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Here & Now Anytime

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The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

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The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

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@hereandnow

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Episodes
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Unpacking Kamala Harris' immigration record

7/24/2024
We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. After the assassination attempt on former President Donald Trump, Secret Service head Kimberly Cheatle resigned. The Washington Post's Carol Leonnig breaks down the history of the Secret Service and what may happen going forward. And, Vice President Kamala Harris' position on immigration could play a big role in the race for president. CBS News reporter Camilo Montoya-Galvez breaks down Harris' record. Then, as soon as Harris announced her run for president, endorsements from prominent Democrats started rolling in. But WBUR's Anthony Brooks reports on why some Dems are hesitant to back her. Plus, have you felt unsatisfied at work? You're not alone. New York University psychologist Tessa West's book "Job Therapy" challenges readers to question whether they're truly happy at work. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:35

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The memeification of Kamala Harris, explained

7/23/2024
We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is in Washington this week, where he will deliver a joint address to Congress on Wednesday. The Guardian's Andrew Roth discusses the visit and the state of the war in Gaza. Then, Joe Biden's departure from the presidential race is forcing Republicans to rethink their strategy. The Atlantic's Tim Alberta talks about what's next for the Trump campaign. And, what's the future of the Republican Party? We hear reporting from NPR's Asma Khalid, who asked Republicans about their thoughts at the RNC. Plus, is Vice President Kamala Harris ... brat? Or did she just fall out of a coconut tree? We explain the jokes that have taken the internet by storm with Vox's Rebecca Jennings. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:31:14

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Biden drops out: What's next for Democrats, Kamala Harris

7/22/2024
We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. With President Biden out of the race, Vice President Kamala Harris is racing to shore up support for her campaign. Politico's Zach Montellaro tells us what's next for the Democratic Party. Harris' former communications director, Jamal Simmons, joins us to talk about what's next for his former boss. And The New York Times' Astead Herndon discusses Harris' political rise. Plus, colleagues are remembering Texas Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee for her determination to fight for her constituents, especially women of color. Rep. Al Green of Texas looks back at her life and legacy. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:27:08

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Why some people don't have an inner voice

7/19/2024
We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. The cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike says a global Microsoft systems outage is not due to a cyber attack, but a software glitch. Wired's Lily Hay Newman tells us more. Then, in his speech Thursday night at the RNC, Trump called for healing discord and division, but he also painted a dark picture of the country. The New York Times' Adam Nagourney joins us. And, young conservatives who want to get their party to engage on climate attended the RNC this year. NPR's Ximena Bustillo reports.Plus, do you have any inner voice or monologue? Chances are you do, but new research shows some of us might not have one at all. Lead researcher Gary Lupyan explains the findings. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:24:41

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Remember Freedom Singer Bernice Johnson Reagon

7/18/2024
We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. We take the temperature on where Democrats are on President Biden staying in the presidential race with Sen. Peter Welch. He was the first Senate Democrat to call for Biden to withdraw after his "disastrous" debate performance. Then, as the Republican National Convention continues, we look at some of former President Donald Trump's policy proposals. The Wall Street Journal's Nick Timiraos and the Washington Post's Hannah Knowles join us. And, Bernice Johnson Reagon, founder of the Freedom Singers during the Civil Rights Movement, has died at 81. We remember her legacy with the Smithsonian's Krystal Klingenberg. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:26:31

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Indigenous people in the Amazon fight to save the rainforest

7/17/2024
We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. Trump's vice presidential pick J.D. Vance has ties to Silicon Valley, where a growing number of entrepreneurs are backing the former president. The Washington Post's Cristiano Lima-Strong tells us more. Then, we speak with two voters from key swing states about the 2024 presidential election and who they plan to support. And, Indigenous communities in the Amazon rainforest are building a grassroots movement to fight deforestation. Inside Climate News' Katie Surma joins us. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:29:07

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Unpacking Trump's vice president pick

7/16/2024
We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. There was much anticipation leading up to former President Donald Trump picking Sen. J.D. Vance as his running mate. Vox's Zack Beauchamp tells us about Vance and his ideology. History professor Julian Zelizer talks about how much the vice presidential pick matters to the election. Then, Foreign Policy's Ravi Agrawal discusses where Trump — if re-elected — might take the United States in trade with China, and relations with Russia and Europe. And, in a new memoir "The Lucky Ones," author Zara Chowdhary tells her deeply personal story of growing up in India during a period of anti-Muslim violence. She shares her story. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:36:01

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Trump assassination attempt: Media coverage, place in history

7/15/2024
Federal Judge Aileen Cannon on Monday dismissed the classified documents case against former President Donald Trump. NPR Greg Allen joins us to talk about why. And, former President Trump survived an assassination attempt over the weekend. Presidential historian Tim Naftali and NPR's David Folkenflik join us to talk about this moment in history and how the media is covering the shooting. Then, in "Get Met Through the Next Five Minutes: Odes to Being Alive," author James Parker writes odes to everyday life. He joins us to talk about how to find joy in the mundane. We'd love to hear your thoughts on the podcast. Take this survey. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:36:18

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What makes the perfect potato chip?

7/12/2024
After the first presidential debate, newspaper editorial boards across the U.S. called for Biden to end his campaign. The Philadelphia Inquirer instead called on Trump to leave the race. And, a number of Supreme Court decisions significantly weakened the authority of federal agencies. Slate's Mark Joseph Stern explains the far-reaching effects of these rulings. Then, what makes the ideal potato chip? WBUR staffers tried a variety and voted on their favorite ones. Here & Now's resident chef Kathy Gunst breaks down the top picks. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:25:11

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Crisis pregnancy centers in TX, 'sister senators' unite over abortion in SC

7/11/2024
A new investigation from ProPublica and CBS News found that contractors for crisis pregnancy centers are wasting millions of dollars of taxpayer money. ProPublica's Cassandra Jaramillo joins us. And, Republican state Sen. Katrina Shealy and Democrat state Sen. Margie Bright Matthews bonded over abortion rights despite party differences. They join us to discuss. Then, Dara Torres is among the most decorated female Olympians in American history. She discusses her long Olympic career and looks ahead to the Paris Games. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:43

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NATO at 75: The alliance's second-in-command on war in Ukraine

7/10/2024
NATO Deputy Secretary General Mircea Geoană joins us to discuss the alliance's 75th anniversary and its support for Ukraine. And, the Gaza Health Ministry says an Israeli airstrike killed more than 25 people in southern Gaza as ceasefire talks are expected to resume. NPR correspondent Aya Batrawy joins us. Then, musician Arlo Guthrie turns 77 on Wednesday. We share a recent conversation we had with him about his life, work and legacy. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:41

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The rise of Christian nationalism

7/9/2024
The United Nations Security Council meets Tuesday to discuss Russia's deadly missile strike on a children's hospital in Kyiv. Financial Times correspondent Christopher Miller joins us from Ukraine. And, following the first presidential debate, media coverage has largely focused on President Biden's age and competency. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik explores whether it has been fair. Then, with some states now requiring bible instruction in public schools, Tim Alberta — staff writer at The Atlantic — talks about the rise of Christian nationalism in the U.S. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:25:22

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Audiobooks to bring along on your summer travels

7/8/2024
President Biden sent congressional Democrats a letter Monday reiterating he is in the 2024 presidential race to the end. NPR's Ximena Bustillo joins us for the latest. And, Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold has been receiving threats since the beginning of her state's lawsuit to remove former President Donald Trump from its ballot. She talks about threats to election workers and other secretaries of state. Then, a left-wing coalition won the most seats in this weekend's parliamentary elections in France, but there's still the prospect of a hung parliament. The Sunday Times' Peter Conradi joins us for more on the election and what's to come. Plus, Traci Thomas of "The Stacks" podcast joins us with some audiobook recommendations perfect for this summer. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:24:47

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Best eats of summer 2024: Salads, Indian-Caribbean fusion

7/5/2024
Lord Maynard Llera of the restaurant Kuya Lord has been crowned this year's James Beard Award winner for Best Chef in California. He joins us to talk about the achievement. And, Here & Now's resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes to help you spruce up classic summer salads. Then, in his new cookbook "Mad Love," chef Devan Rajkumar shares dishes that merge his roots in Guyana, South America and the Caribbean. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:25:20

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Red, white and purple: 40 years of Prince's 'Purple Rain'

7/4/2024
Author Boyce Upholt's new book "The Great River" tells the story of the river, the Indigenous people who lived alongside the Mississippi and the white settlers who came along to claim it. Then, Here & Now's Scott Tong takes a trip to a Delaware Beach to see horseshoe crabs mating. The undignified process takes on a new resonance amid considerable concern about a decline in population, as the crabs are harvested for their blood and as bait. And, Minneapolis music writer Andrea Swensson talks about her book commemorating the 40th anniversary of Prince's "Purple Rain" album, which regularly ranks as one of the greatest albums of all time. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:32:43

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The trouble with air conditioning as the planet gets hotter

7/3/2024
Following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on presidential immunity, history professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat joins us to break down how that decision could lead to authoritarianism. And, air conditioning can be a matter of life and death. But some people in the U.S. are turning it off to limit their environmental impact. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports. Then, breaking, known to many as breakdancing, will make its Olympic debut in Paris. Longtime b-boy and breaking competition judge Donnie "Crumbs" Counts joins us. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:31:47

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Civil Rights Act turns 60: Activist Elaine Lee Turner reflects

7/2/2024
The Caribbean nation of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is assessing the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Beryl. Ernesto Cooke of the St. Vincent Times shares a first-hand account of the storm. Then, President Biden is forcefully criticizing the Supreme Court's ruling that gives former presidents broad immunity from prosecution for official acts. Andrew Desiderio of Punchbowl News tells us more. And, how might that decision alter the balance of power in the U.S.? Former U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade weighs in. Plus, Elaine Lee Turner and her sisters were called "the most arrested family in the Civil Rights movement." She joins us to reflect on the 60th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:28:23

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Supreme Court rules Trump has some immunity from prosecution

7/1/2024
As the Supreme Court's term comes to an end, law professors Kim Wehle and Louis Virelli join us to break down the recent court decisions. And, professor Caroline Le Pennec explains her research that shows presidential debates have little effect on voters' decisions. Then, New York City is planning to announce a ban on cell phones in the city's public schools. Chalkbeat New York's Amy Zimmer joins us. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:27:38

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The hottest games of the summer

6/28/2024
The Supreme Court issued several major decisions Friday on homelessness, government agency power and the Jan. 6 attack. The New York Times Magazine's Emily Bazelon and Slate's Mark Joseph Stern tell us more. Then, we discuss the political fallout from the first 2024 presidential debate between President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump. We're joined by NPR's Ron Elving, USA Today's Francesca Chambers and Chad Pergram of Fox News. And, Here & Now's James Perkins Mastromarino discusses June's gaming news, including the hotly anticipated add-on to Elden Ring. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:34:35

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3 big Supreme Court decisions on abortion, pollution, opioids

6/27/2024
The Supreme Court released a decision temporarily allowing abortions for medical emergencies in Idaho. The Court also blocked a multibillion-dollar settlement with Purdue Pharma and put an EPA smog rule on hold. Rewire News Group's Imani Gandy, Columbia Law School's Camille Pannu and NPR's Brian Mann join us. And, Here & Now's Chris Bentley and Peter O'Dowd spent a night staying in an Earthship in Taos, New Mexico. They unpack the stay and the other forms of sustainable living they learned about. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:28:20