Choirs finding ways to sing together while apart; Obamagate; Man makes hundreds of pies in lockdown for his community

5/15/2020
With parents and kids in lockdown, dance challenges on TikTok have become a family affair. Associate professor Shauna Pomerantz is studying creativity on the social media platform, with some help from her daughter/co-researcher, 11-year-old Miriam. They tell us about doing mom-daughter dances in lockdown — for science! Then, on a reserve just outside Thunder Bay, freelance journalist Jolene Banning has been determined to tap maple syrup, a tradition her ancestors began many years ago. She...

Duration:01:22:13

May 15, Part 1: Provinces beginning to re-open; Three of Canada’s brightest on who we’ll be after the pandemic; Stuart McLean’s Vinyl Cafe: No Tax on Truffles

5/15/2020
We talk to reporters in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario to hear about plans to re-open the provinces, and how COVID-19 has impacted their communities. Then, we ask three of Canada’s finest how they feel about the way the country has responded to COVID-19, and what we might be like after the pandemic passes. Matt Galloway is joined by Giller Prize-winner Madeleine Thien, Olympian Clara Hughes and entrepreneur and philanthropist Mohamad Fakih. Plus, we pay a visit to the Vinyl Cafe with...

Duration:01:10:58

May 14, Part 2: The 10-4 model to getting us back to work; Former Democratic primary candidate Andrew Yang on universal basic income; What can Churchill teach us about crisis leadership?

5/14/2020
10 days working from home, four days back in the office — that’s the two-week model being suggested to get the economy back on track. We speak with economics professor Eran Yashiv, from the team who designed the model, and associate professor of biology Erin Bromage about how to protect ourselves when it’s time to step back into our workplaces. Then, former U.S. Democratic primary candidate Andrew Yang made universal basic income the centre of his platform. He joins us to explain why the...

Duration:01:24:05

May 14, Part 1: First registered nurse in Canada dies from COVID-19; Video games are helping people pass time in lockdown; Redesigning public washrooms for a post-pandemic world

5/14/2020
On Monday, Brian Beattie became the first registered nurse in Canada to die from COVID-19. We hear from nurses about their fears and the moral choices they face as they head to work, particularly as the pandemic conversation shifts to reopening. Then, are you one of millions of people with an island on Animal Crossing? We get the lowdown on the lockdown sensation, and discuss whether the big business of video games means it’s time we see them as more than just a distraction. Plus, do public...

Duration:01:15:38

May 13, Part 2: One family's struggle with schizophrenia; Turning to board games to keep occupied and connected; Chinese-Canadians facing racism

5/13/2020
Of the Galvin family’s 12 children, 6 were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Their struggle, and the hunt for a genetic explanation, is the subject of the new book Hidden Valley Road. We talk to author Bob Kolker and Lindsay Rausch, the youngest sibling. Then, with time on our hands during COVID-19, people are turning to board games to keep occupied and connected. Scott Nicholson discusses the role these games play in our culture. Plus, we hear from Chinese-Canadians facing not only the...

Duration:01:23:25

May 13, Part 1: The financial impact of COVID-19, and the dos and don’ts of reopening the economy

5/13/2020
We hear from Canadians caught up in the economic free fall caused by COVID-19, including a Halifax shop owner in crisis, and an out-of-work personal trainer supporting six kids. Then, Professor of Strategic Management Anita McGahan on the dos and don’ts of reopening the economy, and our national affairs panellists — economics columnist Heather Scoffield, national reporter Mia Rabson, and energy and business reporter Emma Graney — discuss joblessness, 'bailouts', and deficits arising from...

Duration:01:15:25