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UC Science Today is produced by the University of California and covers the latest and greatest research throughout the system. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

UC Science Today is produced by the University of California and covers the latest and greatest research throughout the system. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.
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United States

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UC Science Today is produced by the University of California and covers the latest and greatest research throughout the system. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Language:

English


Episodes

A better understanding of stem cell research

5/3/2017
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Stem cells studies have been controversial, but once scientists started using adult cells, instead of embryos, their experiments became more acceptable. Neurologist Lauren Weiss of the University of California, San Francisco, says with technological advancements, researchers are now facing new challenges. "A lot of the current public debates are around gene editing technologies, so we are not actively using those in the labs now. But I think that’s where I think some of the concern has...

Duration:00:01:07

Why some younger women are more likely to develop breast cancer

5/2/2017
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Younger women are more likely to develop breast cancer if their breasts are dense. This means they have more supportive tissue, rather than fatty tissue, around the ducts. That’s according to a new study by Karla Kerlikowske of the University of California, San Francisco. “The risk of breast cancer increases with age, but if you look among younger women who do develop breast cancer, more of them will have dense breasts. “ Cancer rarely develops in fat, so that’s why when it comes to breast...

Duration:00:00:59

The weekly roundup - May 5th

5/2/2017
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This week on Science Today, we learned that the treatment of concussions has not been very well-defined, so radiologist Pratik Mukherjee at UC San Francisco is calling for more studies and a better understanding from doctors and researchers. "Some people recommend cognitive rest, where you stay away from doing anything intense; physical or mental activities; stay away from bright lights and loud noises for several days. Some of the more recent studies are saying, well, maybe that’s not...

Duration:00:01:30

A call for better concussion studies

5/1/2017
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The treatment of concussions has not been well-defined, and it’s sometimes controversial. So radiologist Pratik Mukherjee of the University of California, San Francisco is calling for more studies and a better understanding from doctors and researchers. “Some people recommend cognitive rest, where you stay away from doing any intense physical or mental activities, stay away from bright lights and loud noises for several days. Some of the more resent studies are saying, well, maybe this is...

Duration:00:01:02

How advances in MRI technology are benefiting health

4/27/2017
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Advanced image-capturing technology for MRI scanners paired with powerful computers, allow researchers to quickly detect and analyze the smallest changes in brain function after a concussion. Radiologist Pratik Mukherjee of the University of California, San Francisco explains how it works. “With the latest technology that we are starting to apply, we can actually get several images of the brain within one second. So we can image the entire brain in less than a second. And we do it...

Duration:00:01:03

Have you ever heard of a mini brain?

4/25/2017
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Want to know how our brain is formed and what causes changes in its structure? You could look at a mini-brain…this is emerging 3D technology created from stem cells. “Mini brains allow you to ask some questions that are more challenging to ask about a single cell essentially in isolation, vs. what happens when cells are moving in a three-dimensional space and interacting with each other in three-dimensions as well.” That’s neurologist Lauren Weiss of the University of California, San...

Duration:00:01:00

The weekly roundup - April 29th

4/25/2017
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This week on Science Today, we learned that a major risk factor for breast cancer is a woman’s breast structure – specifically, what’s called breast density. Karla Kerlikowske of the University of California, San Francisco explains it’s a radiologic term because on a mammogram, doctors look at how much dense tissue someone has versus how much fat tissue. "We found breast density was four times more likely to account for the development of breast cancer than having a first degree relative...

Duration:00:02:04

A new study reveals a major risk factor of breast cancer

4/24/2017
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This is Science Today. Every year, about 250 thousand women in America are diagnosed with breast cancer, making it one of the leading types of cancers nationwide. And now a University of California, San Francisco study reveals a major risk factor of the disease. Study leader Karla Kerlikowske says it’s breast structure, or as researchers says, breast density. “Breast density is a radiologic term. On a mammogram, you look at how much in quotes “dense” tissue someone has vs how much fat."...

Duration:00:01:05

Will precision medicine change the way experimental studies are conducted?

4/18/2017
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Precision medicine should change the way researchers conduct experimental studies. That’s according to pediatric surgeon Hanmin Lee of the University of California, San Francisco. “All the studies that are currently done right now and all the data that is collected is generally on one subset of patients which is generally older white men. But for let’s say young under-represented female minority patients, the implication of this manifestation, this disease, might be far different.“ So, Lee...

Duration:00:00:59

The FDA approves a new drug for Multiple Sclerosis

4/17/2017
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The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug that could halt multiple sclerosis, a devastating disease that affects hundreds of thousands of Americans. Neurologist Bruce Cree of the University of California, San Francisco, was part of the team testing ocrelizumab, which goes by the brand name Ocrevus. Cree explains that it targets B cells in the human body and blocks the inflammation that drives the disease. Most MS therapies in the past targeted T cells, which often had...

Duration:00:00:59

The weekly roundup - April 22nd

4/17/2017
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There was a lot of exciting University of California research news this past week. First the Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug that could halt Multiple Sclerosis. We had previously spoken to neurologist Bruce Cree of the University of California, San Francisco about his work testing the new drug, called ocrelizumab. At the time, Cree explained that it actually targets B-cells in the human body, blocking the inflammation that drives the disease. He explained that most MS...

Duration:00:01:51

A new way to study brain disorders

4/15/2017
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Researchers have found a new way to study brain disorders. Neurologist Lauren Weiss of the University of California, San Francisco is growing brain cells out of simple skin biopsies taken from patients with autism and other developmental problems. “We can grow those cells in a lab and then turn them into stem cells, and ultimately into the cells of the brain. That’s a pretty amazing advance when you think about how challenging it is to study the human brain. Nobody wants to give you too...

Duration:00:01:00

A revolutionary way to look at our DNA

4/11/2017
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A new technique called exome sequencing is a revolutionary way to look at our DNA. This, according to psychiatrist Stephen Sanders of the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine. Basically, it allows researchers to determine the structure of all expressed genes in a genome and recently, it helped UCSF scientists find mutations in a gene that triggers autism. “And that was a gene called SCN2A, which stands for Voltage Gated Sodium Channel 2 Alpha. When we saw that result,...

Duration:00:01:05

Here's one way to improve the quality of the nation's healthcare

4/10/2017
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One way to improve the nation’s healthcare quality is to start effectively analyzing medical data using modern technology in clinics and hospitals. This is something that the industry hasn’t done just yet, according to pediatric surgeon Hanmin Lee of the University of California, San Francisco. “We don’t have one unified electronic medical record system. So it is hard to aggregate big data, but I believe we are on the cusp of that. ” Lee says diagnostic methods should be improved too. “For...

Duration:00:01:06

Concussion rates are a growing problem

4/9/2017
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Globally, head injuries are a growing problem. In the U.S., more than 3 million Americans are admitted to emergency rooms every year after suffering a concussion. “And concussion rates are rising in other countries, too. Especially in developing countries like China and India because they have many more motor vehicles on the roads now. “ That’s radiologist Pratik Mukherjee of the University of California, San Francisco, He says this topic doesn’t get a lot of media attention, unless...

Duration:00:00:59

Giving kids a vaccine in lollipop form?

4/5/2017
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A proof-of-concept study at the University of California, Berkeley has found promise in a pill-sized technology that could lead to painless oral vaccines. Aside from not having to deal with a needle anymore, we asked study leader Dorian Liepmann what are some of the other advantages of a system like this? "Well, the great thing is we can actually do this at home. You could give this to people so they don’t need to go to a pediatrician. One of my co-investigators suggested that we could...

Duration:00:01:01

The weekly roundup - April 7

4/4/2017
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This week on Science Today, we learned how a pediatric surgeon is helping to kick-start innovative projects to bring to clinics in an effort to advance children’s health. Dr. Hanmin Lee of UC San Francisco, says even though technology, biology and medicine go hand-in-hand, advanced devices are not always available to the most vulnerable hospital patients because of insufficient funding. "We organize the engineering of children’s health symposiums to try to bring all the emerging technologies...

Duration:00:01:37

A project aims to bring emerging technologies to benefit children's health

4/2/2017
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Technology, biology and medicine now go hand and hand. But state-of-the-art devices are not always available to the most vulnerable hospital patients, often because of insufficient funding. Pediatric surgeon Hanmin Lee of the University of California, San Francisco helps kick-start innovative projects to bring to clinics. “We organize the engineering children’s heath symposiums to try to bring all the emerging technologies to the benefit of children’s health. ” UCSF is now developing...

Duration:00:01:02

A better view of brain injuries that arise after a concussion

4/2/2017
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Researchers have discovered a new way to spot brain injuries that arise after a concussion. With advanced, functional MRI scanners, doctors can not only make images of what the brain looks like after the injury, but also how it works. “To get a better handle of being able to say what’s going wrong in the brain after the concussions, we are actually looking at brain function and connectivity in the brain, how different brain regions connect with each other and talk to each other.” Pratik...

Duration:00:01:01

A new understanding of the genetic risk factors for autism

4/1/2017
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In the last couple of years, researchers have come a long way in their understanding of the genetic risk factors for autism – from not knowing how to find autism genes to discovering a variety of mutations linked to the disorder. Psychiatrist Stephen Sanders and his colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco recently found a molecule responsible for infantile autism. “The hope is that this gene gives us insight of what autism is at a fundamental new logical level. So key...

Duration:00:01:02