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Stereo Chemistry

Science Podcasts

Stereo Chemistry is C&EN's podcast that delivers chemistry's frontiers to your ears. C&EN is the news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Stereo Chemistry is C&EN's podcast that delivers chemistry's frontiers to your ears. C&EN is the news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Location:

Washington, DC

Description:

Stereo Chemistry is C&EN's podcast that delivers chemistry's frontiers to your ears. C&EN is the news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Twitter:

@cenmag

Language:

English

Contact:

2025974815


Episodes

Ep. 34: Chemists confront the helium shortage

10/21/2020
Helium shortage 3.0 is winding down. But 2021 is likely to bring more changes to the global market for this critical, non-renewable gas. And even if there isn’t another crunch, scientists who use helium are tired of unstable supply of a material they need to keep their instruments running. In this episode of Stereo Chemistry, we’ll look at what’s behind the wobbly helium market and what scientists and instrument makers are doing to lift the heavy burden of helium use. A script for this...

Duration:00:26:00

Ep. 33: On being #BlackInChem

9/23/2020
In August 2020, Black chemists and allies took to Twitter to celebrate the inaugural #BlackInChem week. The social media campaign highlighted the diversity and accomplishments of Black chemists at all stages of their career and also created space for candid discussions about the discrimination these scientists face in chemistry. In the latest episode of Stereo Chemistry, host Kerri Jansen and reporter Ariana Remmel hear from Black chemists from a variety of disciplines across academia and...

Duration:00:24:54

Ep. 32: Should organic chemistry’s name reactions go the way of mouth pipetting?

8/19/2020
Scientists have been naming ideas, theorems, discoveries, and so on after other scientists for a very long time (Newton’s laws of motion, anyone?). Chemists are no different. They’ve been naming reactions after each other since about the early to mid 1800s. Nowadays, organic chemists in particular use them as a kind of shorthand. However, because the majority of name reactions honor white men, some organic chemists wonder if using these names is exclusionary. In the latest episode of Stereo...

Duration:00:26:55

Ep. 31: A world without Rosalind Franklin

7/22/2020
Rosalind Franklin and her lab assistant famously imaged the structure of DNA using X-ray crystallography, an achievement that directly facilitated James Watson and Francis Crick’s discovery of the double helix. For what would be Rosalind’s 100th birthday, the Stereo Chemistry team consults scientists and historians to envision the many ways the world might be different without the now-famous Photograph 51. Listen to the Distillations episode “Science on TV” at bit.ly/30yjZuU. A script of...

Duration:00:23:21

Bonus episode: Talking TSCA—is the chemical law living up to expectations?

6/17/2020
This month marks 4 years since the Toxic Substances Control Act, or TSCA, was revised to boost confidence in chemical safety in the US by strengthening regulations. The updated law gave the Environmental Protection Agency sweeping new authority to ensure that the tens of thousands of chemicals in everyday products do not pose unreasonable risks to human health and the environment. In this bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry, host Kerri Jansen and C&EN senior reporter Britt Erickson examine how...

Duration:00:18:14

Ep. 30: The chemical culprit in 2019's mysterious vaping illnesses—what we still don't know

5/27/2020
Months before the novel coronavirus took hold of the globe in late 2019, clusters of patients began appearing in emergency rooms throughout the US with a mysterious lung disease. Investigators quickly linked the illnesses not to a pathogen, but to patients’ use of vaping products. By examining the chemicals in these products, they eventually found a chief suspect: vitamin E acetate. The compound was being used as a cutting agent in some counterfeit or illicit cannabis-based vaping products....

Duration:00:29:39

Ep. 29: This virus is here now, it's going to stay with us

5/1/2020
As COVID-19 continues to spread, so does the effort to treat and vaccinate against the novel coronavirus that causes the disease. Around the world, scientists are working nonstop on the different therapies that they hope will quell the loss of life during this pandemic while, at the same time, setting us up to prevent future outbreaks. What’s not clear is which, if any, of these treatments will work. Much about SARS-CoV-2 remains unknown. In this episode of Stereo Chemistry, we dig into the...

Duration:00:34:59

Bonus episode: That just isn’t how you land on the moon without crashing

4/10/2020
Fifty years ago this week, an explosion on the Apollo 13 moon mission stranded three astronauts hundreds of thousands of miles from home. You probably know that Fred Haise, Jim Lovell, and Jack Swigert made it home safely (water landing shown, with two of the astronauts in white). You may not know the chemist behind the rocket engine that saved them, which began its life as an apparatus for measuring chemical reaction rates. This bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry tells the story of the...

Duration:00:14:06

Ep. 28: So that's why we threw a robot into the back of a truck

3/18/2020
Chemistry is going the way of computing: It’s getting smaller and faster. High-throughput experimentation, or HTE, is part of this push. Borrowing from biologists and biochemists, HTE has brought in microplates and multichannel pipettes to miniaturize reactions, as well as robots to run those reactions rapidly without sacrificing precision. But it’s also been around for decades. So why are so many in the field excited about HTE right now? Stereo Chemistry looks at the technology and culture...

Duration:00:35:17

Bonus episode: We’re watching it very closely

3/10/2020
As the novel coronavirus responsible for causing COVID-19 continues to spread, questions about the virus, the disease, and its impacts on our daily lives mount. To help you stay current with the science, policy, and business implications of this outbreak, C&EN has made all of its coronavirus coverage freely available at cenm.ag/coronavirus. And in the latest bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry, we discuss one of the largest questions on the business front: How is the coronavirus affect-ing the...

Duration:00:14:50

Bonus episode: We saw a lot of that scientific sage savior syndrome

2/20/2020
Stereo Chemistry talked with six chemists who spent a year in Washington on a policy fellowship to find out what they learned and what advice they would give to other scientists who are interested in science policy. Check out Andrea Widener’s AAAS policy fellows story on C&EN at https://cen.acs.org/policy/Lessons-learned-from-a-year-in-Washington/98/i4. And learn more about the AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowship at...

Duration:00:14:23

Ep. 27: The earth is going to be fine; what we’re saving is ourselves

2/10/2020
Climate change is on the public’s mind, thanks in no small part to the efforts of Swedish activist Greta Thunberg and protests and rallies involving young people around the world. In the latest episode of Stereo Chemistry, host Kerri Jansen talks to early-career researchers developing the tools and knowledge we’ll need to thrive in a changing climate. These scientists are part of a generation who will experience the effects of climate change throughout their lifetimes. They share what drew...

Duration:00:26:47

Bonus episode: It's this big, giant brouhaha of pharmaceutical companies

2/3/2020
M&A, the FDA, and an empty elevator. In this bonus episode, C&EN reporters Ryan Cross and Megha Satyanarayana share their takeaways from their time at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare conference a few weeks ago. Read more about JPM 2020 here: https://cen.acs.org/business/investment/JP-Morgan-Healthcare-Conference-slow/98/i3 Image credit: Credit: Megha Satyanarayana/C&EN

Duration:00:10:01

Ep. 26: Evolution is kind of the be all end all in the problem of influenza

1/31/2020
Although the Wuhan coronavirus is currently dominating headlines across the globe, influenza kills hundreds of thousands of people worldwide each year. In the US, millions of people roll up their sleeves annually for a flu shot. But this ritual is confusing for many. Why is it that most vaccines are effective for a lifetime while the flu vaccine is only effective for a year? And why do we sometimes get the flu even when we’ve gotten the vaccine? The answer is evolution: the flu is constantly...

Duration:00:33:03

Bonus episode: All this is happening at Northvolt speed

1/22/2020
Late last year, C&EN contributing editor Mark Peplow toured a new battery company’s R&D facility in Sweden. That company, called Northvolt, aims to produce the world’s greenest lithium-ion batteries, to help meet the growing demand for electric vehicles. Ride along with Mark to learn more about the company, its work, and its goals in the first bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry. Check out Mark's full story for C&EN here: ...

Duration:00:11:07

Ep. 25: It was like, bam, half the ozone layer over Antarctica is gone

12/20/2019
The discovery of the ozone hole in the mid-1980s sent shock waves through the scientific community and society at large. As scientists scrambled to make sense of the unprecedented phenomenon, a clear culprit emerged. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)—once thought of as near-miraculous compounds that revolutionized refrigeration—were suddenly revealed to be one of the biggest environmental dangers known to humankind. What followed was an international push by scientists, media, and policy makers to...

Duration:00:25:44

Ep. 25: It was like, bam, half the ozone layer over Antarctica is gone

12/15/2019
The discovery of the ozone hole in the mid-1980s sent shock waves through the scientific community and society at large. As scientists scrambled to make sense of the unprecedented phenomenon, a clear culprit emerged. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)—once thought of as near-miraculous compounds that revolutionized refrigeration—were suddenly revealed to be one of the biggest environmental dangers known to humankind. What followed was an international push by scientists, media, and policy makers to...

Duration:00:25:44

Ep. 24: Kids are happy to get to ask whatever they want

11/26/2019
For its latest episode, Stereo Chemistry handed its recorders over to kid journalists interviewing grown-up chemists about cutting-edge research. Listen in as the children get answers to questions about DNA, environmental clean-up, and even C-H activation. The kids’ reporting was part of an outreach event called Science Storytellers that took place during the American Chemical Society National Meeting in San Diego in August. Science Storytellers empowers kids to ask questions as they...

Duration:00:23:34

Ep. 23: That’s a hell of a lot of explosive material

10/17/2019
Rocket propellant research had its heyday in the mid-20th century, when the space race and the Cold War meant chemists had plenty of money and long leashes. Few of their most interesting ideas ended up in working rockets, but they charted new areas of chemical space, some of which, like boron chemistry, have proved useful in other fields. Geopolitical shifts, along with a growing emphasis on health, safety, and the environment, dampened propellant chemistry in the last decades of the 1900s....

Duration:00:35:52

Ep. 22: I didn’t know they were going to be worth billions—A conversation with John Goodenough

8/28/2019
Without fail, the name John Goodenough crops up during Nobel Prize season. Many scientists believe he’s deserving of chemistry’s top honor. The University of Texas at Austin materials scientist is credited with developing a material that led to mass commercialization of lithium-ion batteries, the technology that powers our smartphones, laptops, electric vehicles, and other gadgets big and small. Though Goodenough, aged 97, hasn’t yet won a Nobel Prize, he’s not mired down by what could have...

Duration:00:34:56