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From Our Own Correspondent

BBC

Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers telling stories beyond the news headlines. Presented by Kate Adie.

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

BBC

Description:

Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers telling stories beyond the news headlines. Presented by Kate Adie.

Twitter:

@bbcfooc

Language:

English


Episodes

Talking and listening in an insecure world

2/22/2024
Kate Adie introduces dispatches from Germany, the Red Sea, Argentina, the Hungary-Serbia border and Costa Rica. BBC security correspondent, Frank Gardner takes us behind the scenes at the Munich security conference, where the sudden announcement of the death of Alexei Navalny brought home the diplomatic challenges facing world leaders. Iran-backed Yemeni Houthis say they will continue to target ships in the Red Sea, in solidarity with Palestinian people in Gaza. This has had a major impact on global shipping and the US and UK has retaliated with air strikes. BBC Persian’s Nafiseh Kohnavard has been given rare access to US navy warships patrolling in the Red Sea. In Argentina, President Javier Milei, has defended his huge public spending cuts after annual inflation in the country soared beyond 250 per cent. Our South America correspondent, Ione Wells, has been finding out what people in Argentina make of his controversial plans for change. Migration continues to fill headlines – from the ongoing saga of the Rwanda asylum plan to Republicans playing hardball over how to stem illegal crossings on the US-Mexico border. Our Central Europe correspondent, Nick Thorpe, is never far from a border flash-point, and reflects on the characters he has crossed paths with on the frontier of Hungary and Serbia. Costa Rica is often portrayed as a gold standard of eco-tourism and its Corcovado national park is one of the best places on earth to watch wildlife. But, there are concerns that some species there are in decline, in part due to illegal gold mining, hunting and logging in the region. Qasa Alom has been exploring the challenges. Producer: Sally Abrahams Production coordinator: Sophie Hill Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:57

From Our Own Correspondent: An Insecure World

2/22/2024
Behind the scenes at the Munich conference where news broke of Alexei Navalny's death.

Duration:00:30:00

Reporting Gaza

2/17/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Israel and Gaza, Guyana, Finland and the USA. International media have been campaigning to gain access to Gaza in the months since the Israeli bombardment began - with only occasional access granted, which is closely supervised by the Israeli military. More often, news organisations have relied on Palestinian journalists already living and working in Gaza, who continue to operate under dangerous conditions. Jeremy Bowen reflects on the difficulties of telling the story of the Israel-Gaza war. After Guyana discovered it had substantial oil reserves almost ten years ago, its economy was quickly transformed and it's now the world's fastest growing economy. But its neighbour, Venezuela, recently contested Guyana's claim to oil-rich Essequibo region, which makes up two-thirds of Guyana's territory, reviving a centuries-old territorial dispute. Michelle Jana Chan went to see how the country had changed. Alexander Stubb was elected as Finland's president in polls last weekend, heralding a more hawkish approach to Russia. Finland acceded to NATO last year, and has a strategic role to play given its long border with its giant neighbour. Emilia Jansson reflects on what sort of President, Mr Stubb will be - and on what the presidential campaign revealed about Finnish attitudes. And in the US, the decor of the Oval Office in the White House is always closely watched when there's a change of President. Donald Trump's military flags were replaced with busts of influential figures from America's past, ranging from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Rosa Parks. Nick Bryant reports on what the contents of the President's bookshelf might reveal. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:28:36

From Our Own Correspondent: Reporting Gaza

2/17/2024
Jeremy Bowen reflects on the challenge posed by very limited media access to the war zone.

Duration:00:30:00

Fear of Famine in Ethiopia

2/15/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Ethiopia, Sweden, India, Australia and Ecuador. Ethiopia's Tigray region has already been devastated by war - now its people are facing starvation as swathes of land have been parched by drought. Our Diplomatic Editor, James Landale has been given rare access to the region, where he visited a clinic helping the hungry. Rising gang violence in Sweden has wrecked the country’s peaceful image. Now the government plans to introduce so-called ‘police search zones’ allowing officers to frisk people or search vehicles, even if they are not formally suspected of a crime. Matilda Welin reports on the dramatic upsurge in bombings, shootings and arson. In India, thousands of men, desperate for secure jobs, have been queuing at recruitment centres hoping to land work... in Israel. In a treaty signed last year, India’s government promised to send more than 40,000 workers to Israel, to help plug shortfalls in the construction industry there. Soutik Biswas has been talking to some hopeful recruits in India’s northern state of Haryana. A convenience store in Sydney, Australia, offers more than the usual variety of groceries. Amongst the tinned tomatoes and toiletries is a full-size, working Airbus A320 flight simulator - so you can learn to pilot a plane while picking up a pint of milk. Eleanor Smallwood has been to meet the man behind the machine. And, with its Elvis hairdo and eye-catching feathery necktie, we meet the rare, Long-wattled Umbrellabird. Stephen Moss trudges through the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador, to make his acquaintance (just don’t forget the binoculars). Producer: Sally Abrahams Production Co-ordinator: Sophie Hill Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:35

From Our Own Correspondent: Fear of Famine in Ethiopia

2/15/2024
The deadly mix of drought and war has left millions of people without enough food.

Duration:00:30:00

Who will govern Pakistan

2/12/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Pakistan, Syria, Gaza, Trinidad and Tobago and Ivory Coast. With most of the results now declared in Pakistan's general election, no political force has a clear majority. Jailed former Prime Minister Imran Khan is claiming victory, and another ex-PM, Nawaz Sharif, says his party has emerged the largest and is urging others to join his coalition. Caroline Davies reflects on how the vote has divided the nation. Residents of the tightly-controlled rebel-held area of Idlib, in Syria's north-west, are struggling to survive as aid funding has been cut one year on from the quake which struck Syria and Turkey. Leila Molana Allen visits an orphanage where children try to imagine a better future. Lucy Williamson follows the story of six-year-old Hind Rajab who was caught up in crossfire when she tried to leave Gaza City, following evacuation orders by Israel's military. She describes the efforts to stay in contact with her after her family died, and the perilous nature of rescue efforts that are replicated every day. Trinidad and Tobago is one of the wealthiest nations in the Caribbean, thanks to significant oil and gas reserves. But Tobagans often complain that Trinidad has reaped the benefits at the expense of their own smaller island. Sara Wheeler paid the island a visit. And finally, on Sunday Nigeria faces Ivory Coast in the final of the Africa Cup of Nations. James Copnall was there for the tournament, twenty years after he worked there as a correspondent. He charts its transformation after years of civil war. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:29:01

Who will govern Pakistan?

2/10/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Pakistan, Syria, Gaza, Trinidad and Tobago and Ivory Coast. With most of the results now declared in Pakistan's general election, no political force has a clear majority. Jailed former Prime Minister Imran Khan is claiming victory, and another ex-PM, Nawaz Sharif, says his party has emerged the largest and is urging others to join his coalition. Caroline Davies reflects on how the vote has divided the nation. Residents of the tightly-controlled rebel-held area of Idlib, in Syria's north-west, are struggling to survive as aid funding has been cut one year on from the quake which struck Syria and Turkey. Leila Molana Allen visits an orphanage where children try to imagine a better future. Lucy Williamson follows the story of six-year-old Hind Rajab who was caught up in crossfire when she tried to leave Gaza City, following evacuation orders by Israel's military. She describes the efforts to stay in contact with her after her family died, and the perilous nature of rescue efforts that are replicated every day. Trinidad and Tobago is one of the wealthiest nations in the Caribbean, thanks to significant oil and gas reserves. But Tobagans often complain that Trinidad has reaped the benefits at the expense of their own smaller island. Sara Wheeler paid the island a visit. And finally, on Sunday Nigeria faces Ivory Coast in the final of the Africa Cup of Nations. James Copnall was there for the tournament, twenty years after he worked there as a correspondent. He charts its transformation after years of civil war. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison Series Producer From Our Own Correspondent BBC Long Form Audio

Duration:00:28:42

America’s Endless Fentanyl Epidemic

2/8/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from the US-Mexico border, Chile, Spain, the US and India. The synthetic opioid Fentanyl is fifty times stronger than heroin, and was responsible for tens of thousands of overdose deaths in the US last year. Relatively easy to produce, it is smuggled in large quantities across the Mexico-US border. Will Grant reports from El Paso in Texas, and hears how it is poisoning young lives. Chile held two days of national mourning this week after wildfires wreaked a path of destruction through the central coastal region of Valparaiso. More than 120 people were killed with many more are missing. Jane Chambers has spoken to those directly affected. Spain has one of the most powerful feminist movements in Europe and the country recently passed new laws to protect women against violence – but only women. Now, some Spaniards are asking, has feminism gone too far? Ellie House reports from Madrid. Over the past 20 years, a charity has flown hundreds of thousands of military veterans to Washington DC to visit the war memorials built in honour of their service and sacrifice. Sophie Williams went to meet veterans from WW2, and the Korean and Vietnam wars who'd taken these 'honor flights'. India's economic boom has created some 169 billionaires. Many of India’s super-rich choose Mumbai as their home yet alongside this great wealth is enormous poverty. Half of Mumbai’s population live in slums – some just a stone’s throw from the millionaire mansions. For some, this can be the inspiration they need – after all, Mumbai is known as the city of dreams. Philip McCreery met one teenager who’s close to seeing hers come true. Presenter: Kate Adie Producer: Sally Abrahams Production Co-ordinator: Sophie Hill Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:29:02

French Farmers and the 'Siege of Paris

2/3/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from France, Turkey, Cambodia, Canada and Chile. French farmers have staged nationwide protests this week, blocking roads to vent their anger over falling incomes, rising bureaucracy, and competition from imports. Andrew Harding reflects on how these latest protests are a sign of a broader social and political schism that has been emerging in France. Next week marks a year since Turkey and Syria were hit by a devastating earthquake, which killed more than 60,000 people and displaced millions more. Victoria Craig travelled to Antakya in southern Turkey, one of the worst-hit regions, and spoke to people trying to rebuild their lives while still dealing with the grief of losing loved ones. Brick kiln workers in Cambodia work in some of the hottest and harshest conditions in the world. The factories often use a mix of fabric, plastic and rubber to fuel the kiln fires, which emit toxic fumes and trigger health conditions. Laura Bicker went to visit workers on the outskirts of the capital, Phnom Penh. Louis Harnett O'Meara takes to the road in British Columbia, Canada, to see some of the region's iconic redwoods. He hears how efforts to protect these centuries-old trees, along with the wider biodiversity of the region, are being met with opposition from communities dependent on logging for their livelihoods. In Chilean Patagonia, Kirsty Lang explores a remote region which has been converted into national parkland. encountering sea lions and a lone penguin along the way. It's now one of the world's most protected areas of wilderness, thanks to the work of two American philanthropists. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Rosie Strawbridge

Duration:00:28:53

Rebranding Indonesia's politicians

2/1/2024
Kate Adie introduces correspondents' reflections from Indonesia, Argentina, Kenya, Colombia and Germany. Prabowo Subianto was once a military hardman at the forefront of Indonesian politics. He's run for the country's presidency twice before - and failed. Will it be third time lucky for him on the 14th of February? The BBC's former Indonesia correspondent Rebecca Henschke recently revisited the country and was startled by his apparent image makeover to appeal to first-time voters. When Javier Milei was elected President of Argentina in November, it was largely thanks to his promises of radical change to save the economy. In Buenos Aires recently, James Menendez saw signs of fiscal distress everywhere. Kenya's Penal Code outlaws abortion - with limited exceptions after cases of rape or incest, or where mothers are ill or aged under 18. Yet each year, tens of thousands of women and girls facing unwanted pregnancies resort to backstreet clinics, or try to induce terminations themselves. Linda Ngari explores the dangers they face - and the reasons they're willing to run the risk. Going from armed rebel to eco-tourism enabler might seem a drastic career change - but it's a path some former guerrilla fighters in Colombia are keen to take. Zoe Gelber talked to some demobilised former members of the FARC movement who hope to make a more peaceful living guiding travellers through the rainforests they once fought in. And Rob Crossan goes on the trail of the bratwurst in Nuremberg. It seem like just a humble sausage - but it's protected by European legislation, has hundreds of years of history behind it, and is deeply beloved by locals looking for reassurance. Producer: Polly Hope Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Co-Ordinator: Sophie Hill

Duration:00:28:42

Ayodhya: a defining moment for India

1/27/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from India, Bangladesh, the US, Switzerland and Finland. This week, India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi, opened a grand Hindu temple in the northern city of Ayodhya. The site on which it sits was once home to a centuries-old mosque which was demolished by a Hindu mob thirty years ago. Yogita Limaye reflects on the impact of the new temple, which fulfils a dream for many Hindus, but has alienated much of India's Muslim minority. Samira Hussain attends a press conference in Bangladesh, soon after Sheikh Hasina was returned to power for a fourth consecutive term as prime minister. With voter turnout at almost half that of the previous election, Samira explores why Bangladeshi voters are feeling despondent, amid claims of growing autocracy in the country. After securing victory in the Republican primary in New Hampshire, Donald Trump is currently in a strong position to clinch the party's presidential nomination. Within his base is a sizeable contingent of evangelical Christians. Mike Wendling met with some of them, to hear how they have become a political force. China's human rights record has been under the microscope at the UN in Geneva this week. It's attracted particular interest as, since the last review, China has faced criticism for its continued repression of Uyghur Muslims, while clamping down on democratic freedoms in Hong Kong. Micky Bristow was there to watch proceedings. And John Kampfner visits one of the world's last remaining museums dedicated to Vladimir Lenin. Located in the Finnish city of Tampere, it tells the story of the complex relationship between Finland and Russia over the last century. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:42

Taiwan’s defiant message to China

1/20/2024
: Kate Adie presents stories from Taiwan, Ecuador, Germany, Georgia and Indonesia The pro-sovereignty candidate William Lai won Taiwan's presidential election this week. Our correspondent Rupert Wingfield-Hayes charts the key moments that led to this historic vote, as Taiwan's voters sent a signal to Beijing. Will Grant has been in the Ecuadorean city of Guayaquil which experienced a sudden descent into violence after two gang members escaped from prison, and a TV station was raided during a live broadcast. He meets one family who encountered tragedy in the crossfire. In Germany, Jessica Parker recounts her encounters at some of the nationwide tractor protests which blocked streets in towns and cities this week, as farmers took a stand against the removal of tax relief on diesel - but that's not the only thing German voters are angry about. Amelia Stewart visits a family trying to revive Georgia's once-thriving tea industry, which supplied 95 per cent of tea to the former Soviet Union. She visits Racha, in the country's north-west and hears how it's providing a welcome source of income for locals. And finally we travel on Indonesia's new high-speed 'Whoosh' railway. Funded by Chinese loans, the train runs from Jakarta to the economic hub, Bandung. Such infrastructure projects are one way for China to exert influence via its Belt and Road Initiative - but does the train live up to the hype? Nick Marshall takes a ride. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman

Duration:00:28:32

Japan: Learning Lessons from Earthquakes

1/13/2024
Kate Adie introduces stories from Japan, the USA, the Thailand-Myanmar border, Barbuda and Guinea-Bissau. The earthquake which shook Japan on New Year's Day brought considerable damage to the mostly-rural Noto peninsula. One noticeable pattern amidst the destruction was how much more robust modern buildings had proved to be over older, wooden homes. Jean Mackenzie reflects on Japan's evolving ability to cope with earthquakes. Every four years, the citizens of Iowa welcome a political circus to town - as national and international media, political grandees and pollsters flood in to cover the Iowa caucuses. Justin Webb explains how and why Iowa has such a special role in the electoral process. Although the world's attention may have shifted away from Myanmar's internal conflict, there are still several serious regional insurgencies raging against its ruling military regime. This fighting causes casualties - many of whom now have to seek health care outside Myanmar. after hospitals were targeted. Rebecca Root reports from a clinic on the Thailand-Myanmar border trying to treat Myanmar's sick and wounded. The tiny Caribbean island of Barbuda is beautiful and relatively undeveloped - but for how long? Caroline Bayley visited this idyllic spot to delve into a local dispute over a new airstrip and resort complex which could change its ecosystem and culture for ever. Despite their scruffy appearance and lack of cuteness, vultures have value - particularly in West Africa. They can help fight disease - and some people in Guinea Bissau believe their body parts work as cures. Sam Bradpiece explains why Guinea Bissau's government has moved to protect them. Producer: Polly Hope Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Co-Ordinator: Gemma Ashman

Duration:00:28:35

Running Out of Road For A Two-State Solution

1/6/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Israel, Guatemala, The Philippines, Greece and the Faroe Islands US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken is in the Middle East for another round of crisis diplomacy. After the assassination of a senior Hamas leader this week, there are now concerns the conflict will widen. Tom Bateman has just left his post in the Middle East and is now covering US foreign policy from Washington - which as he reflects - might have to draw on some lessons from history. Ahead of his inauguration next weekend, Bernardo Arevalo, Guatemala's President-elect, has had to contend with a series of attempts to prevent him from taking power. His victory in elections last year confounded all expectations, and was widely seen as a repudiation of Guatemala's political elite, which has been dogged by corruption allegations for many years. But, the country's democratic future is still hanging in the balance, says Rory Sullivan. Linda Pressly meets with a Catholic priest and a forensic pathologist in the Philippines, who are exhuming the remains of victims of Rodrigo Duterte's war on drugs. In the process they discover evidence that points to a very different version of events to the official line. Heidi Fuller-Love visits the Greek island, Antikythera, whose remote and idyllic setting is its greatest allure for visitors, but it also poses its biggest challenge for the small number of residents there. Now the Greek government is paying people 500 euros to live there. And finally - Tim Ecott reports from the Faroe Islands of the North Atlantic where residents are trying to conserve their land and traditions in the face of an influx of tourists. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Vadon Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman

Duration:00:28:55

The Changing Face of Modern China

12/30/2023
Kate Adie presents stories from China, Bolivia, the US and Italy. BBC China correspondent Stephen McDonell arrived in Beijing as a student 20 years ago and jumped straight into the city's buzzing nightlife. But the bohemian club scene he fell in love with was rapidly replaced by shiny new shopping malls, and towering skyscrapers as China's wealth and ambition grew. Along with the economic boom came substantial military expansion and a tightening of control in political and cultural life under Xi Jinping's leadership. Stephen ponders if change is always for the better. The southern US state of Louisiana is on the front-line of climate change. Its famous wetlands are now disappearing at a rate among the fastest in the world, and the state has lost nearly 2000 square miles of land over the past century leaving coastal communities increasingly vulnerable. Beth Timmins has met residents fearful for their future. The invasive Paiche fish is so large and voracious it’s been called King of the River by fishermen in Bolivia. It’s thought that the breed escaped from fish farms in Peru and swam downstream, to take over the waterways of the Beni region in northern Bolivia. This mighty invader has changed the lives of locals as Jane Chambers learned. And wild boars are on the rampage in Italy in rural areas - and now in cities too. Last year hunting laws were relaxed, to allow for the animals to be captured and killed in urban areas. This move was welcomed by Italy’s farming lobby – but has faced considerable criticism from city-dwelling conservationists. Nicholas Walton tells the story of how matters recently came to a head in his local village group-chat. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman

Duration:00:28:29

A Pivotal Moment in Ukraine's War

12/23/2023
Kate Adie presents stories from Ukraine, Tajikistan, Brazil and Mexico Over recent weeks, Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky has battled in vain to ensure further US funding for the war in Ukraine. Just one year ago, he received a standing ovation in Congress, such was the strength of support to see Ukraine victorious. Now, the reality is very different. James Waterhouse has been following events in Washington and in Kyiv and says why this is a defining moment for Ukraine in the war. In Dnipro, away from the frontline in central-eastern Ukraine, Tim Whewell encounters a group of men who have not yet been called up to fight. He hears about everyday life in the country's economic hub and how young men are making a living by any means as they live under the looming threat of conscription. When you’re based full-time in a country the stories you cover as a correspondent, from political strikes to a pandemic, are often also the stories you live yourself – and that certainly has been the case for the BBC's South America correspondent Katy Watson. As she prepares to move on to a posting in Australia, she reflects on the past decade she’s spent living in Brazil and Mexico. In the mountains of Tajikistan, in the region of Gorno-Badakshan, locals decorate their homes, light up trees and celebrate the life of a saviour - but it's not Christmas. This is home to more than 200,000 Ismaili Muslims, whose spiritual leader is the Aga Khan, whose life is the focus of the festivities. Chris Aslan joined in on the fun. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinators: Gemma Ashman and Janet Staples

Duration:00:28:39

Poland’s Political Drama

12/16/2023
Kate Adie presents stories from Poland, CAR, Hong Kong, Armenia and Tunisia This week the former Polish PM Donald Tusk returned to power marking a clear break from the right-wing, populist government that has been in office for the last eight years. Voters filled cinemas screening the parliamentary proceedings, as the country was gripped by the political drama. Sarah Rainsford was in Warsaw. In the Central African Republic, the Wagner Group is wielding significant political, economic and cultural influence. Yemisi Adegoke visited the capital Bangui and spoke to the President about his reliance on Russian mercenary group, despite allegations of abuse and extra judicial killings. The introduction of the Beijing-imposed national security law in 2020 led to an immediate crackdown on anti-government protests in Hong Kong. Several people were arrested under the new law, including the billionaire media mogul Jimmy Lai, whose trial is due to start on Monday - and there are many others. Danny Vincent spoke to another activist currently on remand. In Armenia, Julia Paul speaks to journalists who fled the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh in September, along with more than 100,000 others after the takeover by Azerbaijan. They tell her about the lives they left behind. And the latest round of climate talks in the UAE, looked to end in disappointment as leaders failed to incorporate any reference to the phasing out of fossil fuels in the conference’s initial draft agreement. But in a dramatic turnaround, nations finally announced a ‘transition away’ from coal, oil, and gas. Justin Rowlatt was behind the scenes of the talks in Dubai. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman

Duration:00:28:55

Hope and Disillusion in South Africa

12/9/2023
Kate Adie introduces dispatches from South Africa, Syria, the Netherlands and Germany. Fergal Keane reported from South Africa during the country's difficult transition to democracy after the end of apartheid. He revisits some familiar neighbourhoods and reflects on what happened to the hope and ambition that gripped the country at the time. Four years after Islamic State was defeated in Syria, thousands of children whose parents supported the group, are living in camps and detention centres with their mothers. Poonam Taneja met some of the children with uncertain futures, still hoping for a return to a normal life. The Dutch far-right populist leader Geert Wilders swept to a surprise victory in parliamentary elections last month, but there is still no guarantee he will become prime minister. Housing, immigration and the cost of living dominated the election campaign. Anna Holligan spoke to voters in the seaside suburbs of The Hague. Germany's plans for its much-vaunted ‘green energy transition’ are in deep water after a ruling by the country’s constitutional court blew a 60 billion euro hole in the project’s finances. Meanwhile German voters are questioning the cost of going green. Bob Howard was in Bremen. Series producer: Serena Tarling Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:39

The UAE’s Air Pollution Problem

12/2/2023
Kate Adie presents stories from the UAE, Iran, Ireland, Finland and Cambodia As the world's seventh largest oil producer, the UAE may seem an odd choice to host the world's annual climate summit, but the Emiratis have been keen to showcase their green credentials. But the UAE’s desired image is falling short of the reality, says Owen Pinnell, as he reveals the devastating impact of gas-flaring. In Iran, the enforcement of the mandatory hijab rule was once again in the spotlight after the death of 16-year-old Armita Geravand, following an alleged altercation with morality police in Tehran. While the mass protests seen last year may have faded, Faranak Amidi reflects on her own childhood in Tehran and the will of Iranian women to continue taking a stand. The Irish government has promised better resources for police and stronger hate crime laws after rioting in Dublin city centre just over a week ago. Our correspondent Chris Page says a combination of disinformation, growing anti-immigrant sentiment, and changing social dynamics is presenting new challenges in Ireland. Finland this week announced the temporary closure of all crossings on its border with Russia amid claims that Moscow has been deliberately channeling asylum seekers into the country. After Finland’s decision to join NATO, relations with Russia have soured considerably. Richard Dove was in Helsinki A new Chinese-funded airport has opened in Cambodia's north-east, serving as the main gateway to the Angkor Wat temple complex. China’s influence on the Cambodian economy is everywhere with numerous projects funded by Chinese loans. But this foreign influence is nothing new, says Sara Wheeler Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Gemma Ashman

Duration:00:29:05