Research 2030-logo

Research 2030

Technology Podcasts

Connect to insights and perspectives from those leading change across the globe. When we launched the Research 2030 series early in 2020, our goal was to share voices and perspectives from an ever-changing global research community. Little did we know how quickly change would come with the emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic or the new challenges research and academic communities would be asked to tackle, from global collaboration to fight a virus to individual battles of living under lockdown. As we push forward into this new era, the need to share and connect with each other grows. Although this podcast is no substitute for a serendipitous meeting in a conference corridor, we hope it offers a chance to connect to insights and perspectives from those leading change across the globe. Join us on Research 2030, as we explore the importance of societal impact and the role of the UN Sustainable Development Goals on research, examine the impact of university rankings, delve into the growing potential of university-industry collaboration, and navigate a changing research culture. Sign up to Research 2030 through or your favorite podcast provider and so you will know whenever a new episode is released.

Location:

United States

Description:

Connect to insights and perspectives from those leading change across the globe. When we launched the Research 2030 series early in 2020, our goal was to share voices and perspectives from an ever-changing global research community. Little did we know how quickly change would come with the emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic or the new challenges research and academic communities would be asked to tackle, from global collaboration to fight a virus to individual battles of living under lockdown. As we push forward into this new era, the need to share and connect with each other grows. Although this podcast is no substitute for a serendipitous meeting in a conference corridor, we hope it offers a chance to connect to insights and perspectives from those leading change across the globe. Join us on Research 2030, as we explore the importance of societal impact and the role of the UN Sustainable Development Goals on research, examine the impact of university rankings, delve into the growing potential of university-industry collaboration, and navigate a changing research culture. Sign up to Research 2030 through or your favorite podcast provider and so you will know whenever a new episode is released.

Language:

English


Episodes

Why no university is an island: research leaders on the rise of the engaged civic institution

3/28/2022
For this compilation episode, we’ve delved into our archives to explore how the role of universities in their communities is evolving and the many factors driving that change. Find our full show notes here. You will hear clips from the following Research 2030 episodes (listed in order of appearance): Societal Impact, SDG Research & UniversitiesPerspectives on rankings from a young universityGlobal North-South Collaboration: A perspective from South Africa Collaboration between industry and academiaWhy two heads are better than one - the power of university-industry collaborationsCollaboration and data as drivers of progressBlending societal impact and research strategy - Two experts explain what needs to change and whyAnika S. Duut van Goor Toñi CaroResearch strategy: A conversation with Lesley Thompson & Holly Falk-KrzesinskiThe value of creating a healthy research cultureBye, bye, blue sky? Part 1: A conversation with Lee CroninBye, bye, blue sky? Part 2: A conversation with Andrew Hamilton

Duration:00:24:57

Blending societal impact and research strategy – two experts explain what needs to change and why

11/19/2021
In this episode, Director of AESIS Anika S. Duut van Goor and senior institutional capacity builder Toñi Caro, discuss the nuts and bolts of societal impact. They consider: "[For societal impact] you need the incentives, you need the policies, you need the skills, you need the people who are excited to move forward, you need the infrastructures… it is an all-encompassing way of working." - Anika S. Duut van Goor

Duration:00:35:22

Research strategy: A conversation with Lesley Thompson & Holly Falk-Krzesinski

10/14/2021
In this episode, Elsevier’s Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD, and Lesley Thompson, PhD, talk all things research strategy. During a wide-ranging discussion, they look at what’s changing for universities and the myriad factors driving those changes, including: “A growing number of universities at all levels in the US are instituting research development units to help bring life to their research strategies and complement the work that the researchers and faculty members are doing….And the value add to the institution isn't just the immediate research dollars or support for the involved investigators, but it is really capacity building for the institution, and those capacity building opportunities then drive some of the changes to the institution's research strategy.” - Dr. Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD See full show notes

Duration:00:44:07

From digging for dinosaurs to battling Covid: How research endeavors come together to impact society

9/15/2021
We delved into the archives for this compilation episode. With society facing challenges on an unprecedented scale, debates are rife around the question, “How should universities and their researchers prioritize research outcomes with societal impact.” In our two Bye Bye Blue Sky episodes and our interview on Societal Impact, SDG Research & Universities, societal impact was a popular topic of discussion. This episode draws together the insights of those three guest experts. You’ll hear from:

Duration:00:26:17

Collaboration and data as drivers of progress: A conversation with Professor Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz

8/12/2021
In this episode, Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz, Elsevier’s Senior Vice President of Research Networks, talks collaborations. As a former researcher, university leader, funder, and now an enabler of collaborations, Carlos has a unique perspective on these partnerships. During the course of this interview, he discusses the range of partnership models available and reflects on some of their pros and cons

Duration:00:20:29

Collaboration between industry and academia: Malcolm Skingle GSK’s Director of Academic Liaison

7/14/2021
Collaboration between industry and academia – it’s a topic that divides many scientists. For every researcher eager to embark on a new partnership with a corporate, there’s another hesitant to commit. But with public funding tight, and the issues that face society growing in complexity and urgency, the importance of these collaborations is increasing. This episode features GlaxoSmithKline’s Director of Academic Liaison, Malcolm Skingle, who has more than 20 years’ experience working on these collaborations. With the help of old friend and Elsevier Vice President of Academic Relations, Lesley Thompson, he explores: benefits“myths”questionsFeatured in this episode (Link to full show notes here) Professor Malcolm Skingle Director of Academic Liaison at GlaxoSmithKline and guest speaker Malcolm has a BSc in Pharmacology/Biochemistry and a PhD in Neuropharmacology. He has worked in the pharmaceutical industry for over 40 years and gained a wide breadth of experience in the management of research activities. He coordinates Academic Liaison at GSK, managing staff in the US and UK. He sits on many external bodies, including the REF2021 Main Panel A and the BBSRC Council, and chairs several groups. Malcolm was awarded a CBE in 2009 in recognition of his contribution to the pharmaceutical industry. He has also been awarded an Honorary Professorship from the University of Birmingham and an honorary DSc from the University of Hertfordshire. Malcolm was elected a Fellow of the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London in 2011 and an honorary fellow of the British Pharmacological Society in 2020 Lesley Thompson, PhD Vice President Academic Relations at Elsevier and guest host Lesley joined Elsevier in 2016 as Director Academic & Government Strategic Alliance in the UK. Previously, she worked for 26 years at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the largest of the UK’s seven research councils. At Elsevier, Lesley plays a leading role in advancing Elsevier’s initiatives to help universities, funding bodies and governments achieve their strategic objectives. She is a member of the Royal Society Diversity group, and, in January 2016, was awarded an MBE for services to research. Lesley has a PhD in Biology from the University of Essex and is married with children. Giacomo Mancini, PhD Business Development Manager at Elsevier and lead host of the Research 2030 podcast Giacomo is a Business Development Manager at Elsevier and lead host of Elsevier’s Research 2030 podcast series. He received his PhD in Developmental and Evolutionary Biology from New York University and has a vast amount of research experience, having held positions as a Scientist and Research Associate at Johnson & Johnson and Mount Sinai Innovative Partners. While he’s passionate about analytics and bibliometrics, you may also find him reading the sports section of fivethirtyeight.com or tracking MLB player statistics on baseballreference.com. Go Mets!

Duration:00:34:01

Global North-South Collaboration: A perspective from South Africa with Dr. Jennifer Thomson

6/16/2021
“Increased collaborations can save considerable time and money, and most often, breakthrough research comes through collaborative research rather than by adhering to tried and true methods” (Bensal, et al., 2019) In this episode, we explore collaboration between the Global South and the Global North with our hosts, Ylann Schemm and Ian Evans from Elsevier, as they talk to our guest, Dr. Jennifer Thomson, Emeritus Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Cape Town, and President of the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD). Episode Voices Jennifer Thomson Emeritus Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Cape Town President of the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) Prof. Jennifer Thomson is currently Emeritus Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Previously, she was Associate Professor at the University of the Witwatersrand and Director of the Laboratory for Molecular and Cell Biology for the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, before becoming Head of the Department of Microbiology at UCT. Thomson has won numerous prestigious awards and fellowships, including the L’Oreal/UNESCO prize for Women in Science for Africa in 2004 and an Honorary Doctorate from the Sorbonne University. Her research field is the development of genetically modified maize resistant to the African endemic maize streak virus and tolerant to drought and she has published three books on Genetically Modified Organisms: Genes for Africa, Seeds for the Future, and Food for Africa. She is a member of the board of the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF), based in Nairobi and vice-chair of ISAAA (International Service for the Acquisition of AgriBiotech Applications). Prof. Jennifer Thomson also serves on the National Advisory Council on Innovation of the South African Minister of Science and Technology. Guest Hosts: Ylann Schemm As Director of the Elsevier Foundation, Ylann Schemm drives technology-enabled partnerships to advance diversity in science, build research capacity and support global health around the world. She has been an integral part of the Foundation’s growth since joining as a Program Officer in 2008. In addition, Ylann currently serves as Elsevier’s Director of External Partnerships, building on 15 years in corporate relations and responsibility roles and focusing on key technology, gender and sustainability collaborations. Ian Evans Ian Evans is Content Director for Global Communications at Elsevier. Previously, he was Editor-in-Chief of Elsevier’s Global Communications Newsroom. Based in Oxford, he joined Elsevier six years ago from a small trade publisher specializing in popular science and literary fiction. Prior to this he worked for several years on a leading trade magazine for the electrical retail industry, reporting on new technologies and market trends in consumer electronics. He holds a degree in English literature from the University of Wales, Cardiff, and spends his spare time reading, writing, and playing drums.

Duration:00:18:41

The value of creating a healthy research culture: Dr. Judson Brewer

5/19/2021
In this episode, host Claudio Colaiacomo welcomes renowned neuroscientist, psychiatrist, book author and mindfulness expert, Dr. Judson Brewer to the show. Together they discuss the crucial role mental wellbeing programs and support play in cultivating a positive research culture. See full show notes and guest biographies Featured Guest Dr. Judson Brewer, Director of Research and Innovation at the Mindfulness Center and associate professor in psychiatry at the School of Medicine at Brown University Dr. Judson Brewer is the director of research and innovation at the Mindfulness Center and associate professor in psychiatry at the School of Medicine at Brown University, as well as the executive medical director of behavioral health at Sharecare. His new book is called Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind Guest Host and Interviewer: Claudio Colaiacomo, Vice President for Academic Relations at Elsevier As well as being Vice President for Academic Relations at Elsevier, Claudio Colaiacomo is also a Mindfulness trainer and coach. Claudio Colaiacomo holds a degree and a masters in physics, an MBA and a Masters in contemplative neurosciences from the University of Pisa. He is a Mindfulness trainer and coach interested in fostering mental wellbeing in complex organizations and academia. In his earlier career, he has worked as a researcher in the US and Austria after moving to Elsevier where he covered several managerial roles. Today he is Vice President for Academic Relations: a role where he meets with the management of research institutions in Southern Europe and the media with the aim of exploring synergies and new ways to serve the scientific community. He’s an expert on the publishing industry and his interests include physics, history and philosophy. He is an experienced speaker and published author himself. Claudio is 49 and lives in Rome with his family.

Duration:00:29:59

Perspectives on rankings from a young university: César Wazen, Qatar University

4/14/2021
In this episode, host Giacomo Mancini welcomes César Wazen to the show. Cesar is the Director of International Affairs at the University of Qatar and brings the perspective of “young” university and the world of University Rankings to the Research 2030 podcast. Link to our full show notes To understand how a university is performing on the global stage, many turn to the ranking systems developed by organizations such as Times Higher Education, QS and Shanghai. However, there is a growing shift pushing rankings beyond traditional models based on publication data. Some rankings look at a subject area, emphasize teaching, compare universities in different regions, and ones that look specifically at newer universities. Increasingly, institutions are also being asked to demonstrate that their research benefits society in some meaningful way. Additionally, in 2015, the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set an ambitious 2030 target to achieve an equitable future for all. Aligning research with the SDGs has offered the academic community a valuable lens to evaluate their progress and demonstrate their societal impact. This is supported by the global Impact Rankings, which were launched in 2019 by Times Higher Education to track and report on universities’ contributions towards the UN goals. In this episode, we explore how the complex requirements of all these individual rankings align with the goals and aspirations of a relatively young institution like Qatar University and, what, if any, benefits do the rankings bring them. Episode Voices: Guest César Wazen: Director of International Affairs, Qatar University César Wazen’s interests in rankings, academic accreditation and student assessment are backed by extensive experience teaching mathematics and statistics as well as in whole-school accreditation. He holds a BSc in mathematics, a teaching diploma and a master’s in educational administration and policy studies, all from the American University of Beirut and currently pursuing doctoral studies in European and International Studies Learn more about the Qatar University office of Research Support from their blog: http://blogs.qu.edu.qa/orsg/ Host: Giacomo Mancini, PhD Business Development Manager at Elsevier and lead Host of the Research 2030 podcast Dr. Giacomo Mancini is a Business Development Manager at Elsevier and lead host of Elsevier’s Research 2030 Podcast Series. He received his PhD in Developmental and Evolutionary Biology from New York University and has a vast amount of research experience, having held positions as a Scientist and Research Associate at Johnson & Johnson and Mount Sinai Innovative Partners. While he’s passionate about analytics and bibliometrics, you may also find him reading the sports section of fivethirtyeight.com or tracking MLB player statistics on baseballreference.com. Go Mets! Questions about this episode? Contact us at Research2030@elesevier.com

Duration:00:37:17

Societal Impact, SDG Research & Universities: A conversation with Professor Aluísio Segurado of University of São Paulo

3/17/2021
Five years ago, the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set an ambitious 2030 target to achieve an equitable future for all. Aligning research with the SDGs has offered the academic community a valuable way to demonstrate their impact. Then, in 2019 Times Higher Education launched its global Impact Rankings to track and report on universities' contributions towards the UN goals. In this episode, our host Fernanda Gusmao, an Elsevier Solutions Manager, speaks with Professor Aluísio Segurado, Head of Research at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. Professor Aluísio shares insights into the university's progress toward meeting the UN SDGs, their recognition in THE Impact Rankings, and how their work benefits both the University of São Paulo and Brazil. Visit our webpage for the full show notes About our guests: ALUÍSIO SEGURADO Professor, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo , Brazil MD, MSc and PhD. Full Professor in the Department of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo. While a full professor in the Department of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Aluísio is also in charge of the university institutional research office at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. The office manages the academic data to provide feedback to the university governance, particularly to the Rector’s office and to the academic community. His research focuses on human retroviral infections (HIV/AIDS and HTLV) with a particular interest in understanding the vulnerability of different population groups to viral acquisition, disease progression and response to interventions. His academic activities cross disciplines and encompass the fields of molecular virology, clinical medicine and public health. Visiting Scientist at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and also Technical advisor to the WHO. FERNANDA GUSMÃO Fernanda Gusmão is a research information manager at Elsevier. In this role, she supports universities and governments with research evaluation, development of collaboration strategies and impact assessment. Fernanda holds a Master's degree from the London School of Economics and a Bachelor's degree in International Relations. Professor Aluisio and Fernanda did a similar podcast last year in Portuguese. You can also listen to that episode here: Listen in Portuguese

Duration:00:35:29

Research 2030 Season 2 Trailer (2021)

2/25/2021
When we launched the series early in 2020, our goal was to share voices and perspectives from an ever-changing global research community. Little did we know how quickly change would come with the emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic or the new challenges research and academic communities would be asked to tackle; from global collaboration to fight a virus to individual battles of living under lockdown. As we push forward into this new era, the need to share and connect to one another grows. Although this podcast is no substitute for a serendipitous meeting in a conference corridor, we hope it offers a chance to connect to insights and perspectives from those leading change across the globe. Join us on Research 2030, as we explore the importance of societal impact and the role of the UN Sustainable Development Goals on research, examine the impact of university rankings, delve into the growing potential of university-industry collaboration, and navigate a changing research culture.

Duration:00:01:21

Dr. Tony Boccanfusos quote

10/21/2020

Duration:00:00:35

Why two heads are better than one – the power of university-industry collaborations

9/23/2020
In this episode, we turn our focus to university-industry collaboration, a form of partnership that is growing in popularity in many parts of the world. There are big rewards up for grabs, and both industry and academia benefit; for example, increased career opportunities, a bigger funding pot, exchange of knowledge, access to hard-to-find skills, extended networks, and the potential to speed up discoveries. Many also see these collaborations as the most promising avenue to tackle global challenges like the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change. Joining us for this discussion are Tony Boccanfuso, President and CEO of the University Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP), along with our guest host, Ann Gabriel, Senior Vice President for Academic & Research Relations, Global Strategic Networks, Elsevier. Listen to and hear why Tony believes that industry/academic collaborations have never been so important as now – that they offer a promising path to solving some of the grand challenges our society faces today. SHOW NOTES Guest: Anthony Boccanfuso, President and CEO of UIDP As UIDP’s President and CEO, Tony is a leading expert on university-industry relations. Over the past 32 years, he has gained significant experience and insights by working in the academic, corporate, government and non-profit sectors. He also serves as a consultant for government agencies, non-profit organizations and corporations and currently serves on the Cisco Advanced Security Research Advisory Board. Tony holds a doctoral degree in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor of science degree in Chemistry and Political Science from Furman University. He is married to Dr. Laura Boccanfuso, who founded Van Robotics, a start-up that supports the educational needs of primary school students; along with their three children, they reside in Columbia, SC. Guest Host: Ann Gabriel Senior Vice President for Academic & Research Relations, Global Strategic Networks, Elsevier Ann Gabriel and Elsevier's global team engage with key stakeholders across the research enterprise to establish strategic collaborations and to use analytics and data to address societal challenges in the area of sustainability, diversity and inclusion, and open science. She has held a variety of positions at the forefront of scholarly communication, most recently as Elsevier’s Publishing Director for journals in Computer Science and Engineering, as well as electronic product development for Elsevier’s ScienceDirect platform. Ann was previously with Cambridge University Press. Ann represents Elsevier on several STM (Scientific, Technical & Medical) industry committees, including the CHORUS board and RA21 (Resource Access for the 21st Century), each with a mission to enhance access to scientific data and publication. Ann holds a master’s degree in communications from the University of Pennsylvania. We would like to hear from you. Take this survey to send us your feedback. We would like to get your input on Research 2030 to find out why you chose to listen and what topics interest you. Click on the link above to take our short, and anonymous, survey. You can also reach us at: Research2030@elsevier.com Thanks for listening!

Duration:00:40:22

Can the reward system learn to love open science? Part 2: Véronique de Herde

9/7/2020
As we discovered in our last episode, episode 8, open science is driving new, more transparent and collaborative ways of working and sharing, which aim to help everyone access, participate in and benefit from scientific endeavour. The movement has been gaining momentum over the past decade and the COVID-19 crisis has only accelerated its growth, with nations, institutions, and publishers openly sharing data and studies on an unprecedented scale. In this episode, Stephane Berghmans speaks with early career researcher Véronique de Herde, whose passion for open science was sparked by her volunteer role with Eurodoc - the European Council for Doctoral Candidates and Junior Researchers. She shares her belief that open science could trigger a radical transformation of our research culture. SHOW NOTES: About Véronique De Herde https://www.linkedin.com/in/vdeherde/ Ph.D. candidate in agronomy at UClouvain - Belgium, Véronique De Herde holds a master degree in contemporary history and a master degree in bioengineering. Her interdisciplinary Ph.D. studies the transition pathways in the dairy sector of the Walloon region. Before starting her Ph.D., she has had several professional experiences in Belgium, Germany and France. Véronique acted over the last two years as Secretariat Coordinator for Eurodoc, the European Council of Doctoral Candidates and Junior Researchers. She also trained as one of Eurodoc’s Open Science Ambassadors and acted as a contact for plan S. Dedicated pianist and writer, she appreciates long walks in poetic landscapes. See her research website: https://sytra.be/fr/membre/veronique-de-herde/ Véronique was also a panelist in the recent webinar: "Open Science and the reward system: how can they be aligned". We would like to hear from you. We would like to get your input on Research 2030, find out what drew you in to listen and what topics you would like us to cover. Click on the link about to take our short, and anonymous survey! Or, you can always send us an email at: Research2030@elsevier.com

Duration:00:29:27

Can the reward system learn to love open science? Part 1 with Jean-Claude Burgelman

7/31/2020
This is the first episode in a short series discussing open science and the reward system. The open science movement has been gaining momentum over the past decade, prompting initiatives such as cOAlition S, with its plan to increase open access publications. But while the goals of open science are welcomed by many, challenges remain. And top of the list is the researcher reward system. In this first episode, host Stephane Berghmans, Elsevier Vice President of Academic and Research Relations EU, welcomes Jean-Claude Burgelman to the podcast. Burgelman is eminently qualified to talk about this topic. Not only is he a part-time Professor of open science policy at Vrije Universiteit Brussel, but was also recently Head of Unit Open Data Policies and Science Cloud at the European Commission, and an open access envoy for the organization. Show notes: Jean-Claude Burgelman was responsible for open science and data policies of DG RTD, European Commission. He joined the European Commission in 1999 as a Visiting Scientist in the Joint Research Centre (the Institute of Prospective Technological Studies - IPTS), where he became Head of the Information Society Unit in 2005. In January 2008, he moved to the Bureau of European Policy Advisers (attached to the president of the EC) as adviser for innovation policy. Since 1-10-2008, he joined DG RTD, as advisor and then Head of Unit in charge of top level advisory boards like the European Research and Innovation Area Board, the Innovation for Growth Group and the European Forum for Forward Looking Activities. Read more Frontiers in Big Data"Open Science, Open Data, and Open Scholarship: European Policies to Make Science Fit for the Twenty-First CenturyOpen science and the reward system: how can they be aligned?We would like to hear from you. We would like to get your input on Research 2030, find out what drew you in to listen and what topics you would like us to cover. Click on the link about to take our short, and anonymous survey! Or, you can always send us an email at: Research2030@elsevier.com

Duration:00:36:31

Looking beyond lockdown: PhD student, Comzit Opachaloemphan

6/23/2020
Giacomo Mancini continues to explore research life under lockdown, this time from the perspective of New York University School of Medicine and international PhD student, Comzit Opachaloemphan. Together they discuss topics ranging from how the pandemic may impact the completion of Comzit’s PhD to the benefits new online courses provide. For Comzit, although his bench research is temporarily paused, he is not. He pushes forward, looking toward new opportunities to grow and strengthen him for the future. About Comzit Opachaloemphan: Comzit Opachaloemphan is an international PhD student from Thailand, where he earned his undergraduate’s degree in Biology. He is currently conducting his PhD study in the lab of Dr. Danny Reinberg in New York University School of Medicine. His research mainly focuses on the Ant epigenetics & rejuvenation. A social hierarchy in most ants is rigid and immutable but in the Indian jumping ant, the caste system is extremely flexible and reversible. An adult ant worker with a short lifespan can differentiate into the reproductive pseudo-queen and gain up to a 5X increase in lifespan. This transition is unique and contradicts the aging dogma in most other animals, which exhibits a trade-off between lifespan and reproduction. His research goal is to find a key to the remarkable aging plasticity.

Duration:00:26:03

Adjusting to Research & Teaching Under Lockdown: The Ants Go Marching On for Clint Penick

5/13/2020
Today we find ourselves standing in a major point in history. Research life is not what it looked like just a few short months ago. We are sitting down, virtually, with various members of the research community to hear about their research life in the here and now, and the potential impact they see on the future. These are the stories of science, research and the research landscape in unprecedented times. In this episode Giacomo Mancini welcomes Clint Penick to the show. Clint is an Ecologist and Faculty member of Kennesaw State University in Georgia, USA. The work at his lab, the Penick lab, focuses on the evolution and ecological success of social insects (ants, bees, wasps, and termites). Clint shares how he has adjusted to life under lockdown, from transitioning courses online, to adjusting field courses, and to the impact the pandemic has on his field work. Show Notes: Dr. Clint Penick is an Assistant Professor at Kennesaw State University, where his research focuses on the evolution and ecological success of social insects. Current projects in his lab focus on how ants use antimicrobials to fight disease, how social insects respond to climate change, and how urban ants exploit human foods on the sidewalks of New York City. In addition to research on social insects, Dr. Penick has collaborated with engineers and designers on projects related to bio-inspired design through funding from Google and NASA. You can learn more about Penick’s lab and research at www.penicklab.com Join Penick in baking sourdough bread while contributing to research. Find out more here: http://robdunnlab.com/projects/wildsourdough/ We would like to hear from you. Take this survey to send us your feedback. Now that we are into our 5th episode, we would like to get your input on Research 2030 and find out what drew you to listen and what topics are of interest to you. Click on the link above to take our short, and anonymous, survey.

Duration:00:31:47

Bye, bye, blue sky? Part 2: A conversation with Andrew Hamilton

4/14/2020
This episode was recorded in late February, before the WHO declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic and a growing number of nations went on lock-down. However, the relationship between basic and applied research, as explored in this episode, seems even more relevant now in thinking about the future of research and solving world challenges. Expert, curated information for the research & health community on SARS-CoV-2 (the novel coronavirus) and COVID-19 (the disease) can be found on Elsevier's Novel Coronavirus Information Center. The world is facing unprecedented challenges. Some argue that blue sky, also known as basic research, is critical – that the serendipitous results it fuels provide the perfect shoulders for giants to stand upon. But, with so much at stake globally right now, is blue sky in danger of looking a little indulgent? Dr. Lesley Thompson, Elsevier Vice President of Academic and Strategic Alliances, continues to explore these questions on Research 2030. In this episode she is joined by President of New York University (NYU), Dr. Andrew Hamilton, who shares his perspective on why blue-sky and applied (mission-driven) research, can and should happily co-exist for the benefit of solving world challenges. We would like to hear from you. Take this survey to send us your feedback. Now that we are into our 5th episode, we would like to get your input on Research 2030 and find out what drew you to listen and what topics are of interest to you. Click on the link above to take our short, and anonymous, survey. SHOW NOTES Dr. Andrew Hamilton (President of NYU) Andrew Hamilton was named the 16th president of New York University (NYU) in March 2015. He most recently served as the vice chancellor of Oxford University, the university’s senior officer, after an academic career that took him from Princeton to the University of Pittsburgh, and then to Yale, where he was named provost. Throughout his time in academic leadership positions, he has maintained his scholarly work, including an active research laboratory, and will continue to do so at NYU. A distinguished chemist and a Fellow of the Royal Society, Dr. Hamilton’s scholarly work lies at the intersection of organic and biologic chemistry. He received his PhD from Cambridge University, his master’s degree from the University of British Columbia, and his undergraduate degree from Exeter University. Dr. Hamilton also hosts his own podcast, Conversations, which you can enjoy here. Dr. Lesley Thompson joined Elsevier in 2016 as Director Academic & Government Strategic Alliance in the UK. Previously, she worked for 26 years at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the largest of the UK’s seven research councils. Read more. Resources: Future-proofing research In the Research Futures report , Elsevier and Ipsos MORI, one of the world’s largest research agencies, joined forces to understand how trends – from advances in technology and funding pressures to political uncertainty and population shifts – might be fueling the changes we’ll see in the coming decade.

Duration:00:27:40

Bye, bye, blue sky? Part 1: A conversation with Lee Cronin

3/9/2020
Some argue that blue sky, also known as basic research, is critical – that the serendipitous results it fuels provide the perfect shoulders for giants to stand upon. But, with so much at stake globally right now, from climate change to population growth, is blue sky in danger of looking a little indulgent? And with public research funding under pressure and universities facing calls to focus on practical skills, is it living on borrowed time? Dr. Lesley Thompson, Elsevier Vice President of Academic and Strategic Alliances, explores these questions on Research 2030. In this episode she is joined by Regius Professor of Chemistry in Glasgow, Lee Cronin. SHOW NOTES Leroy (Lee) Cronin FRSE was born in the UK in 1973 was appointed to be Regius Professor of Chemistry in Glasgow in 2013 after being a professor (2009 & 2006) and reader in Glasgow since 2002. Read more about Cronin and about the Chemify project. Scopus author profile Dr. Lesley Thompson joined Elsevier in 2016 as Director Academic & Government Strategic Alliance in the UK. Previously, she worked for 26 years at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the largest of the UK’s seven research councils. Read more. Resources: Future-proofing research In the Research Futures report , Elsevier and Ipsos MORI, one of the world’s largest research agencies, joined forces to understand how trends – from advances in technology and funding pressures to political uncertainty and population shifts – might be fueling the changes we’ll see in the coming decade. The resulting large-scale future-scoping and scenario-planning study raised many questions and sparked interesting conversations – some of which we are capturing in this podcast. Download report here You can also send us comments or feedback at research2030@elsevier.com.

Duration:00:30:15

Don’t blame it on the pipeline: Gender disparity in invited commentaries and senior researchers

1/29/2020
In this episode, we consider the sobering results of a recent study which shows that women researchers are around 20% less likely than men to author invited commentaries for scholarly journals – even when they have the same level of experience as their male peers. Incredibly, this figure rises to 40% for more senior female scientists. Join Anita de Waard as she explores the study with two of the authors, Emma Thomas and Bamini Jayabalasingham, in an attempt to explore some of the factors attributing to their findings and the impact the results have on the larger research landscape. SHOW NOTES: Invited commentaries are short articles that provide an author’s personal perspective or view points on a leading, significant or controversial topic. Typically the invited author is a leading expert in the subject matter and usually invited by the editor. “In medical journals, publication of an invited commentary is a recognition of expertise and can raise an author’s profile.” (Emma Thomas in Women scientists author fewer invited commentaries in medical journals than men with comparable credentials) Articles mentioned in the podcast: Gender Disparities in Invited Commentary Authorship in 2459 Medical JournalsThe gender gap in science: How long until women are equally represented Related articles and interesting reads: I thought patriarchy in science was fading. Then I saw it in the dataWomen scientists author fewer invited commentaries in medical journals than men with comparable credentialsWe have a responsibility. Elsevier's Holly Falk-Krzesinski on gender equality in researchNOW AVAILABLE! The Elsevier Gender Report 2020 Gender disparity and bias in research, as explored in this podcast episode, negatively affect the breadth and impact of research, and the opportunities for researchers to advance in their careers. In order to understand this impact and overcome barriers, the global research community must closely examine the critical issues using an evidence-based approach. Elsevier has an ongoing commitment to promoting gender diversity and advancing gender equity in global research. On March 5, 2020, we published The researcher journey through a gender lens: A global examination of research participation, career progression and perceptions. This is our third report on gender and research. Download the report now here

Duration:00:26:16