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WSJ What’s News

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What's News brings you the biggest news of the day, from business and finance to global and political developments that move markets. Get caught up in minutes twice a day on weekdays, then take a step back with our What’s News in Markets wrap-up on Saturday and our What’s News Sunday deep dive.

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United States

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What's News brings you the biggest news of the day, from business and finance to global and political developments that move markets. Get caught up in minutes twice a day on weekdays, then take a step back with our What’s News in Markets wrap-up on Saturday and our What’s News Sunday deep dive.

Twitter:

@WSJ

Language:

English

Contact:

1211 Avenue of the Americas New York, NY 10036 212-416-2000


Episodes
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Assange Strikes Deal to Plead Guilty and Walk Free

6/25/2024
A.M. Edition for June 25. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is set to gain his freedom after reaching an agreement to end his yearslong battle to avoid trial over his U.S. espionage case. Plus, the WSJ’s Jonathan Cheng explains the significance of the U.S Ambassador to China accusing Beijing of undermining diplomacy. And, Boeing adds a last-minute twist to talks to buy Spirit AeroSystems, while rival Airbus struggles to meet production targets. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:25

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Turning Malls Into Minicities Is Slow Work for Brookfield

6/24/2024
P.M. Edition for June 24. Brookfield Property Partners’ plan to redevelop malls hits some road bumps. Reporter Kate King has more. And abortion-rights advocates are testing a new red state playbook in Ohio. National legal affairs reporter Laura Kusisto explains the state’s fight over abortion. Plus, columnist Jon Sindreu on how summer travel is booming, but airline stocks are not. Francesca Fontana hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:42

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Food Delivery Apps See Orders Drop After Hiking Fees

6/24/2024
A.M. Edition for June 24. Uber Eats and DoorDash have responded to cities’ new wage-increase requirements for gig workers by ratcheting up fees. The WSJ’s Preetika Rana says this is resulting in fewer orders, hurting the companies, restaurants and drivers alike. Plus, Apple discusses an AI partnership with Meta, while in Europe, it gets slapped with charges under new tech laws. And Israel plans to redeploy troops from Gaza to the Lebanese border once intensive fighting winds down. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:29

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What’s Really Happening in America’s Downtowns? Your Questions Answered.

6/23/2024
Are America’s downtowns doomed or are they thriving? Depending on where you look, the answer may be different. In some cities, like St. Louis, work from home has accelerated ‘doom loop’ scenarios, where businesses leave urban centers, causing tax revenue to fall and more residents and businesses to leave as well. Other cities, like Detroit, seem to be going through a downtown renaissance. WSJ commercial property reporter Konrad Putzier answers your questions about what’s happening with urban real estate and what it will take to get Americans to go back downtown. Luke Vargas hosts. Further Reading Chicago to Offer Most Generous Subsidies in U.S. to Save Its Downtown The Real Estate Nightmare Unfolding in Downtown St. Louis Offices Around America Hit a New Vacancy Record Reversing the Real-Estate Doom Loop Is Possible. Just Look at Detroit. Big Tech Is Downsizing Workspace in Another Blow to Office Real Estate Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:15:58

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What’s News in Markets: Nvidia Effect, S&P Milestone, Apple Pay Later

6/22/2024
What happened after Nvidia briefly became the most valuable company in the world? And how did investors react to the end of Apple’s buy now, pay later service? Plus, how did a drug that isn’t used for weight loss excite markets? Host Francesca Fontana discusses the biggest stock moves of the week and the news that drove them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:05:00

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Why Nvidia’s Success May Be a Problem for the Stock Market

6/21/2024
P.M. Edition for June 21. Nvidia’s value has skyrocketed, pushing the S&P 500 to record-breaking highs, but many other companies in the index have traded lower. Wall Street Journal senior markets columnist James Mackintosh explains why that split could be risky. And the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a federal law that forbids domestic abusers from possessing guns in a major Second Amendment decision. Plus, reporter Jim Carlton on how San Francisco is using its cool weather to attract tourists. Alex Ossola hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:47

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Trump Campaign Donations Surge After Guilty Verdict

6/21/2024
A.M. Edition for June 21. The former president’s campaign committee takes in twice as much as President Biden’s in May, though both men garner significant financial support from billionaires. And, the possibility of Marine Le Pen’s far-right, euroskeptic party leading France’s government triggers flashbacks of euro crises past, but WSJ chief economics commentator Greg Ip says things are different now. And, why the missing line on your résumé is… your golf score. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:05

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Catastrophe Investors Brace for Hurricane Season

6/20/2024
P.M. Edition for June 20. WSJ Heard of the Street columnist Telis Demos explains what is attracting investors to catastrophe insurance during a summer of extreme weather. And the Supreme Court upholds a 2017 tax on foreign investments in a decision that leaves unresolved other questions about federal taxing powers. Supreme Court correspondent Jess Bravin explains. Plus, the death of actor Donald Sutherland. Francesca Fontana hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:15:09

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Hezbollah and Israel Risk a Wider War Neither Seems to Want

6/20/2024
A.M. Edition for June 20. WSJ correspondent Dov Lieber explains how escalating tensions along Israel’s Lebanese border threaten to drag the two parties toward a bigger conflict, despite U.S. efforts to calm the situation. Plus, Louisiana requires public schools to display the Ten Commandments in classrooms. And issues with Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft delay the return of astronauts back to Earth. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:12:05

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Citigroup Tries to Sell Investors on the Hidden Value of Its ‘Financial Pipes’

6/18/2024
P.M. Edition for June 18. Citi CEO Jane Fraser is highlighting an under-the-radar profit engine: Citi Services. Deputy Wall Street bureau chief David Benoit has more. And Nvidia soars in marketsNv, making it the most valuable U.S.-listed company. Plus, reporter Phred Dvorak explains how the Biden administration's tariffs on Chinese solar panels could slow down the rollout of solar projects in the U.S. and drive up consumer costs. Jennifer Maloney hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:05

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Beijing’s Expanding Influence in America’s Backyard

6/18/2024
A.M. Edition for June 18. In a sleepy town in Peru, China is building a megaport to speed trade between Asia and South America. The WSJ’s Ryan Dubé says the project is part of a growing network of alliances that’s setting off alarm bells in Washington. Plus, electric-vehicle startup Fisker files for bankruptcy. And, several high-profile candidates turn down the chance to be Boeing’s next CEO. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:14:56

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North Carolina’s Rural Voters Reflect a Major Challenge for President Biden

6/17/2024
P.M. Edition for June 17. The Democratic Party has lost more of the rural vote in recent elections. For President Biden’s campaign, that’s an especially big problem in North Carolina, the most rural swing state. National reporter Valerie Bauerlein spoke with voters and party members about their concerns. And the White House plans to announce one of the biggest immigration initiatives in years, benefitting people living in the country illegally who are married to U.S. citizens. Plus, markets reporter Sam Goldfarb tells audio producer Anthony Bansie about how a furious bond rally could boost stocks and inject some life into the U.S. housing market. Pierre Bienaimé hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:15:07

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Why Older Voters Could Swing the Election

6/17/2024
A.M. Edition for June 17. Republicans have won the senior vote in every presidential election since 2000. Polls show this year could be different, potentially giving President Biden an unlikely boost in his tough rematch against Donald Trump, the WSJ’s Dante Chinni says. Plus, China’s troubled property sector shows few signs of improvement despite Beijing’s moves to prop it up. And, Wells Fargo’s plan to let customers pay rent on their credit cards ends up costing the bank dearly. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:14:00

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Will AI Investments Pay Off? Your Questions Answered.

6/16/2024
Businesses and investors keep making big bets on artificial intelligence. Earlier this month, Nvidia, whose chips power a lot of AI tech, topped $3 trillion in market cap. Other tech giants, like Microsoft and Amazon, are pledging billions to build up their AI capabilities. As their stocks soar and business leaders predict AI will cut costs and save companies major capital, will AI live up to the hype? Journal tech columnist Christopher Mims answers your questions on what AI can and can't do and what it'll take for the tech to fulfill its financial promises. Charlotte Gartenberg hosts. Further Reading This Record Stock Market Is Riding on Questionable AI Assumptions The AI Revolution Is Already Losing Steam Nvidia at $3 Trillion Isn’t Priced for Trouble Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:14:20

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What’s News in Markets: Musk’s Pay, AI Deals, Broadcom’s Split

6/15/2024
How did markets react to the Federal Reserve’s projections for cutting interest rates? And what happened to Tesla’s shares after Elon Musk’s multibillion-dollar pay package was approved? Plus, why is Broadcom following in Nvidia’s footsteps with a stock split? Host Francesca Fontana discusses the biggest stock moves of the week and the news that drove them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:04:36

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Supreme Court Strikes Down Ban on Bump Stocks

6/14/2024
P.M. Edition for June 14. The opinion discards a rule issued in the aftermath of a 2017 massacre in Las Vegas perpetrated by a shooter armed with bump stocks, which modify semiautomatic weapons to fire with the speed and lethality of military firearms. And from United Airlines to Netflix, there are changes afoot in the world of advertising, as Chip Cutter hears from advertising reporter Patience Haggin. Plus, Wall Street Journal Peter Rudegeair on how hedge funds are swimming in so much cash that they’re allocating billions of dollars to other hedge funds. Pierre Bienaimé hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:11:58

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Musk Pay Victory Sets Up Court Battle

6/14/2024
A.M. Edition for June 14. Elon Musk has won shareholders’ backing for his Tesla pay package, but that’s unlikely to put the issue to rest. Plus, with Gaza cease-fire talks at an impasse, the WSJ’s Rory Jones goes over the correspondence from Hamas’s military chief and the brutal calculation it reveals. And, Donald Trump floats a new idea for collecting federal revenue: all tariffs, no income tax. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:15:15

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Supreme Court Rejects Abortion Pill Challenge

6/13/2024
P.M. Edition for June 13. The Supreme Court ruling preserved wide access to the pills, which are the most common method of ending a pregnancy in the U.S. Jess Bravin, Supreme Court correspondent, has more. And Heard on the Street deputy editor Aaron Back explains how the Fed cuts rates without actually cutting rates. Plus, Tesla shareholders voted to reapprove Elon Musk’s multibillion-dollar pay package. Francesca Fontana hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:13:00

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Tesla Investors to Decide If Musk Is Worth $46 Billion

6/13/2024
A.M. Edition for June 13. Elon Musk says he has “wide margins” to win as hareholder vote today over his record pay package. Jefferies analyst Philippe Houchois says the visionary CEO enjoys strong support from retail investors, but can also be seen as Tesla’s enemy. Plus, Argentinians take to the streets as President Javier Milei pushes his austerity agenda. And, we look at the divisive housing perk that can add thousands of dollars to lawmakers’ pay. Luke Vargas hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:14:41

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Fed Projects One Rate Cut This Year Despite Mild Inflation Report

6/12/2024
P.M. Edition for June 12. Federal Reserve officials indicated most are in no hurry to lower rates, even after a report showed inflation eased last month. Spencer Jakab, global editor of Heard on the Street, has more. And investigative reporter Joe Palazzolo discusses how several female employees at SpaceX say its founder Elon Musk showed them an unusual amount of attention or pursued them. Plus, U.S. travelers can now renew their passports online. Pierre Bienaimé hosts. Sign up for the WSJ's free What's News newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:15:21