Something Wild-logo

Something Wild

New Hampshire PR

Something Wild explores the features of our local landscapes, from birds to trees to stone walls, and explains some of the behavior and science behind what we see and hear in our backyards.

Something Wild explores the features of our local landscapes, from birds to trees to stone walls, and explains some of the behavior and science behind what we see and hear in our backyards.
More Information

Location:

Concord, NH

Description:

Something Wild explores the features of our local landscapes, from birds to trees to stone walls, and explains some of the behavior and science behind what we see and hear in our backyards.

Language:

English


Episodes

Something Wild: Do Mosquitos Like You Better?

4/20/2018
More
We often think of the “food chain” in the natural world in linear terms: this eats that, which in turn, is eaten by the other. But today’s subject proves that chain is a little more like a web. The species we’re talking about today feeds on the most dangerous game, the apex of apex predators…us. And the speicies that prey on us? Mosquitos, of course! We recently spoke with Sarah MacGregor, an entomologist and founder of Dragon Mosquito Control, help us learn more about them. We often think...

Duration:00:19:31

Something Wild: NH's Other Foliage Season is Now!

4/13/2018
More
New Hampshire is experiencing one of those few rare and special weeks right now. About 48 weeks of the year, the New Hampshire landscape is pretty homogenous; from a distance our deciduous trees can all look the same: either a blanket of green leaves, or nothing but sticks. But during a few brief weeks in the fall and in the spring – trees show their true colors. New Englanders take pride in our brilliant fall foliage season, but our ephemeral spring foliage season often passes without...

Duration:00:06:08

Something Wild: It's All in the Breeding

4/6/2018
More
A common theme on Something Wild is breeding. (Which is why we always sip our tea with our pinkies extended.) Seriously, though, we talk about the how, when and where because there are a lot of different reproductive strategies that have evolved in nature. Today we take a closer look at two such strategies through the lens of "how often": semelparity and iteroparity.

Duration:00:05:45

Something Wild: Why Are Peepers So Loud?

3/30/2018
More
It’s an unmistakable sound. One that elicits memories, sights and scents of events long ago. It recalls the joy of youth, the possibility of a spring evening. But it can also incite insomnia and the blind rage that accompanies it. Psuedacris crucifer is better known as the spring peeper, and for most people it is a more welcome harbinger. These remarkable frogs spend the winter under leaf litter in a state if suspended animation. Once overnight temperatures are regularly in the forties,...

Duration:00:05:14

Something Wild: Thrushes, A Sure Sign of Spring!

3/23/2018
More
Unfortunately, passing the Equinox, doesn't flip a switch on the weather. While we may be ready for spring temperatures and mild breezes, this week's winds and cold are a reminder that winter will not "go quietly into that good night." While it may not feel like spring, take solace from the fact that heading back to New Hampshire from the tropics, right now, are some of the most melodious songsters that we have: the woodland thrushes. Turdidae is the Latin classification for the Thrush...

Duration:00:05:39

Something Wild: What Does the Vernal Equinox Do?

3/21/2018
More
March 20th marks the Vernal Equinox. It's one of two points on our calendar when day and night are of equal length. More or less. It may be more of a convenient handle we put on an arbitrary point on our annual revolution around the sun, but it is significant in that it marks the point in the year where we start seeing more daylight than darkness. So w ith the days growing longer, this is a great time to talk about photoperiod . Photoperiod is the amount of time in a twenty-four hour...

Duration:00:03:50

Something Wild: 20 Years and Counting!

3/9/2018
More
Twenty years ago this week, New Hampshire Audubon, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and NHPR took our first tentative steps on a journey that would take listeners on weekly outdoor adventures all over the state. Something Wild’s very first episode featured host, Rosemary Conroy, then with SPNHF, encouraging us to go outside and look and listen for the early signs of spring. In the intervening decades, we’ve covered a lot of ground; whether it was Rosemary walking...

Duration:00:05:29

Something Wild: Habitat Hotspots

3/2/2018
More
As the snow starts to melt you might notice a stark contrast in the landscape. Maybe you were driving down the highway and noticed one shoulder was covered with snow while the other side was bare with a faint tinge of spring green shoots. The cause? Slope and aspect. Slope refers to the steepness of the land and aspect refers to the direction the land is facing. Slope and aspect determine how much sunlight a given piece of land receives. The landscape isn't equally endowed and that's most...

Duration:00:04:21

Something Wild: Why Coyotes Seem to be Everywhere

2/23/2018
More
Chris Schadler is a wild canid biologist, and for about 25 years, her specialty has been the coyote. The first confirmed case of coyotes in New Hampshire was an individual found in a trap in Holderness in the mid 1940s. But they have likely been here longer, because as Schadler points out, they didn’t parachute into Holderness, they will have migrated south from Canada.

Duration:00:14:16

Something Wild: Falling in Love with Nature ... and Others

2/16/2018
More
Love stories abound this time of year, so what better time to revisit Something Wild’s First Bitten series where we explore the story of what made biologists fall in love with biology? This story is about a boy and a girl, and the great outdoors. Julie Brown loves birds. She loves them so much, she made a living out of them. As the monitoring site coordinator for the Hawk Migration Association of North America , she counts birds, she tracks population and migration trends, she even plans...

Duration:00:07:11

Something Wild: NH Fisher Numbers Are Down, But Why?

2/9/2018
More
Fisher populations are down, there’s consensus among wildlife biologists at least about that. But why that is happening is open to debate, as is what to do about it. Something Wild sat down with a couple of wildlife biologists recently who disagree; Meade Cadot , former Executive Director of the Harris Center for Conservation Education, and Patrick Tate, leader of the state’s fur-bearer project for NH Fish and Game. We started with a quick refresher on the biology of the species we’re...

Duration:00:06:52

Something Wild: Teachers Spread the Nature Bug

2/2/2018
More
No one knows better than teachers how quickly a bug, once introduced, can take hold. We’re not just talking about head colds and stomach viruses. Today on Something Wild we’re taking a look at how biologists are first bitten. Not surprisingly, many of the biologists we’ve spoken to over the years were inspired to join the ranks at a young age by a teacher. Susi von Oettingen is an endangered species biologist with U.S. Fish and Wildlife here in New Hampshire. For her it was her advanced...

Duration:00:07:21

Something Wild: Sand Dunes are More than Just Piles of Sand

1/26/2018
More
This week we have another edition of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods, where we take a closer look at one of the more than 200 natural communities you can find within the confines of our state border. Communities like the Alpine Zone or Red oak, Black birch Wooded Talus , but those are pretty rare. Today we’re heading to one of the most ubiquitous ecological landscapes in the world. The Coastal Sand Dune is found in nearly all latitudes from just outside the polar regions to the equator....

Duration:00:06:50

Something Wild: How Trees Survive NH Winters

1/19/2018
More
Here at Something Wild, we don’t have a problem with winter. Aside from the snow and the cold and the freezing rain… okay, maybe we have a couple issues. But we have sweaters and hot cocoa and Netflix. Trees, however, do not. As the snow piles up, you may see trees bent over with their crowns nearly touching the ground, leafless and haggard. They can’t escape or hide from the cold, so how do trees survive? Just like any living thing, trees have adapted over time to deal with the range of...

Duration:00:04:39

Something Wild: Life Abounds in Alpine Zones

1/5/2018
More
So the thing about “nature shows” - even this one - is that we tend to talk about plant and animal species in pretty independent terms. "The red-tailed hawk eats this, sounds like that, does this in the winter…" But as we’ve tried to explain over the years (here at Something Wild) the hawk is just one resident in complex ecological puzzle; she interacts with other animals and plants in the neighborhood. In this installment of NH’s Wild Neighborhoods we're going to take a look at another of...

Duration:00:05:15

Something Wild: Why We Deck Our Halls

12/29/2017
More
O Tannenbaum is a song often heard this time of year, and it signals a deeper arborphilia within our culture. Modern Yuletide rituals abound with trees. But why is it that each December we festoon our houses with evergreen foliage or close facsimiles? As it turns out, bringing Nature indoors is a common holiday theme especially around the winter solstice - the longest night of the year. During this dark time, we humans have always pined especially for daylight, and the life and color it...

Duration:00:05:21

Something Wild: 12 Birds of Christmas...NH-Style!

12/22/2017
More
Tis the season for Christmas carols but at Something Wild one in particular captures our attention: The Twelve Days of Christmas. There are a lot of birds featured in the song but, like so many of our carols, the lyrics are from old Europe and don’t really speak to life in 21 st century New England. So we thought maybe it’s time for an update… a rewrite… a New Hampshire Christmas carol. We’ll skip over days twelve through eight – those all have to do with crafts people and artisans – and...

Duration:00:04:51

Something Wild: Where Have All the Birds Gone?

12/15/2017
More
As we hunker down for the winter weather, we’re frequently too preoccupied with what is in our front yards that we tend not to notice what isn’t there. The snow and ice have muscled out the grass, and the chilly sounds of the north wind have blown away the dawn chorus that woke us this summer. And short of finding a postcard in your mailbox from a warm exotic location, signed by your friendly neighborhood phoebe , you probably haven’t thought much about the birds that flitted through your...

Duration:00:04:27

Something Wild: Oxbows Not Just for Oxen

12/8/2017
More
So the thing about “nature shows” - even this one - is that we tend to talk about plant and animal species in pretty independent terms. "The red-tailed hawk eats this, sounds like that, does this in the winter…" But as we’ve tried to explain over the years (here at Something Wild) the hawk is just one resident in complex ecological puzzle; she interacts with other animals and plants in the neighborhood. So today we're looking not at a single species, but rather at a single neighborhood and...

Duration:00:06:07

Something Wild: Activity on NH's Ice-Scape

12/1/2017
More
Water is what has allowed life to generate and regenerate on this tiny blue marble of ours. Most of us would shrivel up and blow away without a water supply. And yet every year at this time water becomes scarce, surface water anyway. So the question is what happens when that water freezes. Consider for a moment how profound it is when you wake up that morning in December and the temperature is below freezing. It’s a bit of a touchstone, because, barring a a thaw, you know the temperature’s...

Duration:00:05:23

Try Premium for 30 days

Live games for all NFL, MLB, NBA, & NHL teams
Commercial-Free Music
No Display Ads