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The Deep-Sea Podcast

Science Podcasts

A couple of deep-sea scientists talk everything deep sea! Interesting facts, recent news, myth-busting and interviews with the most interesting people we know.

Location:

United Kingdom

Description:

A couple of deep-sea scientists talk everything deep sea! Interesting facts, recent news, myth-busting and interviews with the most interesting people we know.

Language:

English


Episodes
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PRESSURISED: 048 - Deep-sea sharks with Justin Cordova

7/12/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 48. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/048-sharks We’re back on the elasmobranch train with our latest episode all about deep-sea sharks! We speak with Justin Cordova, co-founder and deputy director of The Rogue Shark Lab all about the fascinating world of deep-sea sharks! What makes them different from their shallow-water relatives? Why do their eyes glow green? How exactly do you get into a career in deep-sea shark research? Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! ------------------------------------------------------------------ Support us by becoming a patron and joining our deep-sea community! ------------------------------------------------------------------ NEW MERCH DESIGNS Check out our podcast merch here! Which still includes Alan’s beloved apron. ------------------------------------------------------------------ GET IN TOUCH Email: podcast@armatusoceanic.com Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com ------------------------------------------------------------------ FURTHER RESOURCES People mentioned Justin Cordova - Co-founder of The Rogue Shark Lab Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - PRESSURISED Logo Edited by - Georgia Wells #deepsea #deepocean #shark #podcast #science #marinebiology #alanjamieson #thomaslinley #justincordova #sharkweek #megalodon #goblinshark #interview #scicomm

Duration:00:28:54

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Deep-sea sharks with Justin Cordova

7/5/2024
We’re back on the elasmobranch train with our latest episode all about deep-sea sharks! We speak with Justin Cordova, co-founder and deputy director of The Rogue Shark Lab all about the fascinating world of deep-sea sharks! What makes them different from their shallow-water relatives? Why do their eyes glow green? How exactly do you get into a career in deep-sea shark research? The Professor is trapped in paradise (somewhere in Fiji) whilst he quarantines before his next big offshore expedition. But he’s not alone - alongside his new pal Roger (the guard gecko) he's quarantining with deep-sea celebrity, Jason 'J-Rod' Rodriguez. The famed SuBastian ROV pilot is joining Alan on this next leg of the expedition to the Tonga Trench. Make sure you're following us to hear all of the updates in our next episode! Andrew is back from his travels and was just as excited about our Lake Baikal episode as us! In this month's Coffee with Andrew segment, he talks us through the unbelievable similarities between deep-ocean and the deep-lake fish of Baikal. Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! ------------------------------------------------------------------ Support us by becoming a patron and joining our deep-sea community! We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us: Claudio Zanette | Becca Nicholls | Rebecca Rulnick ------------------------------------------------------------------ NEW MERCH DESIGNS Check out our podcast merch here! Which still includes Alan’s beloved apron. ------------------------------------------------------------------ GET IN TOUCH Email: podcast@armatusoceanic.com Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke Thom - @ThomLinley Georgia - @geeinthesea Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea Thom - @thom.linley Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com ------------------------------------------------------------------ FURTHER RESOURCES NEWS Study shows sexual parasitism helped anglerfish invade the deep sea Biological Sunglasses in a Deep-Sea Squid: Pigment Migration in the Retina of Gonatus onyx The huge new paper on the classification of ray-finned fishes (living and fossil) People mentioned Ryan Howard - AUT Squid Squad PhD Candidate Kat Bolstad - AUT Squid Squad leader AUT Squid Squad Website & Twitter Andrew Stewart - Curator of Fishes at Te Papa Museum, New Zealand Justin Cordova - Co-founder of The Rogue Shark Lab Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - AMNH Edited by - Georgia Wells #deepsea #deepocean #shark #podcast #science #marinebiology #alanjamieson #thomaslinley #justincordova #sharkweek #megalodon #goblinshark #interview #scicomm

Duration:01:02:57

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PRESSURISED: 023 – Keeping deep-sea animals with The Monterey Bay Aquarium

6/28/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 23. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/023-deep-aquaria Can we safely bring deep-sea organisms to the surface and keep them alive? Certain species, such as the giant isopods and giant Japanese spider crabs have been kept in aquaria in the past but the number of animals we can maintain long-term is quite small. The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s new Into the Deep exhibition has succeeded in keeping animals never before put on public display, some are even new to science. Not only that, but they have even had some success in getting them to reproduce! Figuring out what conditions these animals need and observing them over long periods will allow us to learn huge amounts about animals we usually only get a glimpse of. We talk with aquarists Ellen Umeda and Michelle Kaiser and life-support engineer Brian Maurer about the years of work that went into keeping these animals and giving the public a very personal deep-sea experience. Check out our podcast merch! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron. Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Links Into the Deep: Aquarium YouTube Channel Online exhibition Deep-sea adaptation story with video Bioluminescence story with video Animal information story Exhibition development with life support diagram Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - The Deep-Sea Podcast PRESSURISED Logo Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:00:29:56

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PRESSURISED: 047 - The depths of Lake Baikal with Marianne Moore

6/14/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 47. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/047-baikal Located in southern Siberia and covered in thick ice for almost half of the year, the colossal Lake Baikal reaches depths of 1600m making it the oldest, and deepest lake in the world. With hydrothermal vents, methane seeps and vast swathes of endemic species, this ancient lake was too tempting not to talk about. We speak with Professor Marianne Moore, a Limnologist who has been working on the lake for over 2 decades. She guides us through its incredible ecosystems and species such as the world's only freshwater seal, deep water insects and foot-long flatworms! We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us! Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! Check out our podcast merch here! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron and a much anticipated new design... Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke (https://twitter.com/Hadalbloke) Thom - @ThomLinley (https://twitter.com/ThomLinley) Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://twitter.com/geeinthesea) Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea Thom - @thom.linley Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com FURTHER RESOURCES LAKE BAIKAL READING Intro to Lake Baikal and lakes: Mogolov, L.S. 2017. The Soul of Siberia at Risk. Wellesley Magazine. p.16-22. Moore, M.V., S.E. Hampton, L.R. Izmest’eva, E.A. Silow, E.V. Peshkova, and B. Pavlov. 2009. Climate change and the world’s ‘Sacred Sea’ – Lake Baikal, Siberia. BioScience 59:405-417 Thomson, P. 2007. Sacred Sea: A Journey to Lake Baikal, Oxford University Press. 320 p. Vincent, W.F. 2018. Lakes. A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press. 146 p. Vents and seeps: Crane, K., Hecker, B. and Golubev, V., 1991. Hydrothermal vents in Lake Baikal. Nature, 350(6316), pp.281-281. Zemskaya, T.I., Sitnikova, T.Y., Kiyashko, S.I., Kalmychkov, G.V., Pogodaeva, T.V., Mekhanikova, I.V., Naumova, T.V., Shubenkova, O.V., Chernitsina, S.M., Kotsar, O.V. and Chernyaev, E.S., 2012. Faunal communities at sites of gas-and oil- bearing fluids in Lake Baikal. Geo-Marine Letters, 32, pp.437-451. Fish: Sideleva, V.G. 2003. The Endemic Fishes of Lake Baikal. Backhuys Publishers. Sideleva, V.G. 2004. Mysterious Fish of Lake Baikal. Science First Hand 3:N2. (Note: ‘black umber’ and ‘white umber’, mentioned in this article, are two endemic varieties of the Siberian grayling Thymallus arcticus.) Sideleva, V.G., 2016. Communities of the cottoid fish (Cottoidei) in the areas of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps of the abyssal zone of Baikal Lake. Journal of Ichthyology, 56, pp.694-701. Seal: Nomokonova, T., Losey, R.J., Iakunaeva, V.N., Emelianova, I.A., Baginova, E.A. and Pastukhov, M.V., 2013. People and seals at Siberia’s Lake Baikal. Journal of Ethnobiology, 33(2), pp.259-280. Watanabe, Y.Y., Baranov, E.A. and Miyazaki, N., 2020. Ultrahigh foraging rates of Baikal seals make tiny endemic amphipods profitable in Lake Baikal. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 117(49), pp.31242-31248. Environmental threats: Moore, M.V., S.E. Hampton, L.R. Izmest’eva, E.A....

Duration:00:29:25

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The depths of Lake Baikal with Marianne Moore

6/7/2024
Located in southern Siberia and covered in thick ice for almost half of the year, the colossal Lake Baikal reaches depths of 1600m making it the oldest, and deepest lake in the world. With hydrothermal vents, methane seeps and vast swathes of endemic species, this ancient lake was too tempting not to talk about. We speak with Professor Marianne Moore, a Limnologist who has been working on the lake for over 2 decades. She guides us through its incredible ecosystems and species such as the world's only freshwater seal, deep water insects and foot-long flatworms! Plus, we hear about the myths and mysteries of the lake: from scientifically testing whether the mafia can use amphipods to effectively dispose of bodies, to whether there really is 1600 tonnes of gold hiding at the bottom of the lake. The Professor is back on land after a succession of crazy adventures which includes writing a paper on backwards swimming in deep sea fish, finding the worlds deepest nudibranch (possibly) plus discovering his friends live in the most metal place ever. There’s no Coffee with Andrew segment this month as he is taking a well deserved break (and is possibly touring the country looking for the strangest milks he can find), but we do hear from Kakani Kajita about the recent release of FathomVerse - the mobile game helping to contribute to deep sea citizen science. Kakani tells us about how it’s doing in its first month of release, and how it’s already making an impact in training deep sea AI models. We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us: Elinor Wahl | Andrew Stewart | KJ Quintanilla | Thomas Brattheim Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! Check out our podcast merch here! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron and a much anticipated new design... Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke (https://twitter.com/Hadalbloke) Thom - @ThomLinley (https://twitter.com/ThomLinley) Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://twitter.com/geeinthesea) Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea Thom - @thom.linley Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com FURTHER RESOURCES Triton submarines are building a new submarine to visit the Titanic to show that deep sea exploration is safe Robotic Explorers Uncover Unexpected Ancient Origins of Strange Seafloor Formations Deep-sea sponge's 'zero-energy' flow control could inspire new energy efficient designs LAKE BAIKAL READING Intro to Lake Baikal and lakes: Mogolov, L.S. 2017. The Soul of Siberia at Risk. Wellesley Magazine. p.16-22. Moore, M.V., S.E. Hampton, L.R. Izmest’eva, E.A. Silow, E.V. Peshkova, and B. Pavlov. 2009. Climate change and the world’s ‘Sacred Sea’ – Lake Baikal, Siberia. BioScience 59:405-417 Thomson, P. 2007. Sacred Sea: A Journey to Lake Baikal, Oxford University Press. 320 p. Vincent, W.F. 2018. Lakes. A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press. 146 p. Vents and seeps: Crane, K., Hecker, B. and Golubev, V., 1991. Hydrothermal vents in Lake Baikal. Nature, 350(6316), pp.281-281. Zemskaya, T.I., Sitnikova, T.Y., Kiyashko, S.I., Kalmychkov, G.V., Pogodaeva, T.V., Mekhanikova, I.V., Naumova, T.V., Shubenkova, O.V., Chernitsina, S.M., Kotsar, O.V. and Chernyaev, E.S., 2012. Faunal communities at sites of gas-and oil- bearing fluids in Lake Baikal. Geo-Marine Letters, 32,...

Duration:01:08:30

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PRESSURISED: 022 - Live-streaming the deep with Kasey Cantwell

5/24/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 22. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/022-dive-streaming One of the most exciting parts of our job is going to places that no one has ever been before and seeing things that no one has ever seen. It turns out, we were making that far harder than it needs to be, we can do all this from home! Several of the big names in deep-sea exploration live-stream (or dive-stream if we’re being cute). With just a few seconds delay, you can see deep-sea exploration as it happens and may be present for very significant finds. You never know what you’re going to find down there. The big players in this space are the Schmidt Ocean Institute, Nautilus Live from the Ocean Exploration Trust and Ocean Exploration/Okeanos Explorer from NOAA. We are lucky enough to chat with Kasey Cantwell, the Operations Chief of the NOAA Ocean Exploration Expeditions and Exploration Division. We talk about the amazing opportunities this new way of doing science presents. From allowing 300 experts to take part, to swapping out your expert team when you find something unexpected and even the physical and societal barriers that can be removed. But it’s not just about getting science done, it’s about sharing these experiences with everyone. Online communities are forming around these streams and illustrations, poetry and memes are just as valid outputs. Check out our podcast merch! Please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch. We find the idea of real people in the actual world wearing this so surreal! Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We are also on Twitter: @ArmatusO Facebook: ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @armatusoceanic Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Glossary AUV – Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Berth – Beds available onboard a ship basically Manganese nodule – potato shaped balls of metal that form on the seabed, the focus of deep-sea mining ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle Taxonomist – A specialist in categorising a specific group of species. Telepresence – Live-streaming what you’re doing on the internet Links Start dive-streaming yourself! NOAA Ocean Exploration Schmidt Ocean Institute Nautilus Live Become part of the online community! Livestream Oceanographic Discord Look out for expedition names as hashtags on Twitter Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - The Deep-Sea Podcast PRESSURISED Logo

Duration:00:28:31

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PRESSURISED: 046 - Deep sea rays & skates with Will White

5/10/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 46. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/046-rays This month we're talking about the flattest of the elasmobranchs: the bottom-dwelling batoids - the deep sea rays and skates! We’re kicking off our cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) mini-series with the batoids - the rays and skates! Sharks are often associated with the deep sea, but did you know that batoids have been observed as deep as 3000m? We speak with Will White who researches elasmobranchs across the world and who has described 50 species! He talks us through the differences between sharks rays and skates, and how these species utilise the deep sea. We hear about their fascinating (and hugely varied) reproductive strategies like those that are viviparous (will keep the eggs in their uterus) and others that are oviparous (will lay the eggs). We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! Check out our podcast merch here! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron and a much anticipated new design... Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke (https://twitter.com/Hadalbloke) Thom - @ThomLinley (https://twitter.com/ThomLinley) Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://twitter.com/geeinthesea) Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://www.instagram.com/geeinthesea/) Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Links More info on Will and his research Will’s recent article on a new family of deepwater sharks Great eggcase hunt - Sharks Trust Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo Image - The Deep-Sea Podcast PRESSURISED Logo Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:00:29:55

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Deep sea rays & skates with Will White

5/3/2024
This month we're talking about the flattest of the elasmobranchs: the bottom-dwelling batoids - the deep sea rays and skates! We’re kicking off our cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) mini-series with the batoids - the rays and skates! Sharks are often associated with the deep sea, but did you know that batoids have been observed as deep as 3000m? We speak with Will White who researches elasmobranchs across the world and who has described 50 species! He talks us through the differences between sharks rays and skates, and how these species utilise the deep sea. We hear about their fascinating (and hugely varied) reproductive strategies like those that are viviparous (will keep the eggs in their uterus) and others that are oviparous (will lay the eggs). It wouldn’t be a Coffee with Andrew segment without a memorable insight into the world of a fish curator - and this month’s segment is no different! This time, Dr Thom asks Andrew about an unexpected factoid in one of Andrew’s publications: ‘Yolk smells and tastes like sweetened condensed milk’. We find out exactly how Andrew knows this. We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us: Matthew Gerrard | Jeff Day | Colin Platt Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! Check out our podcast merch here! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron and a much anticipated new design... Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke (https://twitter.com/Hadalbloke) Thom - @ThomLinley (https://twitter.com/ThomLinley) Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://twitter.com/geeinthesea) Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://www.instagram.com/geeinthesea/) Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Links Moku Art Studio virtual exhibition Thom appears on Radio New Zealand Blog-style articles of our interviews Here's a nice paper with a few observations of elasmobranch food falls New parasite just dropped! New shark family! Bioluminescence 300 millions years older than previously thought Fathomverse is now live! More info on Will and his research Will’s recent article on a new family of deepwater sharks Great eggcase hunt - Sharks Trust Andrew’s book mentioned in Coffee with Andrew Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo Image - Matthias Stehmann et al. (2021) Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:01:07:21

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PRESSURISED: 021 - Deep sea images and AI with Kakani Katija

4/26/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 21. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/021-ai We have often talked about how difficult it is the get data from the deep sea… but would you believe that the bottleneck to our understanding of the deep ocean, at least as far as visual data, is processing those images? Turning a picture of the deep sea into a list of species, habitat type, sediment type etc. is a time-consuming process that requires a wide range of skilled people. Due to time/funding constrains a lot of valuable information is lost. A team looking at a specific question will have lots of information in their data that other teams could use. A picture is worth a thousand data points. We chat with Dr Kakani Katija, the co-founder of FathomNet, an open-source repository for labelled deep-sea imaging data. The platform is still in beta but it is hoped that it will allow scientists to easily and usefully share their amassed data in a single and easily searchable place. But what about that processing bottleneck? The tech-savvy listener may have noticed that a massive collection of labelled image data is exactly the sort of thing you need to train a Machine Learning or Deep Learning algorithm. Can we automate a lot of the time-consuming image processing and let the experts focus on the new and unusual stuff? It’s at this cutting edge that things get exciting and we may be at the cusp of a marine science renaissance. We also launch our podcast merch! Please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch. We find the idea of real people in the actual world wearing this so surreal! Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We are also on Twitter: @ArmatusO Facebook: ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @armatusoceanic Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Glossary Artificial Intelligence (AI) – A science dedicated to making machines think in an intelligent way, mirroring a biological brain. Data pipeline – A path that raw data follows to become useful information. Deep Learning – a more complex subset of ML that mirrors the way a brain works Machine Learning (ML) – computers learning to perform a task without being explicitly programmed to do so ML/AI model or algorithm – A model that has been trained on real data and can now process new data itself. Online Repository – A database stored online so that people can access it from anywhere Open Source – A publicly accessible design that people can freely repurpose and adapt. Visual data – photos or video as a form of scientific data Links Our new merch! Kakani’s Twitter FathomNet goodies The FathomNet website – have an explore of the labelled deep-sea critter data FathomNet GitHub – take a peek under the hood or even get involved FathomNet articles with tutorials/explanations Helpful video tutorials Paper NOAA Science Seminar, 8 March 2022 1200-1300 PST (UTC-8) Register now! FathomNet Workshop, 31 March & 1 April 2022 0800-1100 PST (UTC-8) Register now! Internet of Elephants (gamifying processing camera-trap data) Beyond Blue (game) Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - PRESSURISED logo

Duration:00:28:07

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PRESSURISED: 045 - Hagfish with Doug Fudge

4/12/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 45. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/045-hagfish What has no jaw, inverted horizontal teeth, saggy skin and can produce litres of suffocating slime when touched? it’s the episode you’ve been waiting for… The hagfish special is here. Dr Thom is back from his stint offshore, and The Professor pretty much now lives in a submarine, but that hasn’t stopped them from finally reuniting to make this special episode all about hagfish. We’ve talked about them a lot on the show, and decided it’s time to pass them the mic. So expect lots of slimy stories, toothy tales and a whole load of hagfish trivia you never knew you needed. There’s lots of updates after so many recent deep sea expeditions, with Thom’s latest cruise discovering many new species and Alan sharing live updates from the sub. Keep up with their latest goings-on via twitter! We speak to the king of the hagfish, Professor Doug Fudge, who has been studying these critters and their (in)famous slime for decades. We ask all the interesting questions like: how do they make so much slime, do they have any predators and why do they look like that? We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! Check out our podcast merch here! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron and a much anticipated new design... Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke (https://twitter.com/Hadalbloke) Thom - @ThomLinley (https://twitter.com/ThomLinley) Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://twitter.com/geeinthesea) Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://www.instagram.com/geeinthesea/) Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com People mentioned: The famous hagfish vs shark slime video Moku Art Studio virtual exhibition People mentioned More info on Professor Douglas Fudge Fudge’s research lab Follow Doug on twitter More info about Andrew Stewart Dr Vincent Zintzen Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - PRESSURISED Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:00:29:18

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Hagfish with Doug Fudge

4/5/2024
What has no jaw, inverted horizontal teeth, saggy skin and can produce litres of suffocating slime when touched? it’s the episode you’ve been waiting for… The hagfish special is here. Dr Thom is back from his stint offshore, and The Professor pretty much now lives in a submarine, but that hasn’t stopped them from finally reuniting to make this special episode all about hagfish. We’ve talked about them a lot on the show, and decided it’s time to pass them the mic. So expect lots of slimy stories, toothy tales and a whole load of hagfish trivia you never knew you needed. There’s lots of updates after so many recent deep sea expeditions, with Thom’s latest cruise discovering many new species and Alan sharing live updates from the sub. Keep up with their latest goings-on via twitter! We speak to the king of the hagfish, Professor Doug Fudge, who has been studying these critters and their (in)famous slime for decades. We ask all the interesting questions like: how do they make so much slime, do they have any predators and why do they look like that? Plus, we have another instalment of the fan-favourite: Coffee with Andrew. This time, Andrew talks us through his love of hagfish, how to successfully remove their slime, and why brushing their teeth is super important! Thanks again for tuning in - we’ll be back soon with some cartilaginous-based episodes! -------------------------------------- We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us: Shaun Thompson | Maarten van der Meer Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! DID YOU KNOW WE SELL MERCH? Check it out here!! And please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch! Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own comments on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! Follow us on social media! Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook:DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media: Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke, Thom - @ThomLinley, Georgia - @geeinthesea Instagram: Thom - @Thom.Linley, Georgia - @geeinthesea Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Further resources The famous hagfish vs shark slime video Moku Art Studio virtual exhibition Nazca ridge SOI cruise discovers 100 new species NewYonder (Sign up here) or explore their catalogue Don’t forget to use our discount code DEEPSEA20 and get 20% off your first three months of a UK monthly subscription People mentioned More info on Professor Douglas Fudge Fudge’s research lab Follow Doug on twitter Follow Jeff on twitter More info about Andrew Stewart Dr Vincent Zintzen Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - AMNH Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:01:11:16

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PRESSURISED: 020 - Love in the deep sea with Craig Young

3/22/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 20. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/020-love It’s February, the month of love and there’s love in the deep ocean too. We talk reproductive strategies in the deep sea with Professor Craig Young, Dr Autun Purser and Dr Mike Vecchione. How do you find a mate in the sparsely populated deep ocean? How can egg and sperm meet when you are fixed growing on a rock? How can your babies disperse and find a suitable habitat, especially if you live in a rare habitat like a hydrothermal vent? We find the solutions to all these problems and more. Feel free to get in touch with questions or you own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We are also on Twitter: @ArmatusO Facebook: ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @armatusoceanic Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Glossary Abyssal plain – the wide-open spaces of the deep sea, most of the planet Filter feeder – animal that feeds by filtering the water e.g., sponge Gametes – the reproductive cells, eggs and sperm Gonad – the organ that produces the gametes Hadal trench – the deep-sea trenches more than 6 km deep Hermaphrodite – both male and female simultaneously Sessile – animals that cannot move (opposite of mobile) Links Massive icefish breeding ground paper Ecosystems of the World – Craig has a great chapter on reproduction in this book Paper - Estimating dispersal distance in the deep sea: challenges and applications to marine reserves Paper - Reproduction, Larval Biology, and Recruitment of the Deep-Sea Benthos Paper - Hadal snailfish reproduction Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - PRESSURISED logo

Duration:00:30:24

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PRESSURISED: 044 - Alan takes over

3/8/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 44. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/044-alan-takes-over It finally happened… we brought you an episode which was recorded almost completely offshore. With Dr Thom in the Bounty Trough and the Professor somewhere in the Pacific, this episode is quite the wild card. Whilst Thom has been busy crocheting fishing nets (that’s science folks), Alan was left to take the reins and he decided to go a little off-piste. We bring it back to the good old days with one of Alan’s (in)famous rants. This one is titled: When does the sea become the deep sea, and why it needs to be changed. Expect to hear about the history of why we decided what makes the deep-sea ‘deep’, and why it might not make sense anymore in our modern world. We’d love to hear your thoughts on this and whether you agree with Alan. Finally, we check in with a key individual in the online deep-sea community space: Jeff Day. Jeff’s been on our radar for years with his immense knowledge of deep-sea cephalopods and we thought we’d finally hand him the mic. He talks to us all about his love of deep sea creatures and how he contributes to the field in unconventional ways. We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! Check out our podcast merch here! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron and a much anticipated new design... Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke (https://twitter.com/Hadalbloke) Thom - @ThomLinley (https://twitter.com/ThomLinley) Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://twitter.com/geeinthesea) Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://www.instagram.com/geeinthesea/) Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com People mentioned: Follow Jeff on twitter Dr Derek Hennen (millipede and centipede taxonomist) The Magnapinna Archive (Youtube and Twitter) Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - PRESSURISED Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:00:28:56

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Alan takes over

3/1/2024
Are you looking for a podcast episode that contains the return of the blobfish, golden crochet hooks and rare deep-sea squid? Well, look no further than this episode of The Deep-Sea Podcast! It finally happened… we brought you an episode which was recorded almost completely offshore. With Dr Thom in the Bounty Trough and the Professor somewhere in the Pacific, this episode is quite the wild card. Whilst Thom has been busy crocheting fishing nets (that’s science folks), Alan was left to take the reins and he decided to go a little off-piste. We bring it back to the good old days with one of Alan’s (in)famous rants. This one is titled: When does the sea become the deep sea, and why it needs to be changed. Expect to hear about the history of why we decided what makes the deep-sea ‘deep’, and why it might not make sense anymore in our modern world. We’d love to hear your thoughts on this and whether you agree with Alan. Dr Thom does make an appearance in this episode, giving us a run-down of how the research cruise is going (SPOILER: The blobfish is back). Plus, we hear about the original blobfish and how exactly it came to be an internet sensation, from the man who was there: new fan favourite, Andrew Stewart. Finally, we check in with a key individual in the online deep-sea community space: Jeff Day. Jeff’s been on our radar for years with his immense knowledge of deep-sea cephalopods and we thought we’d finally hand him the mic. He talks to us all about his love of deep sea creatures and how he contributes to the field in unconventional ways. We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us: Jacqueline | Tyler Medeiros | Kevin Gilley Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! Check out our podcast merch here! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron and a much anticipated new design... Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke (https://twitter.com/Hadalbloke) Thom - @ThomLinley (https://twitter.com/ThomLinley) Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://twitter.com/geeinthesea) Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea (https://www.instagram.com/geeinthesea/) Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Links Moku Art Studio virtual exhibition Parasite director Bong Joon-ho is set to begin filming deep sea species for his new film this year A new species of deep-sea mud dragon has been described by Martin Vinther Sørensen New fishery for lanternfish https://phys.org/news/2024-02-deep-sea-fishery-horizon.html Info on the original Mr Blobby People mentioned: Follow Jeff on twitter More info about Andrew Stewart Dr Vincent Zintzen (Filmed the blobfish in situ) Dr Derek Hennen (millipede and centipede taxonomist) The Magnapinna Archive (Youtube and Twitter) Bruce Robison Daniel Moore - Ocean census Kat Bolstead (ALCES Squid Squad) Kerryn Parkinson (Australian Museum) Joe Nelson (Expert in blobfishes) Soundtrack of the month: Tangaroa - Alien Weaponry Spotify & Youtube Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - Thomas Linley Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:00:52:49

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PRESSURISED: 019 - Deep sea squid with Mike Vecchione

2/23/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 19. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/019-squid As promised in the Christmas special, we call the ‘squid-phone’ – a special line used by scientists globally when they seem something strange and squiddy. On the other end of that line is Mike Vecchione, the expert on cephalopods. We talk giant and colossal squid (to audible groans from Mike); the bigfin squid (Magnapinna), most famous for being the squid with the long trailing arms that’s often used as an example of terrifying deep-sea creatures, but also a species, genus and Family that Mike described and would love more sightings of. We are also on: Twitter: @DeepSeaPod Facebook: @DeepSeaPodcast Instagram: @deepsea_podcast Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Edited by - Georgia Wells #deepsea #marinebiologist #marinebiology #podcast #marianatrench #science #magnapinna #colossalsquid #giantsquid #gigantism #scicomm #deepseafish #deepseacreatures

Duration:00:25:27

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PRESSURISED: 043 - Offshore Stories: Tales of typhoons and science in submarines

2/9/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 43. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/043-offshore-stories From being repeatedly thrown off your bed in a storm, to seeing blue whales out of your porthole, working at sea doesn't leave you short of stories. And with Dr Thom and the Professor both heading offshore soon, they thought what better time to share some of their sea stories. From tips on how to hold your pee for 12+ hours, to tales of typhoons, this episode is jam-packed with real-life tales from decades of working offshore. We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us: Antony Raymont | Courtney Johnston | Davina Gifford | Sophie Schindler Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! DID YOU KNOW WE SELL MERCH? Check it out here!! And please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch! Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own comments on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! Follow us on social media! Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook:DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media: Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke, Thom - @ThomLinley, Georgia - @geeinthesea Instagram: Thom - @Thom.Linley, Georgia - @geeinthesea Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - The Deep-Sea Podcast: PRESSURISED Logo Edited by - Georgia Wells

Duration:00:27:04

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Offshore stories: Tales of typhoons and science in submarines

2/2/2024
From being repeatedly thrown off your bed in a storm, to seeing blue whales out of your porthole, working at sea doesn't leave you short of stories. And with Dr Thom and the Professor both heading offshore soon, they thought what better time to share some of their sea stories. From tips on how to hold your pee for 12+ hours, to tales of typhoons, this episode is jam-packed with real-life tales from decades of working offshore. In deep sea news: Norway has decided to go ahead with deep sea mining, cold coral reefs are being discovered, and hoards of marine fungi have been found in the twilight zone! But more importantly than all of that: the Professor was awarded an OBE! His sword and noble steed are currently in the post (first class), and we’re hoping they reach him in Perth from the Palace. We’ve also started a new segment with long-time friend of the show, Andrew Stewart who has an interesting hobby of manufacturing cod-liver shark-liver oil. Expect more unexpected stories from Andrew in future episodes! Finally, we want to say thanks again for your support! We have lots of exciting upcoming episodes all about the (in)famous hagfish, deep sea sharks and our favourite: chimera. Stay tuned! We’re really trying to make this project self-sustaining so we have started looking for ways to support the podcast. Here’s a link to our page on how to support us, from the free options to becoming a patron of the show. We want to say a huge thank you to those patrons who have already pledged to support us: Antony Raymont | Courtney Johnston | Davina Gifford | Sophie Schindler Thanks again for tuning in, we’ll deep-see you next time! DID YOU KNOW WE SELL MERCH? Check it out here!! And please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch! Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own comments on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! Follow us on social media! Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook:DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media: Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke, Thom - @ThomLinley, Georgia - @geeinthesea Instagram: Thom - @Thom.Linley, Georgia - @geeinthesea Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Further resources Just the Zoo of us Podcast with Dr Thom DOSI newsletter to keep up with everything deep sea News Megalodon tooth found in nodule field Norway becomes the first country in the world to approve commercial-scale deep-sea mining. Largest study of ocean dna finds a huge abundance of fungi in the mesopelagic zone. Scientific paper & news article Hagfish genome sequenced Largest cold-water coral reef to date has been found Guest info Andrew’s bio Andrew’s blog on the Gut Stuffer 2000 Soundtrack of the month A Song About an Anglerfish - Hank Green Glossary Cold-water corals - Deep-water corals (or cold-water corals) grow in water temperatures of 4 - 12°C. Unlike shallow water corals, they do not depend on a symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) for growth and survival, resulting in slower growth. Deep-sea mining - The process of extracting manganese nodules from the deep ocean floor. Hagfish - An eel-shaped jawless fish. Hagfish are marine predators and scavengers. Hull - A hull is the watertight body of a ship. Megalodon - An extinct species of giant shark that lived approximately 23 to 3.6 million years ago. Metagenomes - Genetic material taken from the environment rather than from one individual. OBE - (Order of the British Empire) is a British award rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the civil service. Squalene - Squalene is a natural oil that comes from shark liver. Submarine - A submarine (or sub) is a watercraft capable of independent operation underwater. Thrusters - Manoeuvering thrusters (bow...

Duration:00:53:36

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PRESSURISED: 018 - Sound in the deep ocean with David Barclay

1/26/2024
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 18. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/018-sound We think of the deep sea as an eerily quiet and spooky place but that isn’t completely true, animal communication, seismic activity, human noise and even the sound of rain and waves from 10 km above. We chat with undersea audio expert Dr David Barclay about the fascinating audio properties of the deep ocean. As we are talking audio data on an audio medium, lets have some fun with a game of ‘what can we grenad-hear’ where Thom tries to guess the deep-sea sound. Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com Support the show here: https://patreon.com/deepseapodcast We are also on: Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke Thom - @ThomLinley Georgia - @geeinthesea Instagram: Thom - @ThomLinley Georgia - @geeinthesea Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Glossary CTD: Conductivity, temperature and depth sensor Gametes: sex or germ cells. Eggs and sperm Grenadier: another name for a rattail fish Hydrothermal vent: seawater heated by the earth flows out of the seabed Lander: Free-falling or pop-up vehicle. Sinks from the surface and comes up again by dropping ballast Refraction: the change in direction of a wave passing from one medium to another Sound channel: Also called the SOFAR channel, a horizontal layer of water in the ocean at which depth the speed of sound is at its minimum Links David’s other podcast: Sciographie David’s research website Implosion in the Challenger Deep paper Underwater noise during COVID-19: Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - The Deep-Sea Podcast PRESSURISED Logo

Duration:00:26:16

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The Deco-Stop: 003 - Eco-anxiety

1/5/2024
THE DECO-STOP: A DEEPER LOOK INTO THE HUMANS BEHIND DEEP SEA SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. This is our third Deco-Stop episode, and this time we’re focusing on eco-anxiety. We are currently in the midst of an ecological crisis, but eco-anxiety is something of a mental health crisis in response. Many of us who work in this space (and many of us who don’t) are feeling these emotions, including plenty of our listeners who have got in touch to share their experiences. As such, we’ve wanted to make this episode for some time, but during it’s production, it became a far bigger subject than we were ready for. One thing that did become apparent, is that this is a dangerous subject and it is something that can do real harm. In this episode, we share with you some stories of how different individuals have influenced their lives in a direct response to eco-anxiety. Plus, we hear from the perspective of a psychotherapist who specialises in the field of climate & eco-crisis psychology. However, this is not a list of answers, and the priority is your health and safety and as the listener. We hope that this episode offers an insight towards such a big and difficult topic. Whilst it won’t leave you with a complete set of instructions on how to fix the world, we hope you find it comforting that there is a huge number of people who are feeling the same as you are. It’s a lrngthy one, so grab a cup of tea, give your local tree a quick hug, and tune in to this beefy episode of the Deco-Stop. MEET OUR GUESTS CAROLINE HICKMAN Psychotherapist and lecturer at the University of Bath working in the field of climate psychology. Her research focuses on eco-anxiety, distress about the climate and ecological crisis in children and young people. LEARN MORE DAN DE KLERK Co-founder of Nomadic Permaculture, an organisation based in Picton, New Zealand that offers consultancy and courses in how to live a more sustainable lifestyle in harmony with your local community and ecosystem. LEARN MORE BRIAN BERNEMAN Wellness coach and co-founder of Conscious Action, a collective based in Auckland, New Zealand that encourages people to make meaningful and achievable changes in their lives, to help the planet. LEARN MORE DID YOU KNOW WE SELL MERCH? Check it out here!! And please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch! Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own comments on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note! FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA! Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook:DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic Keep up with the team on social media Twitter: Alan - @Hadalbloke, Thom - @ThomLinley, Georgia - @geeinthesea Instagram: Georgia - @geeinthesea LINKS RESOURCES MENTIONED BY DAN Dan’s Nomadic Permaculture course on sustainable food growing Info on the Kaipātiki Project (which Dan also works for) and his Sustainable Life: Design Workshop MENTIONED BY CAROLINE Sally Weintrobe - Psychoanalyst who focuses on climate anxiety and it’s links to neoliberal capitalism and the culture of ‘un-care’ Jay Griffiths - Author who writes about how western children have more mental health issues than children from indigenous cultures Paul Hoggett - Co-founder of the Climate Psychology Alliance and coined the term ‘love miles’ Every other day a climate activist is murdered - news article Climate Psychology Alliance Therapeutic Support Climate Psychology Alliance Climate Cafes CREDITS Theme – Hometime by Harvey Jones Logo image - The Deco-Stop

Duration:01:25:28

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PRESSURISED: 017 - Going to sea with Larkin

12/22/2023
Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 17. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be! Read the show notes and find the full episode here: https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/017-going-to-sea We love going to sea, it is probably the best part of the job. That’s where most of our adventures happen, that’s where most of the exciting discoveries and firsts happen and it’s where we meet some of the most interesting people. We want you to have a great time at sea too and not be put off by a bad first experience. Poor packing or a faux pas could spoil the whole experience and we don’t want that. We put together some advice for your first trip. Forgive us if parts seem patronising, they are all things we have seen spoil someone’s trip and with everything else to worry about, it’s easy to forget the simple stuff. We chat with Larkin, a deck-hand turned youtuber about life at sea and sharing that experience through her videos. What is her average day like at sea and how’s the morning commute when your office is a small response vessel chasing a submarine 10,000 m below you? How can you get a celebratory tattoo offshore from an unqualified scientist? “Don’t worry, he’s a doctor, not that sort of doctor but don’t worry about that!” Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We are also on Twitter: @ArmatusO Facebook: ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @armatusoceanic Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com Glossary AB – Able Bodied seamen or deck hands A-frame – type of lifting equipment, usually at the stern Aft – towards the front of the boat Bow – the front of the boat Bridge – Usually at the top of the boat, where it is steered from Bulkhead – the thick metal internal walls of a boat Cabin – where you sleep offshore Deck – the floors on a boat Fore – towards the front of the boat Head – the toilet Mates – Officers under the captain (1st and 2nd mate) Mess – the dining hall on a boat Port – left side of the boat (regardless of which way you are facing), colour coded red Rigger boots – steel toe capped safety shoes Starboard - right side of the boat (regardless of which way you are facing), colour coded green Zodiac – a small and fast inflatable boat My Salty Sea Life Website Instagram YouTube Facebook Larkin’s ‘a day in the life of a sailor’ video. Great prep for your first time at sea. Larkin’s morning commute (a keen eye may spot Alan pottering about in the background) Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image - The Deep-Sea Podcast PRESSURISED

Duration:00:29:51