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WSJ’s The Future of Everything

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What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

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United States

Description:

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

Language:

English


Episodes
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Can Robots Reinvent Fast Food?

7/19/2024
Restaurants are a tough business with tight margins, from the cost of food to paying for staff. Kernel, the new venture by Steve Ells, the founder and former CEO of Chipotle Mexican Grill, is trying to fix that by introducing food-making robots and a "digital-first" approach to restaurants. In this conversation from the WSJ Global Food Forum in June, reporter Heather Haddon talks with Ells about his new bet on consumers’ desire to eat less meat, and on a business model that could solve some of the industry’s thorny challenges. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: Rise of the Restaurant Robots: Chipotle, Sweetgreen and Others Bet on Automation How Chipotle’s Founder Is Moving Beyond Burritos Chipotle’s Labor Costs Are Rising. Customers Will See It in Pricing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:59

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Why You Might Be Eating More Seaweed in the Future

7/12/2024
To hear proponents talk about it, seaweed could solve a whole lot of problems. It could feed people, restore polluted habitats and be an economic boost for fishermen. Though seaweed aquaculture has grown in the U.S. in recent years, the country produced less than 1% of the global seaweed crop in 2019. Now, some companies are trying to get seaweed aquaculture to scale in the U.S. But there are regulatory hurdles to overcome, and researchers have questions about how a scaled industry would affect existing ecosystems. WSJ’s Alex Ossola looks at what it will take to make seaweed a bigger part of the American diet in the future. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify , or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter . Further reading: Inside the Quest for a Super Kelp That Can Survive Hotter Oceans Cows Make Climate Change Worse. Could Seaweed Help? A Sargassum Bloom Is Hitting Florida: What to Know About the Seaweed Mass Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:17:55

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How Designer Fruit Is Taking Over the Grocery Store

7/5/2024
No more mealy apples and flavorless oranges. There’s a growing category of produce available in your local grocery store: fruits and vegetables that have been carefully bred with flavor in mind. But these more delicious varieties tend to come in premium packaging—with a premium price to boot. WSJ contributor Elizabeth G. Dunn tells host Alex Ossola how this produce is bred and whether we can expect to see more of it in the future. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify , or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter. Further reading: This Strawberry Will Blow Your Mind: Inside the Startlingly Delicious World of Designer Produce The Race to Save Ketchup: Building a Tomato for a Hotter World Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:14:30

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Science of Success: The Hot Window AC Making Summers Cool

6/28/2024
They’re ugly. They’re clunky. They’re loud. And, worst of all, they spike your energy bills every summer. The window air conditioner is a dreaded summer staple in many homes. But one company is redefining how an AC functions by thinking outside the typical window box. For Science of Success, WSJ’s Ben Cohen tells the story of Midea’s U-shaped window AC that captured the collective consciousness for its noise reduction and energy efficiency. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter. Further reading: How Did the World’s Coolest Air Conditioner Get So Hot? The Race to Build a Better Air Conditioner Does Turning Off Your A/C When You’re Not Home Actually Save Money? My Love Affair With Air-Conditioning Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:11:22

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How NASA Sees Climate Change From Space

6/21/2024
Our climate is changing. In the last 100 years, the planet has warmed about 1.5 degrees Celsius, according to NASA. But how can we learn more about our planet’s climate and what we can do to slow the changes? Gavin A. Schmidt, a top NASA climate scientist and director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, spoke with WSJ reporter Emily Glazer at the Future of Everything Festival on May 22, 2024 about the future of climate science and the data NASA is collecting on the Earth by looking at it from space. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter. Further reading: 2023 Was the Hottest Year on Record Extreme Heat, Floods, Fire: Was Summer 2023 the New Normal? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:16:15

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Keeping Cities Cool in a Warmer Future

6/14/2024
2023 was the world’s hottest year on record, and temperatures are expected to continue heating up. Cities, where more than half of the world lives, are contending with this extreme heat. But some places, such as Singapore, are looking for ways to modify aspects of their cities to make them more comfortable for people to live. The Cooling Singapore project is creating a hyper detailed digital twin of the city-state to be able to test the effectiveness of new methods the city would want to implement. WSJ’s Alex Ossola explains what they’ve learned, and how it can help us understand how more cities in the future might make changes to combat heat. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify , or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter. Further reading: The Cooling Singapore 2.0 project, funded by the Singapore Nat ional Research Foundation, is led by the Singapore ETH Centre in partnership with Cambridge CARES, the National University of Singapore (NUS), Singapore Management University (SMU), the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), and TUMCREATE (established by the Technical University of Munich). 2023 Was the Hottest Year on Record Earth Just Had Its Hottest Month Ever. How Six Cities Are Coping. How Reflective Paint Brings Down Scorching City Temperatures These Photos Show How Urban Growth Fuels Extreme Heat Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:18:38

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Saving Ketchup: The Race to Breed a Tomato for a Warming World

6/7/2024
What good is a future without ketchup or pasta sauce? These are just two potential casualties of a changing climate, as tomato growers face shrinking harvests due to hotter and drier weather. WSJ reporter Patrick Thomas takes us behind the scenes of how seed breeders are trying to make a tomato that can thrive with less water, and how that highlights the efforts going into protecting crops against the effects of climate change. Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: The Race to Save Ketchup: Building a Tomato for a Hotter World How to Eat Your Way to a Greener Planet Sustainable Agriculture Gets a Push From Big Corporations Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:17:17

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Science of Success: Birkenstocks and the Promise of Healthy Feet

5/24/2024
How did a sandal that originally entered the U.S. market as a health product become a fashion staple and the crowning shoe of a multibillion dollar company? Margot Fraser originally brought Birkenstocks to the U.S. thinking that the comfort of the German sandal would appeal to women. But she couldn’t get shoe stores to sell them. They finally made it into the U.S. market through health food stores. Now, the seductively ugly shoe is a cultural icon and was valued at about $8.6 billion when the company went public last year. WSJ’s Ben Cohen explores the history of Birkenstock and how it paved the way for the future of women’s feet. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: Why Americans Are Obsessed With These Ugly Sandals A Key to Birkenstock’s Billion Dollar Success? Its Frumpiest Shoe A Visual History of Birkenstock’s Rise, From Insoles to IPO Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:10:52

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Will a Treatment Work? Try the 'Digital Twin' First.

5/17/2024
How does your doctor know that a drug or procedure will work to treat a condition before they try it? Often, they don’t. Researchers are looking to create “digital twins,” digital versions of individual organs, to see how a patient will respond. Eventually there could be digital twins of entire bodies that are updated in real time with patient data. WSJ’s Alex Ossola speaks with WSJ senior special writer Stephanie Armour about how that might change the way we treat diseases in the future. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify , or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter. Further reading: A ‘Digital Twin’ of Your Heart Lets Doctors Test Treatments Before Surgery Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:09:53

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Ultrasound Isn’t Just for Pregnancy. How It’s Helping Treat the Brain.

5/10/2024
Ultrasound is known for its use in imaging during pregnancy. But new advancements in the technology suggest that in the future, ultrasound could be used to disrupt the blood-brain barrier. This would allow doctors to more easily diagnose and directly treat illnesses like brain cancer without major surgery. WSJ’s Danny Lewis and Charlotte Gartenberg examine the new ways that ultrasound could be used more specifically and subtly to deliver accurate diagnoses and precise treatments. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter . Further reading: New Ultrasound Therapy Could Help Treat Alzheimer’s, Cancer Treatment Breakthrough for an Intractable Brain Cancer The ‘Mini Brains’ solving medical mysteries and raising concerns We Can Now See the Brain Like Never Before Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:22:30

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Chip in the Brain? How Brain-Computer Interfaces Could Change Medicine

5/3/2024
A day when people can interact directly with computers using their thoughts could be on the horizon. Several companies, including Elon Musk’s Neuralink, have begun preliminary human trials of brain-computer interfaces - devices that decode the electrical signals in their brain and translate them into digital bits. Neurosurgeon Benjamin Rapoport is a co-founder and chief science officer of Precision Neuroscience, a company working on brain-computer interfaces. He spoke with WSJ’s Danny Lewis about how the technology works and how these implants could improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people who could gain the ability to independently engage with the digital world. Correction: Dr. Benjamin Rapoport is the co-founder of Precision Neuroscience. An earlier version misspelled his name Rapaport. (Corrected on May 3) What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: Inside the Operating Room: Doctors Test a Revolutionary Brain-Computer Implant Elon Musk’s Neuralink Wants to Make ‘The Matrix’ a Reality. It Has a Lot to Prove First. She Didn’t Speak for 18 Years. A Computer Helped Find Her Voice. The Devices That Will Read Your Brain—and Enhance It Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:20:47

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Science of Success: How Barnes & Noble Is Redesigning the Bookstore Chain

4/26/2024
What does the brick and mortar bookstore of the future look like? For Barnes & Noble, it looks more like the indie bookstores they once threatened to put out of business 20 years ago. The company recently redesigned their national chain of over 500 bookstores, shedding the big box personality in favor of a look reminiscent of local bookshops. On this week’s Science of Success, WSJ columnist Ben Cohen speaks to Barnes & Noble CEO James Daunt about the look, feel and idea behind Barnes & Noble’s new indie design. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Listening on Google Podcasts? Here's our guide for switching to a different podcast player. Further reading: That Cool New Bookstore? It’s a Barnes & Noble. New CEO Wants to Make Barnes & Noble Your Local Bookstore Barnes & Noble’s New Boss Tries to Save the Chain—and Traditional Bookselling Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:11:20

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Designing the Sneaker of the Future

4/19/2024
Can technology help us design the perfect running shoe that’s stronger, faster and better for the environment? David Allemann, co-founder of On, thinks technology can get us part of the way there, but it’s not the whole story. The performance running shoe and sportswear company is experimenting with computer simulation and bio-based materials to design sneakers to advance both runners and sustainability goals. WSJ men’s fashion columnist Jacob Gallagher speaks with Allemann about the future of running shoe tech and how sneakers might redefine the design cannon. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: How On’s Running Sneakers Won Over Tech Bros and High Fashion Alike Where Did All the Crazy Sneakers Go? This Designer Knows What Sneakers You’ll Be Wearing Next Year These Grandpa Sneakers Are Made in America. They’re a Hit Overseas. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:18:48

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How 3D Printing Could Drive the Factory of the Future

4/12/2024
3D printing isn’t just for hobbyists – it could be central to the future of manufacturing. Companies are turning to this technology to make everything from car and airplane parts to houses faster and cheaper than with traditional techniques. Now, as 3D printing – also known as additive manufacturing – is getting quicker, researchers are testing its limits. WSJ’s Alex Ossola and Danny Lewis take a look at how this tech is building the factory of the future. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Listening on Google Podcasts? Here's our guide for switching to a different podcast player. Further reading: This 3-D Printed Icelandic Fish-Gutting Machine Contains the Secret of a Future, Less-Globalized Economy Venture Investors Are Pumping Capital Into 3-D Printing Startups. Here’s Why. Energy Companies Turn to 3-D Printing to Bypass Snarled Supply Chains 3-D Printed Houses Are Sprouting Near Austin as Demand for Homes Grows Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:22:17

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Did Tesla’s Cybertruck Break the Mold on EV Pickup Truck Design?

4/5/2024
When Tesla started developing the Cybertruck, CEO Elon Musk tasked the company's chief designer with creating a car that "feels like the future." But did it break the mold on what a pickup truck is? And how will it change truck design in the future? WSJ auto columnist Dan Neil test drove the Cybertruck. He spoke with WSJ’s Charlotte Gartenberg about his take on Tesla’s polarizing vehicle, and what it means for the future of EV design. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify , or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Listening on Google Podcasts? Here's our guide for switching t o a different podcast player. Further reading: I Gave Tesla’s Cybertruck a 48-Hour Thrashing. It (Mostly) Survived. Tesla Hopes the Cybertruck Design Gives It an Edge Tesla Designer: Cybertruck’s Funky Design Gives It an Edge How Tesla’s Cybertruck Compares with Other Pickups Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:17:19

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Science of Success: How Self-Reporting Made Flying Safer

3/22/2024
This year, several high profile incidents have kept flying in the limelight. Yet air travel is currently safer than ever. The biggest U.S. commercial airlines have now gone 15 years without a fatal crash. So, how did hurtling through the sky in a giant metal tube become this safe? WSJ columnist Ben Cohen speaks with former FAA and International Civil Aviation Organization executive William Voss about the voluntary self-reporting programs that made flying the safest form of travel and asks if the airline industry’s safety measures could provide a blueprint for regulation in other fields. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Listening on Google Podcasts? Here's our guide for switching to a different podcast player. Further reading: Flying in America Has Actually Never Been Safer Boeing Tells Airlines to Check 787 Cockpit Seats After Mishap on Latam Flight Behind the Alaska Blowout: a Manufacturing Habit Boeing Can’t Break Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:10

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Why Waymo's Robotaxis Are Hitting the Arizona Freeway

3/15/2024
After years of promises that driverless cars were just over the horizon, one of the industry's biggest players is headed for the freeway. Now, for the first time, Alphabet’s Waymo is allowing robotaxis to take its employees on high-speed roads in Phoenix, Arizona without a human driver. The move comes just as the industry is facing a harsh reality after high-profile crashes: GM’s Cruise had its permits to operate driverless robotaxis pulled by the California DMV, and Waymo issued its first-ever recall after two of its cars collided with a pickup truck being towed. WSJ reporter Meghan Bobrowsky discusses what this could mean for the future of self-driving cars and where the industry is heading. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: Self-Driving Cars Enter the Next Frontier: Freeways Self-Driving Car Company Waymo Issues First-Ever Recall After Two Phoenix Crashes GM’s Cruise Says U.S. Is Investigating Driverless Car’s Collision With Pedestrian ​​America’s Most Tech-Forward City Has Doubts About Self-Driving Cars Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:16:25

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Recharge as You Drive? The Future of EVs Could Be Wireless.

3/8/2024
Imagine driving down a road that recharges your electric car as it moves. Companies around the world are experimenting with new technology that can wirelessly charge EVs while they drive, thanks to copper coils buried beneath the asphalt. It could mean less time spent plugging in at slow chargers, no need for heavy, expensive lithium-ion batteries and wave goodbye to range anxiety. WSJ’s Danny Lewis reports on what it would take for this tech to hit the road, and how it could change the way we refuel our vehicles. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: These Companies Want to Charge Your Electric Vehicle as You Drive No More Charging Stops? We Take a Road Trip in an Ultralong-Range EV The Big Year for EVs Gets Off to a Bumpy Start Electric Cars and Driving Range: Here’s What to Know About EV Range Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:20:12

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How Today’s Aircraft Accidents Could Make Future Planes Safer

3/1/2024
In recent months, an Alaska Airlines jet lost a door plug mid-flight, and a Japan Airlines plane collided with another aircraft at an airport in Tokyo. Accidents like these are uncommon, but they could help engineers design safer airplanes. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University associate professor Anthony Brickhouse tells WSJ’s Danny Lewis how advanced materials and computer systems could bring flight into a safer future, while making sure human pilots are still part of the equation. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: How Safe Is Flying Today? Answering Your Questions Boeing 737 MAX Missing Critical Bolts in Alaska Airlines Blowout, NTSB Says Boeing Finds New Problem With 737 MAX Fuselages Inside a Flaming Jet, 367 Passengers Had Minutes to Flee. Here’s How They Did It. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:19

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Science of Success: The Mind at Work Behind an Iconic Song

2/23/2024
Is it an earworm or an icon? The Super Mario Bros. theme is the soundtrack to many childhoods and has remained resonant today. Recently inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry, the song was not easy to write. Video game composer Koji Kondo faced musical and technical challenges in creating the song. Columnist Ben Cohen talks to New England Conservatory musicologist Andrew Schartmann about how Kondo created this lasting and genre-changing piece of music. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Further reading: The Mind Behind the Music You Can't Get Out of Your Head Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:33