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Latino USA

NPR

Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.

Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.
More Information

Location:

New York, NY

Networks:

NPR

Description:

Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.

Twitter:

@latinousa

Language:

English

Contact:

361 West 125th Street Fourth Floor New York, NY 10027 646-571-1220


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Episodes

Of Bloodlines And Conquistadors

7/19/2019
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"Hispano" is an identity unique to New Mexico and southern Colorado. It defines people who consider themselves to be descendants of the Spanish conquistadors that arrived in the 1500s. Hispanos have lived side by side the Pueblo for centuries—mixing cultures, identities, and even bloodlines. But recently, tensions have risen between the two groups over Santa Fe's annual conquistador pageant, known as La Entrada, which celebrates the arrival of the Spanish. For some, it celebrates heritage....

Duration:00:34:57

Could Synthetic Biology Stop Global Warming?

7/16/2019
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It's a fact: Latinos are concerned about climate change—actually more than non-Latinos. Producer (and guest host) Antonia Cereijido is no exception and her anxiety led her to the work of Héctor García Martín, a scientist at the Joint BioEnergy Institute. Synthetic biology is an emerging field that allows scientists to re-engineer biological systems for new purposes, and one major thing it could lead to is new biofuels which would reduce the release of carbon dioxide—the main cause of global...

Duration:00:17:29

How I Made It: King of The Bongo Makers and Ambar Lucid

7/12/2019
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In this episode, we're sharing two segments from our "How I Made It" series, which dives into the stories behind creative processes. Today, two music stories, separated by two generations. We hear how a mambo-obsessed Jewish kid from the Bronx ended up starting a Latin percussion empire, thanks to the trade embargo with Cuba. And, songwriter Ambar Lucid travels to Mexico to reconnect with her father for the first time since his deportation when she was a young girl.

Duration:00:23:11

Willie Perdomo Comes Home

7/9/2019
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In the early 1990s, Willie Perdomo was a teenager growing up in East Harlem. He saw and experienced firsthand a tumultuous moment in New York City, including the crack epidemic and the consequences of the war on drugs. In his newest book of poetry, "The Crazy Bunch," Perdomo wrangles with that history and the ghosts of that time. Latino USA's Antonia Cereijido takes a walk with Perdomo through his old neighborhood of Harlem to discuss his teenage years and how memories of that time inspired...

Duration:00:18:06

Portrait Of: Luna Lauren Vélez

7/5/2019
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For the past 25 years, Luna Lauren Vélez has been portraying powerful Latinas in front of the camera. From a young Nuyorican mother in the 1994 cult classic "I Like It Like That" to a Cuban police captain in the hit show "Dexter," the actress has been able to show the complexities of identity in her characters. That inspiration didn't come out of nowhere. Vélez is one of eight siblings in her large Puerto Rican family and is continually inspired by the strong women that raised her. Luna...

Duration:00:28:58

Portrait Of: Cypress Hill's Sen Dog

7/2/2019
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Senen Reyes, also known as Sen Dog, is one of the founding members of the pioneering rap group Cypress Hill. Their music differs from other West Coast hip-hop from the 80s and 90s—Cypress Hill was less concerned with gang life and focused more on marijuana activism. But Cypress Hill's legacy extends much further than making weed mainstream—they were the first all-Latino hip-hop group to have platinum and multi-platinum albums. Sen Dog joins us to talk about the legacy of his group Cypress...

Duration:00:25:22

Portrait Of: 80s Ball Subculture In FX's 'Pose'

6/28/2019
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When you think of the 1980's in New York City, you might think of grit and crime – but a vibrant, dazzling underground ball scene? Maybe not. The hit series "Pose" on FX is now telling the stories of that scene – a subculture of LGBTQ people of color creating a safe and joyous space during a time when they were not accepted. "Pose" is making history by featuring the largest cast of transgender actors ever on TV as well as the largest recurring cast of LGBTQ actors for a scripted series....

Duration:00:26:45

Seeking Asylum, Seeking To Stay Together

6/25/2019
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Mauricio Pérez and his boyfriend Jorge Alberto Alfaro González met on Facebook in El Salvador during the summer of 2015. After Mauricio's sister was killed by members of a gang and Jorge's young cousins were killed by a rival group, both of them became targets of repeated attacks and death threats. So by January of 2016, Jorge and Mauricio decided to flee the country. They both applied for asylum in Mexico. But only Jorge's application was approved, forcing them to navigate Mexico's complex...

Duration:00:22:38

Comedian Arturo Castro Finds Humor In This Political Moment

6/21/2019
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Arturo Castro is a Guatemalan actor and writer best known for playing "Jaime" on Comedy Central's "Broad City" and cartel leader David Rodriguez on Netflix's "Narcos." Now, after a decade in the business, Castro is taking the lead and starring in his own sketch show on Comedy Central. "Alternatino with Arturo Castro" is about Castro's identity as an immigrant and navigating life as a Latinx millennial. We sit down with Arturo Castro to talk about how he got his start in comedy and how he...

Duration:00:27:18

City Of Oil

6/19/2019
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Los Angeles, you might be surprised to learn, sits on top of the largest urban oil field in the country and has been the site of oil extraction for almost 150 years. Today, nearly 5,000 oil wells remain active in Los Angeles County alone, many operating in communities of color, often very close to homes, schools and hospitals. Latino USA visits a neighborhood in South Los Angeles, the epicenter of an anti-oil-drilling movement that is gaining momentum. We meet Nalleli Cobo, the 18-year-old...

Duration:00:32:22

A Conversation With Cory Booker

6/14/2019
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Latino USA continues its coverage of the field of candidates for the 2020 Democratic nomination with a conversation with Senator Cory Booker. Booker has come a long way since 1995 when, while attending law school at Yale, he moved to Newark to help the community, later moving to a housing project where he lived for a number of years before it was demolished. He became mayor of the New Jersey city in 2006, then went on to become a U.S. senator. Latino USA's Maria Hinojosa sits down with Cory...

Duration:00:28:40

Laura's Mission

6/11/2019
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27-year-old Laura Molinar was in medical school in Chicago, when she was flooded with news about the family separation crisis. Born and raised in San Antonio, Molinar felt moved to action—so she started Sueños Sin Fronteras, an organization to bring medical professionals to shelters on the border. While volunteering, Laura began to notice a need among the migrant women there—for access to birth control and emergency contraception. There was just one concern: the shelter was run by a Catholic...

Duration:00:22:23

Portrait Of: Sandra Cisneros LIVE in Chicago

6/7/2019
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Sandra Cisneros doesn't need an introduction. Her coming-of-age novel, "The House on Mango Street," has sold over six million copies and has turned the Chicago native into a household name. Earlier this year, the Mexican-American author joined Maria Hinojosa for a live conversation at the Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago. The conversation was part of WBEZ's Podcast Passport series, in partnership with Vocalo Radio. In this live and intimate conversation, Sandra Cisneros reflects on her past,...

Duration:00:31:02

A Conversation with Jeh Johnson

6/4/2019
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Since the beginning of the Trump administration, the U.S.-Mexico border and immigration policy have been front and center in public conversation. However, while the increased attention may seem new, a humanitarian crisis at the border is nothing new. Jeh Johnson was the Secretary of Homeland Security during President Obama's second term, from late 2013 to 2017. He ran the agency during a tense period—when tens of thousands of unaccompanied migrant children and families were arriving at the...

Duration:00:33:31

A Child Lost in Translation

5/31/2019
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Huntsville, Alabama has a small, but growing Latino population. It's where Teresa Matias, a single working immigrant mother from Guatemala, lived with five sons. In 2015, Teresa joined a local Catholic church and baptized her sons, and found them godparents. The godparents of her youngest son, would take a special liking to him. Over the next year, a series of events would begin to unravel—in which the godparents got lawyers and judges involved—eventually resulting in Teresa giving up...

Duration:00:37:12

Portrait Of: Elizabeth Acevedo

5/28/2019
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Elizabeth Acevedo is a Dominican-American poet and award-winning author. Her debut young adult novel "The Poet X" made the New York Times bestseller list in 2018. This May, Acevedo released her second novel "With the Fire on High," which tells the story of an Afro-Latina who dreams of becoming a chef. We sit down with Elizabeth Acevedo to talk about how storytelling became an important part of her life, her identity, and the impact of her success.

Duration:00:27:09

It's My Podcast and I'll Cry If I Want To

5/24/2019
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Five years ago, Latino USA producer Antonia Cereijido was only an intern and still in college when she did what a lot of people do when they're not sure what their life will look like after graduation: she cried in the bathroom. After wiping her eyes and returning to her desk, she tried to comfort herself by calculating how many other Latinos had cried at the same time she had. Which led her to ask herself: do Latinos cry more that other people, on average? Thus began her strange and...

Duration:00:39:36

All the World's a Coachella Stage

5/17/2019
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Early this year, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival announced their 2019 lineup, boasting over 10 Latino acts—including Bad Bunny, J Balvin and Los Tucanes de Tijuana performing on the festival's main stage. Coachella is one of the largest music festivals in the U.S. and one of the highest-grossing annual festivals. Historically, the festival's headliners have skewed white and in English, but that seems to be changing. Latino USA goes to the most Latino Coachella ever and speaks to...

Duration:00:34:22

American Flavor

5/14/2019
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Did you know that Marvin Gaye's classic song "Got to Give it Up" is influenced by the cha-cha-chá? And that the cha-cha-chá has been a part of U.S mainstream music for decades? Latino contributions to American pop music are present everywhere from salsa to punk and jazz to hip-hop and they're all celebrated in a book titled "American Sabor: Latinos and Latinas in U.S. Popular Music." One of the authors, ethnomusicologist Marisol Berríos-Miranda, joins Latino USA to discuss some of these...

Duration:00:19:38

If They Kill Me

5/10/2019
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On May 3, 2017, a young woman was found dead on the campus of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Soon after the Mexico City Attorney General's office sent out a series of tweets—that would be picked up by the Mexican media—that characterized the 22-year-old as a dropout and alcoholic. The response online was immediate: many women saw these tweets and media reports as an attempt to discredit the woman as a victim and in response, thousands of women started to tweet with the hashtag...

Duration:00:30:05