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Latino USA

NPR

Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.

Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.
More Information

Location:

New York, NY

Networks:

NPR

Description:

Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.

Twitter:

@latinousa

Language:

English

Contact:

361 West 125th Street Fourth Floor New York, NY 10027 646-571-1220


Listen on a live station

Episodes

Portrait Of: Jorge Ramos

4/23/2018
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On August 25, 2015, an encounter with then-presidential candidate Donald Trump at a press conference in Iowa changed the life of anchor and journalist Jorge Ramos. The incident altered his ideas about the role of journalism, and set him on a path that led him to create a documentary about hate in America, and now, a book. It's titled, Stranger: The Challenge of a Latino Immigrant in the Trump Era. Maria Hinojosa talks to the Emmy Award-winning journalist about his life, his new book and what...

Duration:00:18:21

Estrella

4/20/2018
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In 2017, an undocumented transgender woman named Estrella González went to court to file a protective order against her abusive ex-boyfriend. Little did she know, there were immigration agents waiting to apprehend her. Latino USA looks at the case of Estrella and explores what it tells us about how the tactics and procedures of ICE have changed.

Duration:00:31:24

The Census Controversy, Explained

4/16/2018
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"Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Dozens of states and cities are suing the Trump administration over this proposed question on the upcoming 2020 census. NPR's National Correspondent on U.S. Demographics Hansi Lo Wang joins us to break down the census and why the question of citizenship is controversial.

Duration:00:20:51

The Mothers Who Hunt for Mass Graves

4/13/2018
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When Lucy Genao and her group of mothers with missing children began excavating a barren field on the outskirts of Colinas de Santa Fe, Veracruz last year, they didn't expect to find what some call the largest mass grave in Mexico. Most of the women had never dug a garden in their backyards, let alone exhumed a body. So far, they've found 287 bodies. Latino USA joins the mothers of Veracruz as they prepare to search for a new suspected gravesite. This story was reported in partnership with...

Duration:00:30:42

"Mexicans Can't Play Basketball"

4/10/2018
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In 1939, a Mexican-American San Antonio high school basketball team shocked the nation. At the time, basketball was a white man's game, and no one expected an all-Mexican-American team to not only play basketball—but play it well. Yet at the moment of their greatest triumph, things suddenly took a turn for the worst.

Duration:00:19:12

Portrait Of: Junot Díaz

4/6/2018
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Recently, Dominican-American author Junot Díaz surprised some of his readers when he announced that he would be publishing a new work, a children's book titled Islandborn. Díaz is the Pulitzer-winning author of books such as The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and Drown. Islandborn follows Lola as she learns about the beauty of the island where she was born, through the memories of neighbors and family. Maria Hinojosa sat down with Díaz to discuss the process of writing Islandborn and...

Duration:00:19:05

How I Made It: Yesika Salgado's Love Poem to Los Angeles

4/4/2018
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Yesika Salgado is a Los Angeles-based Salvadoran poet. Her newest book of poetry, Corazón, is an intimate look at her childhood, her parent's home country of El Salvador, and personal experiences of love and loss as a self-described "fat brown woman" living in L.A. On this installment of Latino USA's "How I Made It" segment, Salgado breaks down her love poem to Los Angeles titled, "What I Know."

Duration:00:09:29

Portrait Of: Leafar Seyer, Cholo Goth

4/2/2018
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"Cholo Goth" is a term coined by Leafar Seyer as a way to identify himself as a person living in multiple worlds. Born Rafael Reyes, he rose to fame with the electronic band Prayers in 2013. The band's dark visual aesthetic and often brutal lyrics are inspired by his tumultuous personal life as a former gang member and Luciferian. That pain has crossed over to art; he's currently exhibiting his first art show, "The Pain Isn't Over," in L.A. Maria Hinojosa sits down with Leafar Seyer to...

Duration:00:20:51

Foreigner at Birth

3/30/2018
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On the campaign trail, President Trump said that he wanted to revoke birthright citizenship for so-called "anchor babies," aka the children of undocumented immigrants. Today, Latino USA looks at the story of a country where that actually happened: the Dominican Republic. After a court decision in 2013 that stripped citizenship from the children of Haitian immigrants, one young man embarks on a quest to get documented—in the country where he was born.

Duration:00:27:59

Portrait Of: Luis Fonsi

3/27/2018
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While the world may know Luis Fonsi for his massive single, "Despacito," the Puerto Rican singer has had a thriving 20-year career in the Latin music industry. From his first album in 1998, Comenzaré, to his latest release, "Échame La Culpa," featuring Demi Lovato, Fonsi has showcased his wide-ranging love for music that led him to become the artist he is today. Maria Hinojosa sits down with Luis Fonsi to discuss everything from his childhood to his influences and yes, "Despacito."

Duration:00:19:16

The Incident

3/23/2018
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A violent crime and a teenager from New York. What kind of punishment should a young person get for committing a horrible act? That's the question we try to answer today with a story from "Caught," a new podcast from WNYC Studios about the lives of kids caught up in the juvenile justice system.

Duration:00:39:08

How Peruvian Psychedelic Cumbia Made Its Way to L.A.

3/20/2018
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The '60s and '70s are known as a golden age of music in the United States: the age of rock, funk and salsa. But more than 3,000 miles down south in Peru, there was another golden age brewing, a style of Peruvian cumbia called "chicha." Over the past decade, there's been a chicha revival outside of Peru. One of the people involved is Jason Zepeda, the lead vocalist of a Los Angeles band called La Chamba. In this segment of "How I Made It," Zepeda recalls how La Chamba covered a 1979 chicha...

Duration:00:12:37

Livin' Lagordiloca

3/16/2018
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Priscilla Villarreal, who calls herself "Lagordiloca," has become a highly controversial social media sensation in the border city of Laredo, Texas. Each night, Lagordiloca drives through the streets of Laredo chasing and live-streaming violent crime scenes, accidents and immigration raids. She has never had any training as a reporter, yet she has almost as many followers as Laredo's largest daily newspaper. But her unfiltered reporting style has landed her in trouble with the local police.

Duration:00:34:17

Pump Up The Jam

3/13/2018
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Latino USA sits down with Guadalupe Rosales of Veteranas and Rucas and Map Pointz, two archival projects focused on the backyard party scene of 80's and 90's Los Angeles, that celebrate big hair, house music and endless nights. Rosales is joined by Eddie Ruvalcaba who photographed the scene with Streetbeat Magazine and attended parties as a teenager. The two speak about the power of documenting youth culture and why those parties still mean so much to them— and everyone else.

Duration:00:22:00

They See Me Rollin'

3/9/2018
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On January 15, Jorge Garcia was deported to Mexico after living in the United States for 30 years. The news of Garcia's deportation made headlines not only locally, but nationally—and it caught the eye of one unexpected character: Chamillionaire. The rapper's response received both praise and backlash. In this segment, Latino USA takes a look at relations between African-American and Latino communities in the U.S. and exposes topics that are not talked about publicly between both communities.

Duration:00:22:17

Rodeo

3/2/2018
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Rodeo—the Spanish word for "rounding up"—is a multi-million dollar sport in the U.S., but it's rooted in the riding, roping, and cattle ranching skills brought by Mexican cowboys to the Southwest hundreds of years ago. Today, most of the top professional rodeo athletes are white, but if you take a closer look, there are a large number of Mexican-American cowboys who live and breathe the sport. Latino USA visits the Tucson Rodeo, also known as La Fiesta de Los Vaqueros, and follows one...

Duration:00:42:06

Portrait Of: Valeria Luiselli (Live at the 92Y)

2/27/2018
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Valeria Luiselli is an award-winning Mexican writer and novelist who lives in New York City. Her most recent book, "Tell Me How it Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions," chronicles her experience as a translator for Central American unaccompanied minors, revealing the humanity behind a bureaucratic process. Maria Hinojosa recently spoke to Valeria at a live event at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan, and here on the podcast, we're sharing part of that conversation. Valeria touches on everything...

Duration:00:27:03

Marie From Missouri

2/23/2018
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With the deadline for DACA to expire approaching, we visit the story of a woman who was part of the first wave of Dreamer activists. Marie Gonzalez-Deel and her family were outed as undocumented in 2001. That's when she reluctantly became an activist fighting for a pathway to citizenship for young immigrants. Marie's story is featured in a new book about the Dreamer movement by Laura Wides-Muñoz, titled "The Making of a Dream." Maria Hinojosa sits down Gonzalez-Deel and Wides-Muñoz to talk...

Duration:00:31:28

Afro-Latinodad: Who Gets to Claim It?

2/20/2018
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February is Black History Month, and part of that history includes the contributions and experiences of Latinos of African descent—who have and are currently navigating what it means to be both Black and Latino in the U.S. So to mark that, we revisit a conversation in which friends of Latino USA discuss their experiences of being Afro-Latinos. We asked some fundamental questions: What is Afro-Latinidad? And who get to claim it?

Duration:00:22:29

All They Will Call You Will Be Deportees

2/16/2018
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After a fiery plane crash in 1948, all 32 people on-board died—but they weren't all treated the same same after death. Twenty-eight of the passengers were migrant Mexican workers and were buried in a mass grave. The other four were Americans and had their bodies returned to their families for proper burial. It took the work of a determined Mexican-American author to find out who the Mexican passengers were and tell their stories. Latino USA follows Tim Hernandez on his 7-year journey to...

Duration:00:35:04

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