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Rural Roots Rising

Storytelling Podcasts

Rural Roots Rising is a monthly podcast by and for rural Oregonians who are creatively and courageously building stronger and more vibrant communities for a just democracy. Rural Roots Rising centers organizing stories and lessons from powerful multiracial organizing across rural and frontier Oregon and focuses on the issues that matter to rural Oregonians most, including migration, affordable housing, disaster response, and more. Visit RuralRootsRising.org for rural organizing resources and to learn more about the featured organizers! Rural Roots Rising is produced by the Rural Organizing Project, a statewide network of over 65 human dignity groups organizing to advance democracy and human dignity across small town, rural, and frontier Oregon. Learn more at rop.org!

Location:

United States

Description:

Rural Roots Rising is a monthly podcast by and for rural Oregonians who are creatively and courageously building stronger and more vibrant communities for a just democracy. Rural Roots Rising centers organizing stories and lessons from powerful multiracial organizing across rural and frontier Oregon and focuses on the issues that matter to rural Oregonians most, including migration, affordable housing, disaster response, and more. Visit RuralRootsRising.org for rural organizing resources and to learn more about the featured organizers! Rural Roots Rising is produced by the Rural Organizing Project, a statewide network of over 65 human dignity groups organizing to advance democracy and human dignity across small town, rural, and frontier Oregon. Learn more at rop.org!

Language:

English

Contact:

5035438417


Episodes

Behind the Scenes With Tea, Toast, and Truth

7/14/2021
This is the Final Episode in Season 2 of Rural Roots Rising! We go behind the scenes of Tea, Toast, and Truth and talk with Ashland High School’s Truth to Power Club about how they pair education and action through their podcast and community organizing campaigns. If you missed last month, be sure and check out that episode to hear a shortened version of their work, Seeing Homeless. The transcript of this episode will be available at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: Tea, Toast, and Truth is a podcast created by Ashland High School’s Truth to Power Club. You can follow Truth to Power on Facebook and Instagram. The show is produced collaboratively and is part of the club’s broader efforts to tackle important issues such as racism, mental health, the housing crisis and more. This episode features hosts and producers Izabella Cantu, Isadora Millay, and Anya Moore discussing their response to the murder of Aidan Ellison, a Black teenager who was killed by a white man in Ashland last November. Shortly after Aidan's murder, Southern Oregon Black Leaders, Activists, and Community Coalition's leadership team pointed out that “the Black community in Ashland is less than 2% of the total population, but now makes up 100% of the homicide victims in our town.” Since then, Truth to Power organized multiple workshops on anti-racism, started work on a podcast episode and are planning a mural on Ashland Highschool to celebrate Ashland Highschool graduates who are Black Indigenous and People of Color. The mural will include Aidan Ellison and Michelle Alexander, author of the book, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration, in the Age of Colorblindness. You can listen to full episodes of Tea, Toast, and Truth on Spotify or Anchor FM. Do you know a rural media maker we should connect with? Did Truth to Power’s work inspire you to take action on the issues that matter most in your community? Head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project and how you can get involved or reach out to us at info@ruralrootsrising.org. We featured music from The Road Sodas, Junior 85, and Ben Von Wildenhaus. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

Community Media Spotlight: Tea, Toast, and Truth

6/15/2021
In our second season of Rural Roots Rising, we’ve been on a state-wide mission to explore community-based, intergenerational, collaborative, rural media. Join us this month as we feature Tea, Toast, and Truth, a podcast created by Ashland High School’s Truth to Power Club. This podcast is a great example of everyday people using DIY media to amplify local voices and create community-driven change. Rural Roots Rising is both a podcast and a radio show airing on 20 community radio stations, and it’s also an ongoing experiment in building up our media skills across rural Oregon. We’re halfway through our second season, where we’re digging deep into how rural media makers do what they do. This episode features the work of creative high school students who are willing to explore complex issues in their community, all while teaching themselves how to create a podcast for the first time! We’re showcasing their second episode, “Seeing Homeless.” They describe the episode as one focusing “on the struggles and biases that surround the homeless crisis.” Truth to Power interviews members of the homeless community, home free and homeless rights activists, and the Ashland Chief of Police, and ask community members to take on an active role as an ally for the unhoused community. Download this episode’s transcript at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: Tea, Toast, and Truth is a podcast created by Ashland High School’s Truth to Power Club. The show is produced collaboratively and uplifts diverse voices and offers a teen point of view. This episode is part one of a two-part series highlighting the Tea, Toast, and Truth podcast and features hosts and producers Izabella Cantu, Isadora Millay, and Anya Moore. They interview housing rights activists and many voices from the unhoused community, along with Ashland Chief of Police Tighe O’Meara. Together they touch on the criminalization of the unhoused community and the barriers to access many people face. You can listen to full episodes of Tea, Toast, and Truth on Spotify or Anchor FM. If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are making media and building stronger communities in your area, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project and how you can get involved or reach out to us at info@ruralrootsrising.org. We featured music from Daniel Birch and The Road Sodas! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:02

Behind the Scenes with KPOV & The Point

4/14/2021
This month’s episode continues our community media spotlight series with a behind-the-scenes interview with KPOV 88.9 FM, High Desert Community Radio station manager Bruce Morris. This episode is the second in a two-part profile of KPOV and features Bruce discussing KPOV’s early history and the role of local stations in community organizing. Bruce also shares firsthand insight on both the future of radio and the ways that community organizers can and should partner with their local stations. If you haven’t already heard it, we recommend listening to part one, Community Media Spotlight: KPOV & The Point, first. Find out when your local radio station is playing Behind the Scenes with KPOV & The Point at ruralrootsrising.org! This episode’s transcript will be available at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: ROP Director Jess Campbell interviews KPOV’s station manager Bruce Morris and together they explore the role of community stations in providing credible information via local voices, the longevity and sustainability of radio waves and audio-based programming, and local radio as a resource for community organizers. You can listen to full episodes of The Point at kpov.org. To learn more about Bruce’s organizing work in Deschutes County historically, listen to “Building Community Power” from Season 1 of Rural Roots Rising. You can check out more episodes of Rural Roots Rising at ruralrootsrising.org. If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are making media and building stronger communities in your area, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project and how you can get involved or reach out to us at info@ruralrootsrising.org. We featured music from Deef, Monk Turner, and The Road Sodas! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:28:58

Community Media Spotlight: KPOV & The Point

3/15/2021
This month’s episode continues our community media spotlight series by highlighting KPOV & The Point, a daily radio show hosted by a rotating cast of hosts at KPOV 88.9 FM, High Desert Community Radio. This episode is part one of a two-part series! In this first episode, you will hear how The Point and KPOV support and resource community organizing in Central Oregon. In our next episode, we’ll go behind the scenes with one of The Point’s hosts, KPOV Station Manager, and community organizer Bruce Morris! Find out when your local radio station is playing Community Media Spotlight: KPOV & The Point at ruralrootsrising.org! This episode’s transcript will be available at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: This episode is part one of a two-part series focused on KPOV & The Point. This month’s episode demonstrates how community radio stations keep our communities safer, informed, and engaged through COVID-19, paramilitary movements, and beyond. First, we hear Bruce Morris interview and brainstorm with Janet Sarai Llerandi, Founder and Executive Director of Mecca Bend, in March 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic was declared and was obviously disproportionately impacting Central Oregon’s communities of color. Mecca Bend is an online directory assistance program that enables the Latinx Community of Central Oregon to find the necessary resources for work support programs, family assistance, education, housing, local events, and much more. Then we hear an episode from The Point from 2018 where Bruce interviewed Jess Campbell, Rural Organizing Project’s Executive Director, about the growing threats of white nationalist and paramilitary movements. To learn more about paramilitary movements and how rural Oregonians have successfully organized to keep their communities safe in the face of overt paramilitary violence, check out Up in Arms: A Guide to Oregon’s Patriot Movement. You can listen to full episodes of The Point at kpov.org. To learn more about Bruce’s organizing work in Deschutes County historically, listen to “Building Community Power” from Season 1 of Rural Roots Rising. You can check out more episodes of Rural Roots Rising at ruralrootsrising.org. If Janet’s stories about the lack of internet access in Central Oregon resonated with you, check out the Roadmap to a Thriving Rural Oregon. Rural community leaders and organizers are working together across Oregon to increase reliable and affordable internet access for rural communities. Learn more at rop.org/roadmap! If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are making media and building stronger communities in your area, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project and how you can get involved or reach out to us at info@ruralrootsrising.org. We featured music from Ben von Wildenhaus and The Road Sodas! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:01

Behind the Scenes with Rural Race Talks

2/15/2021
Last month we introduced LaNicia Duke and her call-in program Rural Race Talks on Coast Community Radio. We recommend listening to Community Media Spotlight: Rural Race Talks first. This month’s episode, Behind the Scenes with Rural Race Talks, explores the power of learning in public with LaNicia and discusses how her radio show is an extension of her organizing. One lesson from this episode is that the small-town reality that everyone knows everyone means that the transformations made possible through rural organizing and media-making can be shared in real-time. Histories of racism in rural places are also shared histories, and reckoning with, healing from, and rebuilding requires us to have these conversations and grapple together with how to move forward. LaNicia knows that process can't happen in isolation and Rural Race Talks is one way of creating a space for that work on the air. Download this episode’s transcript at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: Rural Race Talks is a live call-in radio show hosted by LaNicia Duke on Coast Community Radio carving out space to grapple with our unique legacy of systemic racism and what that means for our present in honest and sometimes messy ways. The show comes at these conversations from multiple angles–everything from how we can begin to heal from our collective, social, and generational traumas to what 2020 taught us about race. LaNicia is a self-identified “brown-skinned girl” and community organizer in Tillamook County, which is nearly 94% white. She considers the radio show an extension of her organizing and the real-life conversations she has off the air with her friends and neighbors. Check out full episodes of her show at coastradio.org. This episode has also created unexpected opportunities for collaboration and connection. In February, as we produced this episode, LaNicia also interviewed Hannah Harrod, an organizer at ROP and this episode’s host, as part of a Rural Race Talks episode. Listen to that episode in the Coast Community Radio archives. To learn more about LaNicia’s organizing work in Tillamook County and beyond, visit laniciaduke.com. In this episode, LaNicia shared her work as a chef through Coastal Soul and about the power of food to bring people together. We also discussed her motivations to co-create the first Martin Luther King, Jr. Day events in Tillamook County which you can read more about in the Tillamook Headlight Herald. Interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are making media or building power in your area? Learn more about Rural Organizing Project at rop.org or reach out at info@ruralrootsrising.org. We featured music from The Road Sodas, The Library Ann’s, PC-One, and the Staple Singers. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

Community Media Spotlight: Rural Race Talks

1/18/2021
Rural Roots Rising is both a podcast and a radio show airing on 19 community radio stations, and it’s also an ongoing experiment in building up our media skills across rural Oregon. In Season 2 we are amplifying rural radio shows and digging into how they do what they do in the hopes of building up our collective rural media making abilities and supporting the work of the incredible community radio stations we partner with. In this month’s episode, we tune in to Rural Race Talks from Coast Community Radio for our first ever Community Media Spotlight. We’re excited to feature Rural Race Talks over 2 episodes! This month’s episode includes sections of LaNicia’s show, particularly her episode from November 4th, 2020, where she models what it looks like to make space on the airwaves for meeting people where they’re at. Next month, we’ll go behind the scenes to learn more about LaNicia’s organizing and the history of her show. Find out when your local radio station is playing Community Media Spotlight: Rural Race Talks at ruralrootsrising.org! Download this episode’s transcript at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: Rural Race Talks is a live call-in radio show hosted by LaNicia Duke that is carving out space for rural Oregonians to grapple with our unique legacy of systemic racism and what that means for our present in ways that are honest and sometimes messy. The show comes at these conversations from multiple angles--everything from how we can begin to heal from our collective, social, and generational traumas to what 2020 has taught us about race. LaNicia is a self-identified “brown-skinned girl” and community organizer in Tillamook County, a county that is nearly 94% white. She considers the radio show an extension of her organizing and the real-life conversations she is having off the air with her friends and neighbors up and down the coast. You can listen to full episodes of Rural Race Talks at coastradio.org. You can also check out more episodes of Rural Roots Rising at ruralrootsrising.org. To learn more about LaNicia’s organizing work in Tillamook County, go to ruralracetalks.com and love-coalition.org If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are making media or building power in your area, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project and how you can get involved or reach out to us at info@ruralrootsrising.org Did you like the music in this episode? We featured The Library Anns, Junior 85 and Aretha Franklin. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

Behind the Scenes with ROP

12/15/2020
For the last year, we’ve been producing monthly episodes of Rural Roots Rising to share stories of courageous and creative organizing across rural Oregon. But why? To get us rolling on our second season, we pulled back the curtain to share what inspired this show, and how the process of making it has changed our organizing. In this month’s episode, Behind the Scenes with ROP, we dig in with Rural Organizing Project staff members who trace the origins of our foray into audio production, starting with radio relationships dating back decades. Beyond sharing stories from across the network, one of the main goals of Rural Roots Rising is to be a resource for rural communities looking to create their own media. When we decided to figure out how to make this podcast, we wanted to make sure we were learning in public by sharing out the skills we’re honing and helping build resources that people around the state can pull from and adapt. If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are making media or building power in your area, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project (ROP) and how you can get involved. Find out when your local radio station is playing Behind the Scenes with ROP at ruralrootsrising.org! Download this episode’s transcript at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: This episode references several episodes from Season 1, including Community Radio: Tune In, Speak Out; and It Takes All of Us. You can find more episodes of Rural Roots Rising at ruralrootsrising.org We also shared about the public service announcements and radio ads that we have been creating alongside this radio show. You can find all of this content on Google Drive here. If you’re a rural media creator and would like to partner with us in sharing a story from your community, reach out to us at info@ruralrootsrising.org Did you like the music in this episode? We featured The Road Sodas, Jon Watts, and Junior 85. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! https://vurbl.com/station/925Ozy49kvK/ Support the show

Duration:00:29:01

Hindsight 2020: Telling Rural Stories

11/15/2020
Over a year ago, when ROP committed to making 13 monthly episodes to share organizing stories from across rural Oregon, we had no idea what 2020 would hold! Hindsight 2020: Telling Rural Stories features Monica Pearson with North Coast Progressive Action in Clatsop County, Rita Schenkelberg, a new city councilor-elect in Deschutes County, Brenda Flores with Raíces in Umatilla County, and Kate Orazem, ROP’s new archivist! They share stories of election organizing in their towns and the importance of both celebration and reflection in sustaining and growing our work, especially in the hardest moments. If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are building power in your area, or sharing your own rural stories to be featured on our upcoming season, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project (ROP) and how you can get involved or reach out to us at office@rop.org! Find out when your local radio station is playing Hindsight 2020: Telling Rural Stories at ruralrootsrising.org! Download this episode’s transcript at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you heard in this episode: Monica and Brenda were both featured in our first episode of the season, Anyone Can Be An Organizer, and we checked back in with them to hear about their election organizing and what’s changed for their work over the past year. You can watch one of North Coast Progressive Action's election Tik Toks here, featuring group members in T-rex and pumpkin costumes. Since we last talked with Brenda, Raíces has been fundraising and distributing money to people struggling to make ends meet through the recession. They also distributed 500 newsprint STAND Guides in English and Spanish at mask distribution events in their area. In Deschutes County, Bend elected 4 new city councilors including Rita Schenkelberg, Bend’s first person of color and openly queer person elected to the city council. Follow Rita on her website or on Facebook. The last segment of this episode is a conversation between two members of the ROP staff team: Meredith and Kate. Meredith Martin-Moats has been working behind the scenes on Rural Roots Rising since day one, editing, producing, and teaching the rest of us how to make quality radio. She sat down with Kate Orazem, ROP’s new archivist. Do you love pulling stories out of saved scraps of years past? Do you want to know what organizing looked like in your county in the mid-1990s? Reach out to Kate at kate@rop.org! She is really excited to get to know people across the network! Did you like the music in this episode? We featured The Road Sodas, Josh Woodward, Scanglobe, Robin Allender and Yacht. Support the show

Duration:00:29:01

Blackberries and Ballot Measures: 2020 Election Edition

10/16/2020
As rumors fly about who can and can’t vote by mail, and threats to a fair election escalate, rural Oregonians are sharing paper and digital STAND Election guides with their neighbors to offer clear information about how people who are displaced by the fires or who were wrongfully evicted can still vote by mail, are leading car caravans to safely drop off ballots, and surveying their local candidates! On our special 2020 election edition of Rural Roots Rising, you’ll hear from rural Oregonians about what’s at stake on Oregon’s statewide ballot measures, as well as ways to take action to encourage electoral change in your community. If this episode inspires you to take action for democracy, we have a Defend Democracy toolkit that you can find at rop.org/democracy. To access more shareable election resources in both English and Spanish including the public service announcements sprinkled throughout this episode, go to rop.org/STAND. Download this episode’s transcription at RuralRootsRising.org. Blackberries and Ballot Measuresfeatures a conversation about how the ballot measures will affect rural Oregonians between ROP organizer Hannah Harrod, Pam Reese, an ROP board member and organizer based in Echo, Oregon, and Keyen Singer, a Rural Organizing Fellow and member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation based in Mission, Oregon. We also highlight Leslie Rubenstein and Cathy Bellavita from the Blackberry Pie Society in Cottage Grove. If you’re inspired by their work sending candidates running for all state and local offices a survey to respond to in order to earn their endorsement, we can help you get involved too! Reach out to us at info@ruralrootsrising.org to share your thoughts, and get support for your organizing. Did you like the music in this episode? We featured music from The Road Sodas, Ryan Cullinane, and Ketsaa. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

It (Still) Takes All Of Us

9/15/2020
As rural Oregonians, we’re not new to taking care of each other in a crisis. In the midst of the fear and grief, we’re returning this month to the story of thousands of committed people who joined together across county lines and faiths. By bringing their skills and networks together, opening the doors of their religious meeting places for shelter, and pooling resources, they successfully ended a human rights crisis in rural Oregon. It (Still) Takes All of Us, features a story from Yamhill County about the power of interfaith organizing and the successes that are possible when hundreds of people join together in a moment of crisis. This month, we follow the story of Navneet Kaur, who took action in support of asylum seekers in rural Yamhill County with her Sikh community, Innovation Law Lab, and ICE Out of Sheridan. Navneet speaks about the community mobilization that successfully pressured ICE to release people from detention. Download this episode’s transcription at ruralrootsrising.org. More on what you hear in this episode: When she found out that people seeking asylum from across the world had been separated from their children at the US-Mexico border and sent by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to Federal Correctional Institute (FCI) Sheridan Navneet drove directly to the prison. While showing up alone didn’t work so well, she quickly began doing interfaith organizing with her temple, Dasmesh Darbar Sikh Temple and coordinating with lawyers from Innovation Law Lab to support people in winning their right to asylum, and forcing ICE to release everyone within six months. Their work did not end with the release of those detained in FCI Sheridan though. Navneet helped form the Respite Network with ICE Out of Sheridan and communities of faith across the Willamette Valley and organized over 60 volunteers into the Welcome Team. Together they picked people up when they were released from detention and drove them to temples and churches to stay for the night and supported folks as they continued on their journeys and reunited with family and friends across the United States. Do you want to form a group in your community? Check out our resources for Fostering Strong and Healthy Groups, or email office@rop.org for support. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more music by The Road Sodas, and the music platform Epidemic Sound! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

Taking Risks

8/19/2020
This month’s episode, Taking Risks highlights the voices of Suzanne Pharr, a renowned community organizer and movement elder, and Zachary Stocks, whose passion to make museums dynamic spaces accessible to everyone brought him into community organizing. Find out when your local radio station is playing Fighting for Rural and download this episode’s transcript at www.ruralrootsrising.org More on what you heard in this episode: We begin this episode with Suzanne Pharr, a community organizer and movement leader whose decades-long career includes co-founding the Arkansas Women’s Project, and writing the books Homophobia: A Weapon of Sexism and In the Time of the Right. Suzanne shares the importance of the Combahee River Collective, Sweet Honey in the Rock, and the Kitchen Table Press in her political coming of are in the 1970s. Follow these links to learn more about the work of these Black feminist visionaries. In this episode, Suzanne shares about how the Women’s Project launched the Women’s Watchcare Network, a network of people across Arkansas who documented hate and bias crimes, Ku Klux Klan activity, and the murders of women. The Women’s Watchcare Network released reports of this collectively documented information to push the envelope and raise consciousness about the crisis of domestic violence in Arkansas and nationally. Suzanne’s work with the Women’s Project brought her to Oregon to work on the No on 9 campaign to defeat Ballot Measure 9, which would have rewritten Oregon’s Constitution to legalize discrimination against LGBTQ+ people. While the No on 9 campaign focused on defeating the measure in cities, Suzanne, Marcy Westerling, Scot Nakagawa, and Pat McGuire traveled across rural Oregon to meet people and see what organizing was possible, and the Rural Organizing Project was born. This episode also features Zachary Stocks sharing being a part of the first Rural Organizing Fellowship where he created Oregon HORSE, which is short for Heritage Organizations for Rural Social Equity. Zachary traveled the state working with museums and heritage organizations to become spaces for communities to discuss the issues that matter most to the people who live there. Zachary is now the Executive Director of Oregon Black Pioneers whose mission is to research, recognize, and commemorate the culture and heritage of African Americans in the State of Oregon. If you are interested in connecting with rural Oregonians to start your own group, check out Rural Organizing Project, or reach out to us at Support the show

Duration:00:28:59

Fighting for Rural

7/15/2020
Fighting for Rural features Kim Schmith, Kelsey Olivera, and Kelly Huang of the Madras Key Club sharing a story of multigenerational small-town organizing for equity! Madras Key Club is working inside the schools to build a more inclusive Jefferson County. You’ll learn about their work celebrating their family’s traditions in a local park, distributing Christmas gifts to families who can’t afford them, ensuring high school students can succeed in small towns, and creative problem-solving in the age COVID-19. Find out when your local radio station is playing Fighting for Rural at ruralrootsrising.org! Download this episode’s transcript at ruralrootsrising.org More on what you heard in this episode: Madras Key Club hosted three cultural events over the summer of 2019 focused on Mexico, El Salvador, and Peru, the three main Latino cultures represented by people in Madras, and Key Clubbers themselves. Kim also wrote for the local Madras paper about their Mexican Cultural Day and Peruvian Cultural Day. If you are interested in connecting with rural Oregonians to start your own group, check out Rural Organizing Project’s resources here, or reach out to us at office@rop.org for direct support. To learn more about Rural Organizing Project (ROP) and how you can get involved, check out www.rop.org. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more Oregon-made music by The Road Sodas, and Diana Wild and support these local artists! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:28:59

Web Extra: Remembering Kent State

7/1/2020
Welcome to a Rural Roots Rising podcast extra! As protests of police violence against black Americans continue across the country, we have witnessed large scale police and National Guard deployment, many outfitted with intimidating and sophisticated warfighting gear. Countless videos have shown police officers and the National Guard using batons, tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets on protesters, bystanders and journalists, often without warning or seemingly unprovoked. 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of the Kent State attacks, reminding us that militarized violence is nothing new and has shaped our country, just as there have always been those who refuse to be silenced. Today we are sharing a special episode of Rural Roots Rising, Remembering Kent State, featuring the story of Joe Lewis, one of nine peaceful student activists who was wounded in the National Guard’s attack on nonviolent protesters of the Vietnam War at Kent State University on May 4th, 1970. Four students were also killed that day: Allison Beth Krause, Jeffrey Glenn Miller, Sandra Lee Scheuer, and William Knox Schroeder. Years after Kent State, Joe moved to Oregon where he became a leader with Columbia County Coalition for Human Dignity and now sits on the ROP Board of Directors. At a recent Rural Organizing Project Board of Directors retreat, Joe sat down with us to share his story. To read more about this history, Joe recommends the books Kent State; Death and Dissent in the Long Sixties by Tom Grace and Truth About Kent State: A Challenge to the American Conscience by Peter Davies. For movies, he recommends Fire in the Heartland and The Day the War Came Home. Kent State is hosting a fiftieth anniversary virtual commemoration online, including a teach-in in partnership with the Kent State Truth Tribunal. Support the show

Duration:00:29:16

Black Lives Matter: Voices of Rural Oregon

6/17/2020
We are in the midst of a global movement, with Black Lives Matter protests erupting all around the nation and beyond. Rural Organizing Project’s multiracial network of human dignity groups is answering the call. Here in Oregon, rural and small-town communities have hosted over 75 community events in every corner of the state. People are gathering on street corners, in churches and parks, and in socially-distanced car caravans to protest and hold vigil for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and the many other Black and brown people killed by police. Almost all of these protests were organized by young people braving a pandemic. In this month’s episode, Black Lives Matter: Voices of Rural Oregon, we’ll hear from protest organizers including Adriana Aquarius in Deschutes County and Gianna Espinoza in Wallowa County about why their communities are showing up in defense of Black lives. Local organizers have also been taking the energy of this moment and directing it towards organizing for racial justice on the local level. Groups in the ROP network and new groups called to action by the current uprising are digging into police and sheriffs’ budgets, calling and emailing local elected officials, and talking to their neighbors about racism and white supremacy. Following the leadership of the Movement for Black Lives, rural Oregonians are working to end systemic racism in their counties, defunding the police, and investing our resources into the things that create true safety and help our communities thrive. Get involved by emailing office@rop.org! Download this episode’s transcription at ruralrootsrising.org More on what you heard in this episode: You can learn more about the vision and demands of the Movement for Black Lives here and current opportunities for action here! Referenced in the episode, you can find the Pew Survey which found a majority of people in the US support Black Lives Matter here. ROP is holding multiple statewide calls to strategize together about how to continue our organizing in the face of intimidation and threats from white supremacist counter-protesters and to share strategies for translating the Movement for Black Lives’ demands into each county's specific context. Head to rop.org/blacklivesmatter to join us! Check out rop.org/blacklivesmatter for a list of previous and upcoming actions happening across Oregon! If you are interested in connecting with an existing group or want to start something in your town, we’d love to support you! Reach out to us at office@rop.org. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more Oregon-made music by The Road Sodas and Trouvaille. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:01

Community Radio: Tune In, Speak Out

5/15/2020
Community-based radio and other local media help us weather the storms we face, both literally and figuratively. When radio works for the good of all our neighbors, this free, accessible service, fosters the sense of belonging, resilience & connection necessary for survival. And the importance of local media has never been more clear than during this global pandemic. In Community Radio: Tune in, Speak out, we got to (virtually) talk with 4 local media creators about how public radio can be a life-saving source of information that keeps communities connected and taking action together. Join us to hear from Ana Elisa Wilson of Oregon Rural Action, Arturo Sarmiento of Radio Poder, Carol Newman of Coast Community Radio, and Connie Saldaña of KSKQ Community Radio! Interested in connecting with rural Oregonians to work on community media, or community response to emergencies in this pandemic moment and beyond? Head to www.rop.org to learn more & get involved in the Rural Organizing Project. Download this episode’s transcription at ruralrootsrising.org More on what you heard in this episode: Carol Newman helped found Coast Community Radio, KMUN, which has been on the air for 37 years! Carol hosts two music and local arts shows, and shares about KMUN's central role in navigating disaster response when a storm hit the community, knocking out power and all other forms of communication. Ana Elisa Wilson, an organizer with Oregon Rural Action, has been instrumental in getting out public service announcements over the radio to the immigrant community in Northeastern Oregon. Arturo Sarmiento is the manager of Radio Poder, KTUP, the high power station created by Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN), Oregon’s tree planter and farmworker union. Many of the voices featured on KTUP are voices never heard on commercial Spanish-language radio or by a mass audience, including young people, workers, community organizers, and Indigenous people speaking in their own languages. Connie Saldaña is a long-time activist in Jackson County, where she helps keep KSKQ Community Radio running strong. She also hosts the show: Age of Adventure: The Positive Side to Growing Old, a topic that is close to her heart and her work with elders and people with disabilities. She talks about radio as an essential public good. ROP has held five online rural strategy sessions since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic to strategize with people across the ROP network about responding to this crisis moment and organizing for the long-term changes we need. For recordings of these strategy sessions click here. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more Oregon-made music by The Road Sodas, and Trouvaille. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

Feeding Our Communities

4/15/2020
The spread of COVID-19 and the insufficient response to it, has made it much more difficult to access safe and healthy food, especially for those most vulnerable among us. Feeding Our Communities features Harry MacCormack from Sunbow Farm in Benton County, Oregon and Martina LeForce with Berea Kids Eat in Madison County, Kentucky. Both Harry and Martina have worked to fill gaps in access to food whether it be through making free meals for children or supporting organic food producers through a host of different methods. If you are interested in connecting with rural Oregonians to work on organizing for food access in this pandemic moment and beyond, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project (ROP) and how you can get involved. Download this episode’s transcription at ruralrootsrising.org Transcripciónes en Español también sera disponible pronto. More on what you hear in this episode: Harry has played a key role in creating collectives and organizations vital to local food access, including Ten Rivers Food Web, First Alternative Natural Foods Co-Op, Corvallis-Albany Farmers Market, and Oregon Tilth! He has shown a decades-long commitment to growing and distributing food in rural communities across the Willamette Valley and beyond. As part of Grow Appalachia, Martina heads Berea Kids Eat in Berea, Kentucky, which provides free meals and snacks to anyone in the community under the age of eighteen. As the Coronavirus pandemic shut down schools and workplaces across the country, Berea Kids Eat adapted quickly and creatively to continue providing food to children who needed it most. All across the country, programs like Berea Kids Eat have accessed federal funding through the USDA Summer Food Service Program to provide free meals to low-income young people. ROP has held four online rural strategy sessions since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic to strategize with people across the ROP network about responding to this crisis moment and organizing for the long-term changes we need. Watch the recording of the strategy session focused on food access, Feeding Our Communities Through Pandemic here. For recordings of other strategy sessions click here. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more Oregon-made music by The Road Sodas, and Kentucky-based artists Sam Gleaves and Deborah Payne. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:01

Building An Ever Wider Circle

3/15/2020
Building an Ever Wider Circle features Gwen Trice from the Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center in Wallowa County. Gwen is creating accessible ways for people to grapple with racism in Oregon through learning about the experiences of multicultural loggers who have called Wallowa County home for generations. If you are interested in connecting with rural Oregonians who are grappling with racism in your area, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project (ROP) and how you can get involved. Download this episode’s transcription www.RuralRootsRising.org. More on what you hear in this episode: To learn more about Gwen’s work, check out the Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center and watch the OPB documentary: The Loggers Daughter. The Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center website also has more information about ongoing programs including ones that can bring Maxville to your home town such as the Timber Culture Traveling Exhibit. To learn more about the founding of Oregon as a white utopia, we encourage everyone to watch author and educator Walidah Imarisha’s 2016 presentation “Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon?” The presentation leads viewers through a timeline of Black history in Oregon and discusses how this history continues to shape our social and political landscape. You can also check out this article by Walidah, which includes a timeline of Black history in addition to her reflections on the presentations she has done around the state. Are you part of a rural museum or heritage organization that is interested in rural social equity? H.O.R.S.E (Heritage Organizations for Rural Social Equity) has resources that can help! Check out the website to learn more. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more Oregon-made music by The Road Sodas, Gene Burnett and Plz Responder. Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

It Takes All of Us

2/14/2020
It Takes All of Us shares a story about the power of interfaith organizing and the successes that are possible when hundreds of volunteers join together in a moment of crisis. This month, we follow the story of Navneet Kaur, who took action in support of asylum seekers in rural Yamhill County with her Sikh community, Innovation Law Lab and ICE Out of Sheridan. Navneet speaks about the community mobilization that successfully pressured ICE to release people from detention. Download this episode’s transcription at www.RuralRootsRising.org More on what you hear in this episode: When she found out that people seeking asylum from across the world had been separated from their children at the US-Mexico border and sent by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to Federal Correctional Institute (FCI) Sheridan Navneet drove directly to the prison. While showing up alone didn't work so well, she quickly began doing interfaith organizing with her temple, Dasmesh Darbar Sikh Temple and coordinating with lawyers from Innovation Law Lab to support people in winning their right to asylum, and forcing ICE to release everyone within six months. Their work did not end with the release of those detained in FCI Sheridan though. Navneet helped form the Respite Network with ICE Out of Sheridan and communities of faith across the Willamette Valley and organized over 60 volunteers into the Welcome Team. Together they picked people up when they were released from detention and drove them to temples and churches to stay for the night and supported folks as they continued on their journeys and reunited with family and friends across the United States. Do you want to form a group in your community? Check out our resources for Fostering Strong and Healthy Groups, or email office@rop.org for support. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more music by The Road Sodas, and the music platform Epidemic Sound! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00

Building Community Power

1/15/2020
Building Community Power features Miriam Vargas Corona with Unidos Bridging Community in Yamhill County and Bruce Morris with KPOV, High Desert Community Radio in Deschutes County. They both won victories for human dignity by bringing people together from different segments of their communities. If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are building power in your area, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project (ROP) and how you can get involved. Download this episode’s transcription at RuralRootsRising.org. More on what you hear in this episode: In response to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detaining community members at the Yamhill County Courthouse, Unidos Bridging Community built a volunteer-run system to document constitutional rights violations by ICE through in-person video recording. Miriam Vargas Corona shares how Unidos Bridging Community worked with the community to record these violations and build towards a powerful victory of a statewide Courthouse rule banning ICE from making warrantless arrests inside and in the immediate vicinity of courthouses. Find more information about the November 14th, 2019 Oregon Supreme Court Justice ruling that Unidos helped pass here! Want to stop ICE detention and deportation from your community? Contact ROP at office@rop.org. In the early 2000s, Human Dignity Coalition brought together many different community members and human rights groups in response to an attack at a queer dance night in Bend. Bruce Morris shares how they started by hosting a screening and discussion around the 1995 documentary Not In Our Town which highlights the story of everyday people in Billings, Montana organizing to build a stronger community out of attacks on Black, Native, and Jewish communities and congregations. Let us know if you want a copy to screen in your town by emailing office@rop.org and we can send you the DVD! The Not In Our Town website also has additional films and discussion guides available. Bruce and the Human Dignity Coalition focused the energy they built from the screening on passing an Equal Rights Ordinance protecting against discrimination based on sexual orientation or sexual identity. He also shares about how this story connects to other work he has participated in in Deschutes County including creating the Social Justice Center and maintaining the strength of KPOV, Central Oregon’s community radio station. As we mentioned in this episode, ROP is taking many lessons from the Social Justice Center and other places like it as we create our new Community Organizing Center in downtown Cottage Grove. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more music by The Road Sodas, The Wild Wood, and Wilhelmina Frankzerda and support these local artists! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:28:29

Rural Community Building

12/16/2019
Rural Community Building features Martha Verduzco with Hood River Latino Network in the Columbia River Gorge and Katie Cook with Rural Voices based in Gilliam County. This episode emphasizes a core truth about rural community organizing: breaking isolation by building connections, relationships, and community through organizing is a skill that many of us learn through necessity. If you are interested in connecting with other rural Oregonians who are building community, head to www.rop.org to learn more about Rural Organizing Project (ROP) and how you can get involved. Download this episode’s transcription at RuralRootsRising.org. More on what you hear in this episode: In 2016, when the anti-immigrant scapegoating had Columbia River Gorge families feeling scared for their safety, Martha got together with other Latinx community leaders in Hood River County and started the Hood River Latino Network. Since then, they have held annual Hood River Latino Festivals in the park that, in 2019, brought together over 700 people to share music, food, and resources. The incredible organizing referenced in this episode to get ICE out of NORCOR (Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facility) might leave you wondering if your community profits off of immigrant detention and deportation. Check out this national map of ICE contracts, or contact emma@rop.org to find out more about local government contracts and how your group can get involved in the fight for migrant justice. When Katie Cook's first child was born, it became clear how vastly different access to child care was for the haves and the have-nots in Gilliam County. Katie got together with a friend to make a plan to do something about it, and together they organized the first public child care option in town, Condon Child Care, which is still going strong almost 20 years later! If you live in Gilliam, Morrow or Wheeler County and would like to connect with others like Katie in your area, check out the Rural Voices Facebook group. Do you want to form a group in your community? Check out our resources for Fostering Strong and Healthy Groups, or email emma@rop.org for support. Did you like the music in this episode? Listen to more music by The Road Sodas, Low Tide Drifters, and Diana Wild and support these local artists! Rural Roots Rising is a production of the Rural Organizing Project. Thank you for listening! Support the show

Duration:00:29:00